What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

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What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

I85cartel
To my knowledge from what I have learned from BB and other various sources, CHICAGO is probably one of the main Distribution hubs for Heroin in the United States. SAN DIEGO being another Distribution hub for crystal meth, and cocaine.

*We All Know About South Texas, and Arizona Border Towns such as: Laredo, Nogales, Brownsville, etc. .
But however, what cities are being used for main drop off points for large scale narcotics once they pass the border towns.

*My question to you is: Which cartels use what cities in the U.S and what are the main narcotics being trafficked to those major cities.....
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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

Mexico-Watcher




I found these two older maps in my archives that might be helpful.  I suggest that we think in terms of "metropolitan city regions" and less of "cities distribution" hubs.  

I say this because narcotics and other illicit activities of Mexican criminal organizations (cartels) avoid locating where law enforcement is more concentrated.   Yes, large cities are "hubs" but the "spokes" and rims of the hubs are the lesser cities, towns, and villages where the criminal actions are harder for law enforcement to address.

For example, Phoenix and Los Angeles are certainly cartel "hub" cities, but it is the surrounding towns that may be many miles away from the city where the cartels' many and varied licit and illicit criminal activities really occur.  

This geographic diffusion is "organically" natural in that many of the actors and entities that are directly and indirectly involved in the Mexican criminal organizations economy live in these more distant communities.  I contend that the huge economic impact of Mexican criminal organizations on "hub" regions is manifest  way beyond the obvious and overt illicit drugs, barrio gangs, drug addicts, and drug overdoses.  

Given what I am trying to convey, is the idea of greater diffusion as opposed to a more concentrated "hub" manner of thinking.  This may be a minor point to some, but is useful for my particular purposes.


Mexico-Watcher  

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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

Bajadrone-2
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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

Ed-Oak
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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

Mexico-Watcher
This post was updated on .
I agree with your post and add  that the US network of connecting interstate highways must not be ignored in our thinking on this topic.  Here is an excerpt  from Don Winslow's novel: The Cartel,  Alfred a Knopf (2015) that I think adds to our discussion here.  

[from,  The Cartel, page 28]
        "Sinaloa is the heartland.  It was the black loam of Sinaloa that grew the poppies and the marijuana that first gave birth to the trade, Sinaloa that provided the men who ran it.
        But the problem with Sinaloa is not what it has, it's what it lacks.
        A border.
        The Sinaloan base is hundreds of miles from the border that separates — and joins — Mexico from the lucrative American market.  While it's true that the countries share a 2000 mile land border, and all of those miles can and have been used to smuggle drugs, it's also true that some of those miles are infinitely more valuable than others.
        The vast majority of the border runs along isolated desert, but that truly valuable real estate are the "choke point" cities of Tijuana, Ciudad Juarez, Nuevo Laredo, and Matamoros.  And the reason lies not in Mexico, but in the United States.
        It has to do with highways.
        Tijuana borders San Diego, where Interstate 5 is the major north-south arterial that runs to Los Angeles.  From Los Angeles, product can be stored and moved up the West Coast or anywhere in the United States.
        Ciudad Juárez borders El Paso and Interstate 25 [up north to Denver and beyond], which connects to Interstate 40, the main east-west arterial for the entire southern United States and therefore a river of cash for the Juarez cartel.
        Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros are the twin jewels of the Gulf.  Nuevo Laredo borders Laredo, Texas, but more importantly Interstate 35, the North-South route that runs to Dallas.  From Dallas, product can be shipped quickly to the entire American Midwest.  Matamoros offers quick road access from route 77 to Interstate 37, and then on to Interstate 10 to Houston, New Orleans, and Florida.  Matamoros is also on the coast, providing water access to the same US port cities.
        But the real action is in trucks.
        You can haul product through the desert — by foot, of course, car, and pick up.  You can go by water, dumping loads of marijuana and vacuum-sealed cocaine into the ocean for American partners to pick up and bring in.
        Those are all worthwhile methods.
        Trucking dwarfs them.
        Since 1994 NAFTA treaty between the United States and Mexico, tens of thousands of trucks crossed the border from Tijuana, Juarez, and Nuevo Laredo every day.  Most of them carry legitimate cargo.  Many of them carry drugs.
        It's the largest commercial border in the world, carrying almost $5 billion in trade a year.
        Given the sheer volume of traffic, US customs can't come close to searching every truck.  Even a serious effort to do so would cripple US-Mexican trade.  Not for nothing was NAFTA often referred to as the "North Americans Free Drug Trade Agreement."
        Once the truck with drugs in it crosses that border, it's literally on the freeway.

        'The Fives' — Interstates 5, 25, and 35 — are the arterial veins of the Mexican drug trade.
        When Adan [Chapo Guzman?] ruled the trade, it didn't matter — he controlled the border crossing into El Paso, Laredo, and San Diego.  But with him out of power, the Sinaloans have to pay a piso — a tax — to bring their product across.
        … What most people don't understand is that the top narcos can go years or even their entire business lives without ever touching the drugs.
        Adan's [Chapo] days in [prison] are full.
        A thousand details require supervision.
        Supply routes into Mexico from Colombia have to be constantly refreshed, then there's transportation to the border, smuggling into the United States.
        Then there's money management — tens of millions of dollars flooding back from the United States, in cash, that need to be laundered, accounted for, invested in overseas accounts and businesses.  Salaries, bribes, and commissions that need to be paid.  Equipment to be purchased.  Adan's operation employs scores of accountants to count the money and keep an eye on each other, dozens of lawyers.  Hundreds of operatives, traffickers, security lookouts, police, army, politicians."

While Winslow's novel is fictional (for good reasons) it is, a work with much entertaining and educational value. IMO, it is a "must" read for those who want to get valuable insights into Mexican criminal organizations, governmental corruption, money laundering, sicarios and their lifestyles, and varieties of violence all described in natural, often clinically accurate terms.  If you read this novel, you will recognize many real persons and actual events that we who follow Borderland Beat will recognize.  I can understand some of the reasons for Winslow to distorts or obfuscate many real life facts... if you read this book, I think you will agree on his need to protect himself and others.


Mexico-Watcher
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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

bolio
They certainly have an excellent business model here in the US.  They whole sale it to gangs or whoever who take all of the risk and have to deal with a majority of the violence and prison time.  Further, these people are so scared of the cartels they do as they are told.
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Re: What Cities Are Distribution Hubs For Cartels In The U.S

I85cartel
That really helps me out a lot. Especially the maps. So, basically the fighting really originated from the control of interstates. I hear of these "plazas" they fight for control over in the Mexican border towns. What exactly is a plaza, and how does this relate to how the United States gets their drugs, or does it ever change. The more I start to read about this, the more interesting it becomes.
*Not a Broad Subject to say the least*

(Question#1)
I guess my question is: Does the fighting for plazas have anything to do with the interstates?              
(For example) Okay, so drugs that are sold IN the North Eastern part of the united states as well as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina.... etc ... Come from specific [Cartels] that coordinates with those plazas into the interstates that pass by or through those states in the US??  

*I feel I am not asking this question correctly. so excuse my short term ignorance*