Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

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Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Chivis
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Strange but true Mexicans are falling for this...mano alluded to this in a recent comment on forum... I will say a litium battery lasts apx 3-4 years embedded in the body, the antenna is a problem however..jeje....article from Washington Post..paz, Buela..



QUERETARO, Mexico — Of all the strange circumstances surrounding the violent abduction last year of Diego Fernandez de Cevallos, the Mexican power broker and former presidential candidate known here as “Boss Diego,” perhaps nothing was weirder than the mysterious tracking chip that the kidnappers allegedly cut from his body.

Lurid Mexican media accounts reported that an armed gang invaded Fernandez’s home, sliced open his arm with a pair of scissors and extracted a satellite-enabled tracking device, leaving the chip and a streak of blood behind.

Fernandez was freed seven months later with little explanation, but the gruesome details of his crude surgery have not dissuaded thousands of worried Mexicans from seeking out similar satellite and radio-frequency tracking products — including scientifically dubious chip implants — as abductions in the country soar.

According to a recent Mexican congressional report, kidnappings have jumped 317 percent in the past five years. More alarming, perhaps, is the finding that police officers or soldiers were involved in more than one-fifth of the crimes, contributing to widespread perceptions that authorities can’t be trusted to solve the crimes or recover missing loved ones.

Under-the-skin devices such as the one allegedly carved out of Boss Diego are selling here for thousands of dollars on the promise that they can help rescuers track down kidnapping victims. Xega, the Mexican company that sells the chips and performs the implants, says its sales have increased 40 percent in the past two years.

“Unfortunately, it’s been good for business but bad for the country,” said Xega executive Diego Kuri, referring to the kidnappings. “Thirty percent of our clients arrive after someone in their family has already experienced a kidnapping,” added Kuri, interviewed at the company’s heavily fortified offices, opposite a tire shop in this industrial city 120 miles north of Mexico’s capital.

Xega calls it the VIP package. For $2,000 upfront and annual fees of $2,000, the company provides clients with a subdermal radio-frequency identification chip (RFID), essentially a small antenna in a tiny glass tube. The chip, inserted into the fatty tissue of the arm between the shoulder and elbow, is less than half an inch long and about as wide as a strand of boiled spaghetti.

The chip relays a signal to an external Global Positioning System unit the size of a cellphone, Kuri said, but if the owner is stripped of the GPS device in the event of an abduction, Xega can still track down its clients by sending radio signals to the implant. The company says it has helped rescue 178 clients in the past decade.

 Skepticism abounds

In recent years, all manner of Mexican media reports have featured the chips, with some estimating that as many as 10,000 people are walking around with the implants. Even former attorney general Rafael Macedo told reporters in 2004 that he had a chip embedded “so that I can be located at any moment wherever I am.”

That’s pure science fiction — a sham — say RIFD researchers and engineers in the United States. Any device that could communicate with satellites or even the local cellular network would need a battery and sizable antenna, like a cellphone, they say.


 
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Bones
From the interwebs:

"Theoretically, a GPS-enabled chip could one day make it possible for individuals to be physically located by latitude, longitude, altitude, speed, and direction of movement. Such implantable GPS devices are not commercially available at this time."

LOL some poor saps are shelling out 2 grand a month for what amounts to having a worthless piece of metal implanted in you?? I guess it could help identify the body when they dig it up a few months later...somebody has been watching too much Bourne
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Re: Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Chivis
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wouldn't it be logical to give it a little test after implantation to see if it is operational?  they just keep paying each year thousands of dollars walking around with a piece of junk that can't work.  

strange
 
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Re: Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Guerro
In reply to this post by Chivis
Maybe its funny to some but these actually work. Know someone who was located because of this chip after he was kidnapped. To these researchers who have their doubts with technological advances these days its not impossible for a little chip like this to work.
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Re: Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Chivis
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jajajaja....oh well.

it is scientifically impossible.   WHich is the point.  one needs an antenna.

where was the antenna implanted?

where was the battery?

 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Spurred by Diego's GPS-Scared Wealthy Mexicans are Flocking to Buy Under Skin Tracking Devices

Guerro
Nope not scientifically impossible.  As you can see where the components of the chip you can see where the antenna is located.

As this is a part of an article I found:

Microchips and other radio-frequency identification devices (RFID) have been imbedded in pets and attached to items in order to track them for years. VeriChip is one; it's been sold in the US since 2002 and was approved for implantation in humans by the FDA in 2004, in spite of the fact that tests from the mid-1990s showed that the implanted microchips had "induced" cancer in laboratory animals, with most of the tumors encasing the implants. By 2007, about 2,000 of the devices had been implanted in humans around the world, The Washington Post reported.

While the current technology available for human implantation doesn't store much data -- just a 16-digit ID number -- the possibilities are there. And though it could provide peace of mind for parents -- police and FBI could track the child with the chip much in the same way security companies can track stolen cars that have RFID devices built-in.

Even the former US president daughter Chelsea Clinton's has this chip located at her neck which broadcasts her location to a satellite.