The status of the various cartels

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The status of the various cartels

Anon
 
 I've been thinking about the various cartels, how their organized, how they've handled the hits etc., and I'd like to know what others on here think about how I see it. First I think each of these organizations has their own internal culture and way of doing things that is separate and distinct from the others. I think this has lead to some organizations being more like a cellular network and some being little more than a street gang. Here's how I see it. I'd like your feedback.

1) Cartel de Sinaloa- I see this cartel as a large network and agreement between producers, suppliers, enforcers, politicians, bankers and gangs. I think its a horizontal structure where there are some more important cell bosses (like Mayo and los Damasos) and less important cell bosses. There is no overall head of the organization, but some guys have a lot more pull than others. I see the Sinaloa cartel as something of an organic structure, basically more like the drug trade itself in western Mexico, moreso than a structured organization.

2) Cartel de Juarez- I see this group as basically an agreement between the enforcer group (la linea) and a few relatively small time traffickers. The drug traffickers of CDJ run opium, weed and Meth from the Valley de Juarez. La Linea is weakened but still does some extortion etc. The various street gangs, AA, Azteca etc., have as much if not more power on the streets of Juarez. So basically if Sinaloa is a combination of like 30 cells, CDJ is maybe one or two cells.

3) Cartel del Golfo - I see this as 11 autonomous organizations that have basically nothing in common with each other. CDG is like the bloods and the crips. I know the individual units are much more powerful, wealthy and organized than blood and crip sets, but what I mean here is that they have nothing in common except the name. They may fight each other, work together, work with each others enemies etc. So in my opinion CDG isn't even an organization, its more like a franchise. Each branch runs themselves.

4) Los Zetas- I see this group being a franchise like CDG, with some branches involved in oil theft, some in cargo theft, some in extortion, kidnapping, etc., etc. I think they barely fit the loosest definition of drug cartel. I think you could call Los Zetas a very powerful and heavily armed street gang at this point. Similar to MS-13, but with more structure within some of the various units. Some Zetas cells are just street gangs, some are more organized. I see little over all control and command. Perhaps a bit more overall leadership than CDG though.

5) Beltran Leyva- I see this as just a tenuous alliance of gangs and traffickers that once were part of the same organization. The various BLO cells such as Los Mazatlecos, or C.I.D.A (do they even still exist?), seem to have next to nothing to do with each other. So basically, I see BLO as essentially another franchise type structure, similar to CDG and to a lesser extent Los Zetas.

6.) Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generation- This is a top down, military style structure where there is a clear boss and a clear chain of command. The cells fall in line and are ultimately accountable to Mencho. I see CJNG as a much more ridged structure than the rest, this is similar to how Los Zetas was at the very beginning.

7) Caballero Templarios - Just a small group of regional cells at this point. Probably less than five semi autonomous cells, and little in the way of a central command and control center.

8) Cartel de Tijuana - Just a very small agreement of traffickers, with some street gang alliances. Probably only one or two cells and very little command and control.

The rest of the cartels are small, regional structures that vary in sophistication, but I think the groups I've listed here are the largest still operating. Of these groups, most are decentralized networks (Sinaloa, Los Zetas), some are loose alliances (Templarios, Tijuana, CDJ), some are basically autonomous cells (BLO, CDG) and I'd say only CJNG is a centralized, ridged organization.

Anyway, this is how I see it. I'd like to know where I'm right, where I'm wrong, what I missed, and what you guys think. Thanks.
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Re: The status of the various cartels

Nuttz
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Re: The status of the various cartels

Anon
Thanks. If trolls want to troll it, whatever. But legit criticism is welcome. That's how we all learn.
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Re: The status of the various cartels

Alacran
In reply to this post by Nuttz
Nuttz,
Who's that on your pic?
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Re: The status of the various cartels

manuel2984ny
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Re: The status of the various cartels

La Flama Blanca
Apparently its Chino Antrax at his wedding.  I used to ask Nuttz the same thing.  He's found a bunch of unseen Chapo pics too.  I think I remember him saying he searched through thousands of facebook pages and links and etc and IDK!!!  It would be cool if he posted a thread with some of his 'finds,' with full size pics, but I don't think he will.  Alacran, whos that in your pic? You? haha
777
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Re: The status of the various cartels

777
In reply to this post by Anon
Great post and analysis! I too would like to hear what others think. I agree some of the old "major" cartels have been marginalized. I'm not saying there will be smooth sailing from here on out. History has proven these type of things are unpredictable.

The Zetas, after the Gulf split, always seemed to be mere "cells" pledging loyalty to the Zeta brand. The betrayals that occurred within the ranks being a sign of the organizations immaturity. I know that might sound strange. Just the way I see it.

Sinaloa, on the other hand, has and always be a threat. The narco culture that is ingrained in that region is not going away anytime soon. The Chapo protests being the indicator.

I think the CJNG picked the wrong fight. What else is there to say? We all know what happened. What comes next is anybody's guest.

The CT, at some point, took the "creepy" title away from the Zetas. I don't see them trying to make too much noise anytime soon. Hang on to your seats folks... Another re-branding clown show?