What is the more serious crime- corruption or tweeting?

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DD
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What is the more serious crime- corruption or tweeting?

DD
"Two arrested for tweeting false information about a Zeta attack face 30 years in prison as terrorist".  
"The Operations Director of the Federal Electric Commission CFE released for lack of evidence after being arrested for accepting 10's of million dollars in bribes and kickbacks from U.S. companies seeking contracts with CFE."

Federal Prosecutors in the US started investigating the case in 2007.  They later handed down indictments against executives in at least two U.S. firms that allegedly paid tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks to Moreno and his colleagues at the commission starting roughly in 2002.

CFE spokesman Estafano Conde said the U.S. statement didn't mention Moreno by name. He said that while the commission, prosecutors and regulators were aware of the U.S. indictments and started an investigation, they did not find out Moreno was one of the officials involved, until the U.S. news media began mentioning his name in August 2010.

none of Mexico's anti-corruption agencies was able, apparently, to detect Moreno's corruption - until the U.S. news media reports emerged. Finally, on Sept. 15, 2010, the CFE released a statement saying Moreno had voluntarily resigned after being on leave since the previous month. It gave no reason for his resignation.

Mexican prosecutors finally issued an arrest warrant for Moreno on charges of illicit enrichment on Aug. 8. He was arrested Saturday at an airport in Toluca, a city just west of the capital, "while trying to escape justice," the federal Attorney General's Office said in a statement announcing the arrest.

It turns out Moreno already knew the law was after him: Five days before his arrest warrant was even issued, his attorneys asked a judge in the faraway city of Monterrey to issue a temporary injunction, arguing that any attempt to arrest him would violate his constitutional rights.

Calderon really got pissed.  "You catch them and put together a good case, and they get off free," Calderon said Wednesday.

Stung by Calderon's criticism, the Mexico Federal Judiciary Council, which oversees the courts, defended the judge, noting that under Mexican law illicit enrichment is not considered a serious crime and is eligible for bail.

The council suggested that the president, a lawyer himself, was undermining the nation by knocking the judges.

"Questioning the work of the judges without any basis, automatically and without any proof, constitutes a threat to national stability," judiciary council member Juan Carlos Cruz Razo said in a clear reference to Calderon's remarks.

The president responded Wednesday, saying that "what truly damages the safety and stability of the country is impunity, is the fact that thieves and criminals are out walking the streets."

n the United States, the wheels of justice have already rolled in the case: A California-based company and two of its executives were convicted in May under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for allegedly bribing Moreno with the yacht and the Ferrari. The executives face prison sentences of more than 30 years.

In Mexico, two Twitter users face up to 30 years in jail for publishing false information on the site about an attack at a school near Veracruz.

Maybe priorities have gotten a little turned around in MX?  Which is the more "serious crime", Tweeting information that they had heard, but turned out not to be true, or "illicit enrichment" in the form of bribes accepted by a public official.  The Mexican Judiciary Council, which oversees all the federal courts, seems to thing tweeting is the more serious.  Where would you start at rooting out corruption in the judicary?
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: What is the more serious crime- corruption or tweeting?

ArmChairIntellect
tweeting obviously