Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
16 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

canadiana
Administrator
This post was updated on .
Migrating North, but to Mexico, Not the U.S.
 17/21


The New York Times logo The New York Times  
The New York Times



By KIRK SEMPLE

3 hrs ago
 
 
Migrants waiting for food at the Community Center for Migrant Assistance in Caborca, Mexico. Last year, more than 8,100 foreigners applied for asylum in Mexico, nearly three times as many as in 2015.…
SALTILLO, Mexico — Wendy no longer worries that when her sons leave the apartment in the morning, they may never make it to school. Memories of the gangs that haunted their lives in Honduras are slowly receding into the past.

The family fled its home last year after gang members tried to recruit the boys, threatening them with death if they did not join. They received asylum in Mexico, making them among the country’s newest residents.

“It’s not easy — as you can imagine — starting again,” Wendy said in an interview in this small city in northeastern Mexico, where the family decided to settle. “But we are better here because we are safer.”

The United States has long been the dream destination for many Latin American migrants, whether fleeing poverty, political unrest, natural disaster or violence. But now a growing number of migrants are putting down roots in Mexico, legally or illegally, instead of using it as a thruway to the United States.

They have many reasons for staying here. Crossing the Mexico-United States border has become increasingly difficult, migrants say, especially with rising smugglers’ fees and tougher enforcement. Some are deterred by the abundance of dangers that lurk on the route through Mexico. Some believe it might be easier to qualify for some form of legal status in Mexico than in the United States.

In recent weeks, yet another factor has begun to weigh on some northbound migrants: President Trump. Even if all the details of his recent policy declarations on immigration have not yet permeated the migration grapevine, his longstanding promises to restrict immigration have fueled a growing perception among migrants that the United States is becoming far less hospitable to immigrants, documented and undocumented alike.

“Here, at least, the people like you, they help you,” said Josué, 31, an undocumented immigrant from Honduras staying at Casa del Migrante, a migrant shelter here in Saltillo. “Why would you want to go to a country that doesn’t like you?”

A migrant family from El Salvador posing for a portrait in a shelter in Tapachula, Mexico. Most applicants for asylum in Mexico in the last few years have been from El Salvador or Honduras.© Mauricio Lima for The New York Times A migrant family from El Salvador posing for a portrait in a shelter in Tapachula, Mexico. Most applicants for asylum in Mexico in the last few years have been from El…
(Like other migrants interviewed, Josué requested partial anonymity, in his case because of his undocumented status. Others said they feared being tracked down by their persecutors.)

Josué came to Mexico about a year ago with the intention of “passing through” on his way to the United States, he said. But he was able to find work and liked Mexico enough, so he decided to stay for a while before resuming his trip.

With the rise of Mr. Trump, however, and the president’s vows to harden the borders of the United States and step up deportations, Josué has decided to remain in Mexico for the foreseeable future.

“In my case, I’d like to be in the United States to work,” he said during a recent interview at the shelter. “But this president, he doesn’t want anybody because he doesn’t like anybody.” Josué is now exploring ways to gain legal status in Mexico.

The number of migrants deciding to stay in Mexico is still thought to be a small fraction of the hundreds of thousands using the country as a transit corridor to enter the United States.

But the growing attractiveness of Mexico is plainly reflected in the country’s asylum program. Last year, more than 8,100 foreigners applied for asylum, nearly three times as many as in 2015, and more than 15 times as many as five years ago, according to statistics from the Mexican government.

At the same time, Mexico, under pressure from immigrants’ advocates, has been granting asylum at increasingly higher rates, in part because of improvements to its intake and processing system. In 2016, 63 percent of applicants, not including those who dropped their cases during the review process, received asylum or some other form of protection, up from 46 percent in 2015.

Most applicants in the last few years have been from El Salvador and Honduras, which have been convulsing with gang violence.

The increase in asylum petitions in Mexico is also in part due to the rise in detentions on the country’s southern flank, an effect of an American-backed plan begun in 2014 to better control the flow of people and goods crossing the Mexico-Guatemala border. After being stopped by the immigration authorities, some detainees have come to learn that they may be eligible for asylum, either through word of mouth from other detainees or during screenings with immigration officials.

“Many come here not knowing that the experiences they’ve had fit perfectly with asylum,” said Javier Martínez Hernández, a lawyer at Casa del Migrante, which helped more than 100 migrants apply for refugee status in 2016, more than double the number in 2015.

If the current trends continue, United Nations officials predict, Mexico could receive more than 20,000 asylum claims this year.

But advocacy and human rights groups believe that the population of migrants potentially eligible for protection in Mexico is much higher.

Many of the more than 147,000 foreigners deported from Mexico last year, for instance, might not have known that they qualified and were not given the opportunity to make their case before being deported, they say.

In the past year, the Mexican government has made a number of improvements to its asylum system, including increasing its staff and modifying the screening process to ensure that eligible migrants have a chance to apply, officials said.

The Mexican authorities have also begun releasing asylum seekers from detention while they await the resolution of their cases, a process that often takes three or more months, and have improved applicants’ access to humanitarian aid and psychological and legal counseling, advocates said.

“The Mexican government has recognized that this is increasingly a refugee situation,” said Mark Manly, the Mexico representative for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. He added that the Mexican authorities had been making “real progress” in improving processing and services for asylum seekers.

The government and the United Nations have sponsored a pilot program in Saltillo to help integrate asylum seekers into Mexican society. Begun in August, the program has so far involved 38 asylum recipients. Of those, 26 remain in the program, while the others have left and moved elsewhere.

Saltillo was chosen because it has plenty of employment opportunities and is relatively calm and safe, United Nations officials said.

Several program participants said life in Mexico was not easy, despite all the assistance they had received. It is hard to make ends meet; salaries at the bottom rung of the ladder are barely enough to cover the cost of living. And some, in the interest of disconnecting from the menacing world they left, have cut off all contact with friends, relatives and old colleagues in their home countries.

“It’s very sad to leave everything in your country,” said Ana, 41, a Salvadoran who immigrated to Mexico with her son, 18, and her two daughters, 15 and 21, after gangs tried to recruit her son and started threatening one of her daughters.

“Can you imagine? We had everything,” Ana added. “My children studying and then coming here and sleeping on the ground? It’s not easy.”

But all said they were happier in Mexico, in large part because they did not fear for their lives.

“I left all my friends and family, but after what happened, it made me happy to leave,” said Ana’s son, Fernando, who found work here cleaning rooms in a hotel. His older sister, who had been planning to enter a university in El Salvador to study medicine, works in the laundry room at another hotel.

Still, for many, the allure of the United States is hard to extinguish.

Wendy and her husband, José, have both found work — he with an air-conditioner contractor and she cleaning a private home. The boys are happy in their new school and are making friends. Yet the family is having a hard time covering expenses.

“I still have that aspiration to go to the United States or Canada someday,” José allowed as he sat with Wendy in their kitchen here. Both were wearing winter coats indoors because they couldn’t afford heaters to warm them against the cold.

Wendy saw where the conversation was heading — down a road they had clearly traveled many times — and she intervened.

“Our idea is to have our own home, build our own business. That’s the idea,” she said enthusiastically. “If we had a home of our own, I’d stay here for the rest of my life.”
 

 
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

Anasazi
If the current trends continue, United Nations officials predict, Mexico could receive more than 20,000 asylum claims this year.

20,000 in a country of around 120,000,000 is a drop in the ocean. Central Americans have been settling in Mexico, especially in the southern states, for decades. It's all good. Mexicans and especially Salvadorans like to talk smack about each other but really Mexico and Central America are fairly close culturally.

Recently, I've anecdotally started hearing about South Americans going to Mexico, especially middle-class Venezuelans fleeing the economic conditions down there. I'm close to an Ecuadorian family that's trying to relocate to and settle in Mexico. They were deported from the U.S., have a nice life in Ecuador because they saved up while working in the U.S., but they spent time in Mexico and liked it. They feel there is more opportunity to set up a small business in Mexico. Here, we focus on the violence and places like Acapulco, Juarez, Badiraguato, etc. but Mexico is a very large country and there are many places that are quiet and that offer decent opportunities relative to the rest of Latin America. Compare, say, Guanajuato to San Salvador and it's a no-brainer (no offense to my Salvi brothers and sisters). Not that there isn't endemic corruption in Mexico and tons of poverty but there are actually many places that are worse.

More worrying are the African/Haitian migrants in TJ and elsewhere along the border. They don't really want to be in Mexico. The U.S. is their real intended destination but most won't ever make it in under a President Trump-directed USCIS/ICE. So a lot will get stranded in Mexico, but they'll have a lot harder time integrating economically and socially than other Latin Americans.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

canadiana
Administrator
And here is what is happening at the northern border US/Canada with refugees,many Africans that claims were rejected in US.Some have lost fingers/toes crossing in remote locations in the winter.         <http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/losing-hope-in-us-migrants-make-icy-crossing-to-canada/ar-AAmReMd?ocid=iehp
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
So when are you gonna drop the ball on canada and give us inside info on how is life overthere with the mooseheads ?any experience you had with any central americans hitting your town ?has it effected the way of living overthere ?or is that just your avatar name ?just wondering hope you dont find yourself offended by this just curious!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
I heard central americans also migrate to spain .anybody know of any documantary out there that films some sort of journey to another country other than the us ?
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

canadiana
Administrator
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by deelucky1
Not to stay off topic for too long but to answer your question Dee yes there is some Central Americans here not lots but in the 80's ones from Guatemala,El Salvador and Nicara gua were accepted as refugees here along with folks from Chile.Seem to be more Mexicans here lately not a great deal like US but some working on farms and cattle feedlots in rural areas.They have  been accepted on work permits.Here they make $12.20 an hour minimum wage which a dollar here is about 17 pesos and are provided housing right on the farm,at least down the road from me on a few farms.I know people that work in the cattle industry.Funny I was reading a couple of days ago that last year the US accepted only 84,000 immigrants [I don't know if that includes refugees or not] and Canada accepts 250,000 immigrants per year [again I don't know if refugees are a different category].I know 40,000 Syrian refugees were accepted here last year.Actually Syrians are quite well educated.That's quite the difference in immigration stats between the 2 countries.Apparently our immigration is based on us maintaining our population [births vs deaths] of 35 million in such a large land mass that takes 7 or 8 days to drive from Pacific to Atlantic.[I can drive to Mexico in 4 days].Our border is almost 4 times longer than Mexico's so hope Trump doesn't make us pay for a wall.We have immigrants from all corners of the globe not very many Latin Americans but high numbers from Asia and the Middleeast.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
In reply to this post by deelucky1
Asylum is very popular choice with central americans when they get caught on purpose they are given a temporary stay to sustain theyre claim .back home forged paperwork is a very lucrative hussle to have.who is to say they did not suffer when they have paperwork to show false police reports etc.gypsie like culture at its finest cant say i can have a heart for crocodile tears just dont think its fair for people who go threw hell to get theirs the legal way and denied !
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
This post was updated on .
Lots of chinnese in tijuana  adapt really well big community base outthere.What did you think about the short film on collegehumor the youtube vid you took out ?do they need to have canadian humor for vids to be acepted ?excuse my ignorance just didnt see how it violated any policies on the site thought my avatr was more offensive and its still up!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

canadiana
Administrator
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by deelucky1
If Mexico gets bad enough they may qualify for refugee status but it depends on the country.I heard from an El Salvadoran refugee that US didn't permit refugee status to Central Americans in the 80's while that civil war was going on but Canada did but maybe the US was worried about being flooded with them.Makes me wonder though in the article they are immigrating to Mexico because it's safer than back home and Mexico unsafeness is getting more widespread.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by deelucky1
I noticed that about Mexicali too,lots of Chinese.I even noticed that in Venezuela.I think the Chinese are spread out throughout the world especially on west coasts.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
Dont know if the chinnese go with the same intention or beliefs they learn perfect spanish really fast with no acent at all only thing that throws them off is the eyes.i think people who cross should stop thinking they are any lesser than anybody cause it really screws up the workforce anywhere they go and salarys go downward spiral because of that!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
I talk to people first hand and  i like them to tell me their stories theres nothing like hearing it from people who lived it .but yes assylum seems very popular if you knew how easy it is you would not beleive it .thats why i was asking you if you can share any stories you had with people in canada .i wanted to see if it sounded familiar ?
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

deelucky1
That wendy story to me sounds very familiar i cant say she is lying i have no proof but what i can say its the majority of them make the cross lying about their past its in their best intrest and the only way to get status and they know it !talk to anygang member and ask them what do they think about people who dont want to be in a gang ?i beleive that kills the purpose of it all they dont like weak minded people as they call it .i doubt that approch is taken or their high as a kite if they do that!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by canadiana
This is the biggest crock of BS I have read in a long while.  

I have worked with the Casa Migrante shelters since the 72 were slaughtered in Tamaulipas.  Including Saltillo's PNs, and Acuna in coahuila alone.  I provide backpacks of supplies to each migrants, clothing, rain ponchos, phone cards, a little cash, toiletries, travel  food, toilet paper  etc.  I also have purchased  water heaters, washers, blankets and mattresses for all beds,  new roofing, commercial freezers and fridges...and so forth whatever they say they need I attempt to provide.  Including fun stuff like Christmas Posada dinner.  I have posted fotos and stories here on BB.

Inccluding the deplorable obama administration quiet policy of deportation.  No matter where the immigrant was from they were dumped at the Mex POE international bridge and told to "walk in to Mexico".  to an unfamilar city and perhaps into a nation where one still is without legal status.  Guess who is waiting for those buses to unload on the mexico side????  and BTW Obama deported more immigrants thru the south border than the three previous presidents combined.  

But please folks, don't pretend to care...I received TWO offers to help migrants from this post.  everyone is quick to get on the bullshit train, but never gets around to helping.

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/search?q=christmas

here is another with a story of my personal favorite success in saving a kid, who just turned 18, was caught crossing to be with his father in (in okla for 15 years)  the kid was never out of his ranch in San Luis Potosi.  He knew no one in Coahuila and had no cellphone, no money, the U.S. side kept it all.  He said the US police and agents steal money from the migrants.  

This story ended well, had he not been rescued for sure the Zetas waiting for him would have forcibly recruited him.  It should be noted the consulate on the Tex side would often call my office for assistance  

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2014/11/signing-off.html 

Mexico treats migrants like scum, they can only stay at the shelter for 3 days or are arrested by Mexico.
12k go missing each and every year...presumed dead but since bodies are often not found the missing never is moved to the death toll..

little central american girls are put on birth control before they cross tapachula to mexico to prevent pregnancies they may arrise in the rapes they will endure by Mexicans.  Cartels kidnap young girls and women for the sex trade.

Before the trek money is saved for the kidnapping phone call that will come from narco kidnappers usually within 24 hours, from the utmost south....many will be extorted again in Tamps.   If no money then they are forced to work for cartels.

US media is promoting a narrative against a new president they hate.  where were these assholes all of these 8 years when Obama administration said one thing, and did another and never prompted mexico to protect the migrants.  

I think the interest, and yes the outrage by those on the receiving end has zero to do with concern.  and compassion.

When I saw what happened in Tamps, I began my project i said for one or two years.  I had a budget I blew in 7 months, and I am still working the project.  each of the migrants has a  letter in the backpack  from me.  I tell the truth, why I began the project.  I have seen migrants opening cry.  One told us "No one ever before showed that they cared!  Here in this country they treat us so badly, not just narcos, but the people and mexico government.  They do not care how we are raped, robbed, and killed.  they hate us unless they can take advantage of us."

and that is the truth.

I don't claim to know the answers to immigration, I have given my views and offered solutions, for one they need to allow more in the legal system, instead of the cut back of 1M it should be 3M.  I think that will be done, may be 2M.  I heard Trump say that should be done, which is what he means by the beautiful door.  I don't know.  I just think this simple minded bullying and fighting does nothing.  nothing.  our enemies sure love seeing it.  As a nation we should allow the guy a chance.  condemn when there is something of real substance to condemn.  DO good research, don't watch the fake news, careful of your sources, check them.  who they are, why they are.  

But for me helping the migrants has always been a human issue, never once has  ideology or political alliance tainted my mind.  I just saw those photos of 72 slaughtered people, who refused to work for narcos.  So close to the border, to their perceived dream. and they were exterminated like they were vermin.   I could not just say "how awful" and move on with my life.  Especially these people.  mexicans don't help other Mexicans, among the lowest rung of charitable acts among nations.  so does one think they will help migrants?  that is why Priests do, at great peril, sometime losing their lives for it.  

Do not believe this asylum pr BS it is for theater.  all bogus.  using props and false stories, but those in mexico know the truth, those of us who hear the truth directly from the migrants.

 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

Tacuache
Sad but true.  Mexicans have/do treat some migrants from Central America pretty shitty.  I will put one caveat on that though, it's usually the Mexicans who have never or who's family never migrated.  Mexicans on this side of the border are at least somewhat sympathetic, in my view.  

When I was down in El Salvador for a school trip back a few years ago in college I stayed with some FMLA rebels.  They told me some crazy stories and I must say I saw some somethings that opened my eyes.  I saw why people ran from that country.  Anyhow, before I get off track on the CIA/black ops shit.  I was going say that one the guys when I was down there told me his story how he immigrated to the US.  He was the foreman on the site and me being the only Mexican on the trip we talked a bit.  Anyhow, I felt like ashamed knowing that Mexicans treated him like dirt while he passed through the country on his way to the US.  What's even worse is knowing my grandfather and father went through the same thing with "the whites" on their way here too.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Thousands claiming refugee status in Mexico,expected to increase

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chivis
Father  Alejandro Solalind of Oaxaca the most famous champion for the migrants says this:

"The story of Father Solalinde’s mission is entwined with the slow acceptance of an essential hypocrisy here: for all the complaints about the mistreatment of Mexican immigrants in the United States, Central and South Americans face far worse as they travel across Mexico.

The massacre of 72 migrants, whose bodies were found in August 2010 on a ranch in the northern border state of Tamaulipas, brought home the reality of the dangers to migrants.

The following April, the authorities found 193 bodies in mass graves not far away, many believed to be migrants kidnapped from buses traveling toward the border shared by Mexico and the United States. Experts believe that as many as 22,000 migrants are kidnapped a year, based on testimony compiled by the National Human Rights Commission in Mexico.

“There is enormous impunity in Mexico,” he said, vowing to continue his activism. “If crimes against Mexicans are never punished, well even less so for those against migrants.”
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please