The 43, Aguila

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The 43, Aguila

Parro
This post was updated on .
Don't think near enough attention has been paid to the 43 assasinated students in Aguila in 2014, supposedly and most assuredly by Guerreros Unidos, who have laid low, until the release of Al Gil last week.  AMLO has promised a "super" inquiry into the atrocity, but instead, we have the release of the plaza chief.  Following story was published today by Mexico Daily News, from their source, Milenio.  Perhaps, no greater outrage outside of Allende massacre, deserves more attention.  Story is as follows;



“They’ll never find them, we turned them into dust and threw them into the water.”

According to federal authorities, that was a cell phone message referring to the 43 students who disappeared in Iguala, Guerrero, in 2014, and was sent by Gildardo “El Gil” López Astudillo, a suspected plaza chief for the Guerreros Unidos gang, to his superior, Sidronio “El Chino” Casarrubias Salgado, days after the young men went missing.

The incriminating text is congruent with the past government’s “historical truth.” In that version of events, the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College were intercepted on September 26, 2014 by municipal police and handed over to gang members, who killed them, burned their bodies in a municipal dump and scattered their ashes in a nearby river.

The message, one of several pieces of damning evidence discovered by authorities on López Astudillo’s mobile telephone after his arrest in 2015, clearly implicates the alleged gangster in the disappearance and presumed death of the students, who were allegedly mistaken for members of a rival gang.

Yet a federal judge ordered the release of the key suspect on September 2, ruling that much of the evidence presented against López Astudillo by prosecutors of the former government was obtained illegally.

A report published on Tuesday by the newspaper Milenio said that authorities also found photos on López Astudillo’s phone that show victims of both torture – including people with serious wounds whose limbs had been amputated – and murder.

Other images show weapons, burned-out vehicles and crime scenes where Guerreros Unidos members clashed with gangsters from criminal organizations such as Los Rojos and La Familia Michoacana.

Among other incriminating evidence found on the phone were messages he sent to a contact identified only as Tintán.

On October 5, 2014 – nine days after the mass kidnapping – “El Gil” asked Tintán to send him his personal telephone number. The latter responded that he didn’t have one.

López Astudillo subsequently sent Tintán an extract of a newspaper article that said that authorities in Guerrero had discovered hidden graves that they believed contained the remains of the missing students.

“What do you think about this pedo [problem]?” the alleged gangster asked.

The evidence – as damning as it is – couldn’t be used to keep López Astudillo in prison, a Tamaulipas-based judge ruled, because it, or other proof, was obtained illegally, most likely through the use of torture.

The United Nations said in a 2018 report that 34 people were tortured in connection with the investigation into the disappearance of the 43 students, while a video showing the torture of a suspect was published on YouTube in June.

Human rights undersecretary Alejandro Encinas said last week that the acquittal and release of López Astudillo set “a very grave precedent” that could be used to release more than 50 other people who are in custody as a result of their alleged involvement in the students’ disappearance.

Several suspected Guerreros Unidos members, including the recipient of the “we turned them into dust” message, Sidronio Casarrubias, as well as Felipe Rodríguez Salgado and Erick Sandoval Rodríguez have already been released from prison after they were acquitted of involvement in the students’ disappearance.

The “historical truth” presented by the government of former president Enrique Peña Nieto was widely questioned both within Mexico and internationally and authorities were heavily criticized for their handling of the case. Many people suspect that the army played a role in the students’ disappearance and presumed deaths.

Two days after he was sworn in as president, López Obrador signed a decree to create a super commission to conduct a new investigation into the Ayotzinapa case but to date no new findings have been publicly disclosed.

Source: Milenio (sp)

Picture in next post of this asshole -
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
The SOB released by piece of shit judge:

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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro


The release of 21 municipal police officers detained in connection with the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero, in 2014, is a sign of the “wretchedness and rot” of Mexico’s justice system, according to human rights undersecretary Alejandro Encinas.

He told a press conference on Sunday that the decision of Judge Samuel Ventura Ramos to absolve the officers is an “affront to the victims, to their parents and to justice.

“It’s a mockery of justice because it feeds silence and complicity . . .” Encinas added.

The undersecretary also said that the judge’s ruling is an affront to the investigative work currently being carried out by the federal government to determine exactly what happened to the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College.

Encinas said that Ventura didn’t follow a legal precedent that establishes that in cases where evidence was obtained through the use of torture, people accused of committing a crime must be subjected to a new investigative process rather than being acquitted.

The judge ordered the officers’ release on the grounds that statements they made to prosecutors in the previous government were obtained by illegal means, including torture.

Encinas accused Ventura of hypocrisy, stating that while he exonerated the police because of the torture to which they were subjected, he didn’t assign any responsibility to those who allegedly committed the torture.

The judge’s ruling gave precedence to the interests of the alleged perpetrators of crime over the rights of its victims, the undersecretary charged.

“The judge interpreted the law with a lot of laxity . . . He didn’t impart justice and caused serious damage to the search for truth,” Encinas said.

The previous government’s “historical truth” – that the students were intercepted by corrupt municipal police and handed over to the Guerreros Unidos crime gang who killed them and burned their bodies in a municipal dump – has been widely rejected.

President López Obrador’s government has established a truth commission to conduct a new investigation into the case.

Encinas’ criticism of Judge Ventura and the Mexican justice system came a week and a half after he slammed the same judge for the release of Gildardo López Astudillo, who was allegedly the plaza chief in Iguala of the Guerreros Unidos gang at the time of the students’ disappearance.

Declaring that the release of the key suspect set “a very grave precedent,” Encinas announced on September 4 that the government would ask the Attorney General’s Office (FGR) and the Federal Judiciary Council to investigate officials and judges responsible for granting freedom to López Astudillo and others who were arrested in connection with the case.

On Sunday, Encinas applauded the decision of the FGR to launch investigations into former attorney general Jesús Murillo Karam – who first announced the “historical truth” – as well as former Criminal Investigation Agency chief Tomás Zerón and former Ayotzinapa investigation chief José Aarón Pérez.

They are “ex-officials who must be held accountable by the Attorney General’s Office,” he said.

Source: Milenio (sp)

MX
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

MX
Of course the government is going to blame the judge. But I've been thinking about this for a while now, and I don't think the judge is the guy to blame here. Mexican prosecutors are terrible at building a case against a criminal and following due process. That's why all these suspects were released. With the implementation of Mexico's New Criminal Justice System (Nuevo Sistema de Justicia Penal, or NSJP), lots of protocols have to fall into place when building a case and arresting a suspect. Mexican authorities are still working to adjust.

The government presented 107 evidences against El Gil, but close to 60 of them were illegally obtained or fallacious. Among them included recorded conversations from the DEA of Guerros Unidos members, but they ended up being inadmissible in court because they were not collected as part of an official Mexican investigation. The fact that the prosecution was unaware of this or was stupid enough to submit it for trial speaks to their level of preparation.
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Parro
there were plenty of arrested and accused that i was not sure about.  this guy is not one.  he is as guilty as hitler.  

hr was caught on audio

perhaps he will be brought to justice

almost all of those arrested have now been released
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

El_Bujo
Chivis wrote
there were plenty of arrested and accused that i was not sure about.  this guy is not one.  he is as guilty as hitler.  

hr was caught on audio

perhaps he will be brought to justice

almost all of those arrested have now been released
Absolutely Abominating...

& I am with you, Parro, The World Must Never Forget!!

#siempre #los43



It matters not how a man dies, but how he lives.
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
El Bujo, Chava, Infohiker, etc. all those who watch events Guerrero.  Visiting the museum in Pueblo 2018, the '43', changed me.  Artist depictions of the heinous crimes in Aguila.  College students commandeering a bus for a protest in Mexico Cd.  Kidnapped, tortured and burned, buried but not forgotten.  Municipal police, with Guerrero Unidos getting rid of a rival cartel.  Mayor, wife in on it.

AMLO promised a "super commission" to get to the bottom of the crime, but instead a judge who releases "El Gil", the municipal police officers and now, possibly the mayor and his wife, who supposedly ordered this atrocity against the students.  An ineffectual federal gov't, (AMLO and cronies false promises for election), federal judges and now the release of all the municipal officers on order of the mayor??  Sad.  Maybe Allende is the only the saddest story in this war.  As told by Mexico Daily News from their source Milenio today;



The former mayor of Iguala, Guerrero, and his wife – the alleged masterminds of the abduction of the 43 students who disappeared and were presumably killed in 2014 – could soon be released from prison.

Only one federal criminal charge is keeping José Luis Abarca Velázquez and María de los Ángeles Pineda Villa in the Altiplano federal prison in México state and the federal women’s prison in Amacuzac, Morelos, respectively, the newspaper Milenio reported.

The ex-mayor and his wife, formerly known as the Imperial Couple of Iguala, have been exonerated of all other charges of which they were accused by prosecutors in the previous federal government.

Federal officials told Milenio that the one outstanding accusation against the couple is a 2017 charge relating to participation in organized crime and operations with resources of illicit origin.

Abarca and Pineda were both allegedly complicit with the Guerreros Unidos crime gang which, according to the previous government’s “historical truth,” killed the 43 students and burned their bodies in a municipal dump.

The charge against the couple, however, is based on testimony from three witnesses whose declarations were ruled invalid by a Tamaulipas-based judge (what????!!!) because they were obtained through the use of torture.

Gildardo López Astudillo, who was allegedly the Guerreros Unidos plaza chief in Iguala at the time of the students’ disappearance, other gang members and 24 municipal police officers suspected of involvement in the case were recently released from prison because judges ruled that the evidence against them was obtained by illegal means, including torture.

An application for the release of Abarca and Pineda on the same grounds will be made in the coming days, Milenio said.

The newspaper also reported that a state-based charge against the former mayor for involvement in the 2013 abduction and murder of Arturo Hernández Cardona, who was the leader of the Democratic Revolutionary Party in Guerrero, is “hanging by a thread.”

Four other people accused of the crime have already been released from prison due to a lack of evidence.

Human rights undersecretary Alejandro Encinas said on September 4 that the release of López Astudillo set a “grave precedent” that could lead to other suspects in the Iguala case being freed, while this week he charged that the acquittal and release of municipal police officers detained in connection with the disappearance of the students was a sign of the “wretchedness and rot” of Mexico’s justice system.

Encinas said that Judge Samuel Ventura Ramos had made “a mockery of justice” by absolving the officers and warned that Abarca could also be exonerated for his alleged involvement in the disappearance of the 43 students of the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College.

Source: Milenio (sp)

WHY ALL OF A SUDDEN! ALL THESE.  DID THIS JUST HAPPEN AND EVERYONE IS STUPID??  MEXICO, STAND UP TO THESE CORRUPT JUDGES!!  DON'T LOOK FOR JUSTICE IN EL PASO AMLO, WHEN THIS IS IN YOUR BACK YARD!!


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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

.
Parro wrote
DON'T LOOK FOR JUSTICE IN EL PASO AMLO, WHEN THIS IS IN YOUR BACK YARD!!
Well said Parro.
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
REMEMBER!!



The investigation into the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero, in 2014 dragged on for more than four years under the previous government, and continues to do so.

The president of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) has expressed regret over the lack of progress made by the federal government, despite a commitment it has made to get to the bottom of the controversial and tragic case.

In an interview with the newspaper El Universal, Esmeralda Arosemena de Troitiño also said that all high-ranking officials who may have been involved in the disappearance of the students on September 26, 2014, or who may have obstructed the probe into the crime, must be investigated.

“The investigations haven’t advanced as quickly as we expected,” Arosemena said, although she added that it was “very encouraging” that President López Obrador met this month with the parents of the missing students, all of whom attended the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College in Guerrero.

That showed that the president was fulfilling his commitment to solve the case, the IACHR chief said.

However, the former judge of the Supreme Court of Panama said she had heard that some institutions – which she didn’t name – are not cooperating with the investigations.

Asked what the IACHR is demanding of the government, Arosemena responded that the commission wants “something concrete” from authorities by September 26 – the fifth anniversary of the students’ disappearance.

“[We want] something detailed from the investigation in order to find those responsible, but also the young men . . . I read in the news that there was already important information about where the students could be found, that [information] has to be acted on, it can’t be delayed, because the situation is coming up to five years,” she said.

Arosemena said that a fresh investigation into the events of September 2014 – the government said last week that a new probe into the case would be opened – must include interviews with army personnel stationed in Guerrero at the time.

According to the previous government’s “historical truth,” the students were intercepted by corrupt municipal police and handed over to the Guerreros Unidos crime gang who killed them and burned their bodies in a municipal dump.

However, the investigation carried out by the Enrique Peña Nieto-led government was widely criticized and many people suspect that the army played a role in the student’s disappearance. One theory is that the students’ bodies were burned in the incinerators of a Guerrero army base.

Arosemena also said that an investigation into high-ranking officials of the past government could be crucial to finding out the truth about what happened to the students.

The federal Attorney General’s Office has announced that it will investigate former attorney general Jesús Murillo Karam – who first announced the “historical truth” – as well as former Criminal Investigation Agency chief Tomás Zerón and former Ayotzinapa investigation chief José Aarón Pérez.

The IACHR president said that solving the Iguala case is important because it will bring “peace and tranquility to the entire population” of Mexico and enhance the standing of the country’s justice system.

If officials are found guilty of involvement in the student’s disappearance or obstructing justice they must be punished, Arosemena said.

She added that she was confident that the truth would be uncovered, explaining that she has seen evidence of some progress made by the government’s truth commission and that she personally knows Omar Gómez Trejo, the special prosecutor in charge of the reexamination of the case.

“. . . He participated in the GIEI [the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts, which was formed by the IACHR to assist the previous government’s investigation]. That gives me confidence . . .” Arosemena said.

Gómez said last Wednesday that authorities are going to start the Ayotzinapa probe again, explaining that “a long list of politicians that bear different degrees of responsibility” would be investigated.

Arosemena said that the IACHR has a representative in Mexico who will closely monitor the progress of the investigation, adding that she was hopeful that the commission would have the opportunity to president evidence related to the case.

“We rejected the historical truth with scientific facts. However, they [the previous government] maintained that version [of events]. Now it’s another time, there are other circumstances, I hope that we will be listened to . . .”

Asked whether the release from prison of 77 people linked to the Iguala case represented a failure of Mexico’s justice system, Arosemena responded:

“The accusatory criminal system is not designed so that criminals leave [prison] laughing at their victims. What we need is for the system to work so that people who can provide information [about a crime] receive some kind of concession . . . It’s not about releasing them because their responsibility has to be determined but we need to find mechanisms, other than torture, to get that information.”

The United Nations human rights office said in a report last year that that were “solid grounds to believe that torture was committed against” 34 people arrested in connection with the disappearance of the students.

Gildardo López Astudillo, who was allegedly the Guerreros Unidos plaza chief in Iguala at the time of the students’ disappearance, other gang members and 24 municipal police officers suspected of involvement in the case were recently released from prison because judges ruled that the evidence against them was obtained by illegal means, including torture.

Source: El Universal (sp), Reuters (en)



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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

canadiana
Administrator
Is there a link to this interesting development Parro besides stating the source?Thank you.
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
It's a subscription to "Mexico Daily News", which allows (5) views if you don't have one.

I consider them an aggregator of all things Mexico, for Ex-pats in Mexico.

Link:  https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/lack-of-advances-in-ayotzinapa-probe/
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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
The 43, the biggest priority of AMLO, who released all the accused, and stated he would get to the bottom of the case.  AMLO is worthless.  Today's news from the "43" parents;



Published on Tuesday, November 12, 2019

The parents of the 43 students who disappeared in Guerrero in 2014 have given President López Obrador two months to produce results or they will increase the intensity of their protests.

After a meeting on Monday with the president and other federal officials, a lawyer for the parents said that a clear message was sent to the government: police involved in the students’ disappearance and former officials who botched the investigation must face justice.

“They demanded the arrest of the people responsible,” said Vidulfo Rosales.

“There is . . . sufficient evidence to arrest several individuals, mainly former officials who participated in the events. We ask for the police officers who participated in the aggression [against the students] and the officials who carried out the investigation poorly to be arrested,” he said.

“The commitment of the government is that there will be results in January; we hope that’s the case. If not, the tone of the protests will be raised.”

Mario César González Contreras, father of one of the missing Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College students, expressed a similar sentiment, stating that if there are no arrests by January 2020, “things are going to get complicated.”

Human rights undersecretary Alejandro Encinas, who in September slammed the decision of a judge to release 21 municipal police officers detained in connection with the students’ disappearance, told reporters that the federal Attorney General’s Office is preparing to summon former officials who were involved in the Ayotzinapa investigation.

They include former attorney general Jesús Murillo Karam and former Criminal Investigation Agency chief Tomás Zerón, who Encinas said were among the officials who “crafted the poorly-named historical truth.”

The previous government’s “historical truth” – that the students were intercepted by corrupt municipal police and handed over to the Guerreros Unidos crime gang who killed them and burned their bodies – has been widely rejected.

Encinas said the special prosecutor’s office that was given the task of conducting a new investigation into the case will present a report in December with its first findings.

He expressed disappointment that the parents of the missing students have set such a tight deadline for the government to produce results and bemoaned the release of another suspect in the case, alleged Guerreros Unidos hitman Marco Antonio Ríos Berber.

Ríos, also known as “El Cuasi,” was one of the first four people arrested in connection with the students’ disappearance. He admitted to killing the students, burning their bodies and disposing of their remains.

Ríos also said that he purchased fuel that was used to douse the students’ bodies prior to their alleged cremation. In addition, authorities in Guerrero found more than 60 photos on his phone that showed people that had been beaten, tortured, murdered and buried in hidden graves.

However, a Tamaulipas judge freed Ríos in late 2014 due to insufficient evidence and he fled to the United States, violating the conditions of his release. He was recently deported from the United States and recaptured in Mexico but a Guerrero judge released him late last month on a bail of 10,000 pesos ($520).

Encinas said that 77 of 147 people arrested in connection with the Ayotzinapa case have now been released from prison.

He described the decision of judges to release suspects as “very regrettable” and said the government hopes that no other people accused of involvement in the students’ disappearance are set free.

“We hope that the Attorney General’s Office . . . strengthens the cases . . . against the people who are [still] detained,” Encinas said.

There has been speculation that the alleged masterminds of the crime, the former mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca Velázquez, and his wife, María de los Ángeles Pineda Villa, could be released from prison because they have been exonerated of all but one charge brought against them by prosecutors in the previous federal government.

Source: El Universal (sp), Milenio (sp), Publimetro (sp)

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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

Parro
In reply to this post by Parro
Austria -

Now El Gil is dead, good riddince.



The remains of six bodies found in Guerrero have been sent to Austria for analysis to determine if they belong to any of the 43 male students who disappeared in September 2014.

Speaking to reporters outside the National Palace in Mexico City after meeting with relatives of the missing students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College on Thursday, Deputy Interior Minister for Human Rights Alejandro Encinas said that the remains were delivered to forensic investigators at the University of Innsbruck on Monday.

The remains of three of the bodies were found in a ravine located on community-owned land in the municipality of Cocula, while the other remains were found near the city of Iguala in an area known as Jesús de Nazaret, he said.

The students disappeared in Iguala on September 26, 2014, after buses they had commandeered to travel to a protest in Mexico City came under fire by municipal police.

According to the former federal government’s official version of events – the so-called “historical truth” – the students were killed by members of the Guerreros Unidos gang after they were handed over to them by corrupt municipal police.

After killing the students, who they allegedly mistook as members of a rival gang, the Guerreros Unidos gangsters burned the bodies in the Cocula municipal dump and scattered the ashes in a nearby river, the previous government said.

Encinas said on Thursday that the so-called “historical truth” is collapsing as a result of new investigations conducted by the Federal Attorney General’s Office (FGR). The previous government’s version of events was built on “torture and simulation,” he said.

Approximately 80 suspects have been released from prison due to a lack of evidence or because courts found they were tortured during the interrogation process.

In addition to the remains sent to the University of Innsbruck – whose researchers previously identified two of the missing students by conducting DNA testing on bone fragments – Encinas said that “other discoveries” were made in a cave contaminated by bat feces. The findings will also be subject to analysis, he said.

The deputy minister said that authorities in Mexico did not know when the results of the testing in Austria would be available but stressed that the government will announce the findings as soon as it has them.

For their part, parents of the 43 presumably dead young men said that they asked Attorney General Alejandro Gertz Manero and Supreme Court Chief Justice Arturo Zaldívar to do all they can to speed up the investigations in order to find out what happened to their sons and where they ended up.

The two officials’ meeting with the parents came after President López Obrador personally asked them to work together to seek justice in the case.

The parents told Zaldívar that only one court should be tasked with working on the case because many are currently doing so and the investigation is progressing slowly as a result.

Vidulfo Rosales, a lawyer for the students’ families, said that criminal cases related to the students’ disappearance are currently being heard by several courts, each of which applies its own criteria.

“All it does is delay access to justice for the mothers and fathers,” he said.

The parents asked Gertz to launch investigations into Federal Police and municipal police from Huitzuco, Guerrero, which borders Iguala, for the crimes of forced disappearance and torture. They also urged him to initiate new criminal proceedings against suspects who have been released.

López Obrador signed a decree to create a super commission to conduct a new investigation into the Ayotzinapa case just two days after he was sworn in as president in December 2018 and has pledged that his government will not rest until it knows the whereabouts of the missing students.

While the government has rejected the version of events set out by the administration led by former president Enrique Peña Nieto, after 15 months in office it has not offered its own alternative conclusion.

Source: El Universal (sp)

SIDENOTE:  A day came where a corpse appeared in the melting glaciers between Innsbruck and Bolzano, Italy.  This corpse was sent to Innsbruck, claimed as a Neanderthal from the Austrian region.  Surveys were conducted, to conclude the corpse lied on the Italian side of the Alps.  Under extradorinaiy precaution, the corpse was returned to Italy from Austria.  Today the "Iceman" museum displays the corpse in Balzano, Italy.  Extreme science was applied to last remaining Neanderthal, and put into a refrigeration box for viewing.  - I could go on, but here is my take [no better place to determine the remains of the 43]. The science is cutting edge.  Hopefully reprieve to the parents.  Don't forget the mayor, his wife, the municipal police and Los Granados.  Either exonerate them, or charge them.  Too much time has passed since one of Mexico's greatest tragedies  .  .

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Re: El Gil - the 43, Aguila

canadiana
Administrator
What’s the story behind El Gil’s death? And now we will never know the truth about the 43.I was wondering if he was killed by the Government ( probably municipal) to shut him up or he wanted to be where he left off and someone took his place and he was killed by his own or whether a rival got him?Or something else?
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Re: The 43, Aguila

Parro
In reply to this post by Parro
https://www.voanews.com/americas/mexico-issues-warrant-ex-head-investigations

The Americas
Mexico Issues Warrant for Ex-Head of Investigations
By Associated Press
March 19, 2020 04:18 AM




MEXICO CITY - A Mexican judge issued an arrest warrant for the former head of investigations for the Attorney General's Office for alleged violations in the investigation of the case of 43 college students who disappeared in 2014, officials said Wednesday.

Tomas Zerón and five other former officials face charges including torture, forced disappearance and judicial misconduct. Three have been arrested and three, including Zerón, are still at large.

Zerón oversaw the criminal investigation agency of the Attorney General's Office and also its forensic work in the case. The students' bodies have never been found, though a burned bone fragment matched one student.

Many of the suspects arrested in the case were later released, and many claimed they had been tortured by police or the military. The current administration, which took office Dec. 1, 2018, has pledged to re-open the case.

Federal officials who were not authorized to be quoted by name said that a warrant was issued for Zerón's arrest and that Interpol had been notified to help locate him in case he was outside of Mexico. One of the officials said there were indications that Zerón may have left for Canada in late 2019, but it was unclear whether he later traveled elsewhere.

Zerón's investigation had long been criticized by the families of the 43 teachers' college students who disappeared in September 2014 after they were detained by local police in Iguala, in the southern state of Guerrero. They were allegedly handed over to a drug gang and slain, and have not been heard from since.

Zerón was at the center of the government's widely criticized investigation, which has failed to definitively determine what happened to the students. Two independent teams of experts have cast doubt on the insistence of Mexican officials that the students' bodies were incinerated in a huge fire at a trash dump.

The students attended the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa. They were in Iguala on Sept. 26, 2014, to hijack buses to use for transportation to a rally in Mexico City. They were attacked on the buses by local police and allegedly handed over to members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel.

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Re: The 43, Aguila

juris
is there a single competent, honest person in Mexican government?