Monterrey; The New Juarez

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Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
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This post was updated on .
Monterrey and Juarez are only 220 murders apart in the "official" tally...

Video is the hanging of "The Redhead", all other pics are Monterrey violence including the screaming teen that was alive when hung but survived.... and I posted pics from the mass killing this month in Bar Sabino Gordo where reportedly; 27 killed, 7 wounded and 8 kidnapped at bottom of post...Buela 

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=117_1294096962

Screaming teen-shot-hung-survives..  video  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsVqo68aXm4&feature=related


 

The northern city of Monterrey, once Mexico's symbol of development and prosperity, is fast becoming a new Ciudad Juarez.
Drug-related murders this year are on pace to double last year's and triple those of the year before in the once-tranquil industrial hub. In recent weeks a tortured, screaming teenager was hung alive from a bridge. Two of the governor's bodyguards were dismembered and dumped with messages threatening the state leader.

Last week, gunmen killed 20 people in a bar where Ziplock bags of drugs were found, the largest mass murder to date in the metro area of 4 million people. The toll continued this week: 14 were killed in separate hits on Wednesday, eight more on Thursday.

Officials say two cartels turned the city upside down practically overnight when they split in early 2010 and are trying to outdo each other with grisly displays.

Security officials acknowledge they don't know how much worse it will get.

"As long as there are consumers and a critical mass of young people for these gangs to recruit, it's hard to imagine the number (of killings) will go down," said Jorge Domene, state security spokesman for Nuevo Leon state, where Monterrey is located.

The scale of the killings has rarely been seen in Mexico outside border cities such Juarez, Tijuana and Nuevo Laredo, the main gateways for drugs passing into the United States that have seen dramatic surges of violence since President Felipe Calderon intensified Mexico's crackdown on organized crime in 2006.

And fear is starting to fray the social order. Concern over violence has caused enrollment to drop at the prestigious home campus of Mexico's top private university, the Technology Institute of Monterrey, which has had to lay off some employees.

The chamber of industry in a brash, proud city where the annual income per capita is double the national average didn't want to talk to The Associated Press about the impact of violence on business, though some executives acknowledge they've had to spend more on security.

Shirt factory owner Gilberto Marcos, a member of a citizens' council on security, said some businesses have clearly faced extortion from drug gangs, though few cases are reported.

The Gulf Cartel once controlled drug running through Monterry, and Mexico's third-largest city had a reputation as a quiet, safe place. Where drug traffickers were present, they avoided creating problems, hiding their families amid neighborhoods of corporate executives.

The violence exploded when the Zetas broke away from the Gulf Cartel, creating a struggle for control of the area. The fight has left more than 1,000 people dead so far this year in Nuevo Leon state, compared to 828 in 2010 and 267 in 2009.

In wealthier parts of the area, restaurants are still packed and people still jog and walk their dogs at night. In poorer suburbs, though, entire blocks have been held up by gunmen and young people snatched off the streets.

Monterrey has still not reached the desperation of Ciudad Juarez, which was always a much grittier city and is now considered one of the world's most dangerous after more 3,000 people were killed last year. There, extortion, killings and torchings of businesses have devastated the local economy and sent people fleeing across the border to El Paso, Texas.

But Monterrey is rapidly growning more violent even as murders in Juarez have begun to drop.

Gangs in Monterrey hung the battered body of a topless woman from a freeway overpass last December and more recently two young men were tied to ropes, dangled from an overpass and shot in the midst of rush-hour traffic. One survived.

Sister Consuelo Morales, director of the Citizens in Support of Human Rights, said about 70 families have come to her for help in finding sons and daughters kidnapped off the streets or from their own homes.

One couple, who didn't want to be named for fear of retaliation, said their son, an 18-year-old university linguistics major, was abducted by a dozen gunmen who broke into their home one night in January.

Their best hope is that he is working for a cartel.

"We have this hope that they have him packing drugs or money," said his father, a taxi driver who quit working to search for his son full time.

The Gulf Cartel and the Zetas broke apart over the killing of a Zeta in the border city of Reynosa, across from McAllen, Texas, in January 2010. Since then, they have made a war zone of northeastern Mexico, even as the federal government has mounted a special operation to stop the violence with thousands of military and police reinforcements.

The federal government has made a show of force in Tamaulipas state in Mexico's northeast corner, where the Zetas are blamed for slaughtering 72 migrants nearly a year ago, then kidnapping bus passengers and burying them in mass graves. Domene said that has only pushed the violence westward into Nuevo Leon.

Local and state government can't fight back because much of their police forces have been corrupted or coerced by the gangs.

Nuevo Leon state Gov. Rodrigo Medina has promised to purge bad elements from law enforcement, but critics say his government has moved too slowly. So far only three of the state's 51 municipalities have fully vetted their police departments, Domene said.

In Guadalupe, a suburb of 700,000 badly hit by the violence, only 100 of 800 police officers remain after the new mayor began purging her police department a year and a half ago, he added.

Last month, the dismembered bodies of two of Gov. Medina's bodyguards were dumped in Guadalupe with a message accusing him of favoring one of the cartels. It didn't say which one.

On Thursday, Federal Police Commissioner Facundo Rosas inaugurated the first of nine permanent checkpoints that will be manned by soldiers and federal and state police on all major roads leading in and out of the city. The first is on a federal toll road between Monterrey and Reynosa, a highway that used to be traveled by shoppers heading to Texas.

The state also recently opened a police academy, where recruits have to have at least a junior high-school education, be in good physical and have no criminal record. While that seems minimal by other countries' standards, Mexican forces have traditionally been made up of poorly educated, low-paid workers who receive little training.

The first group of 422 officers will graduate in September after five months' training. Another 1,600 are expected to be trained by the end of the year, Domene said.

Nuevo Leon officials have proposed dissolving all local police departments, which in general are among the most corrupt in Mexico, to create one force of 14,000 newly trained and vetted state officers by 2015. But the proposal has stalled in the local legislature.

For Marcos, the government's efforts to improve security in the state come too little too late.

He said residents had been pushing for the government to do more on security since at least 2005, when drug violence tore apart nearby Nuevo Laredo, the border city across from Laredo, Texas.

The Sinaloa and Gulf cartels were fighting for control there. The Gulf won the fight, backed by their then-allies, the Zetas. "They ignored us because it wasn't politically convenient to address the problems then," Marcos said. "We said this could become a serious problem and look at us now."

Video of Massacre at Sabino Gordo:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLK0M4TDO4Q&feature=related





AP
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
any info on the shoutout that happened in Monterrey on Saturday night? It rolled by my family's house in Monterrey....
"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Guerro
In reply to this post by Chivis
Your post does not specify how many murders were committed in the city of Monterrey from the State of Nuevo Leon.

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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
Nice pic, is that from the San Pedro area?
"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra
yeah.  Thats San Pedro.  I live in San Jeronimo and have a great view from the Colinas.

Its sad what is happening here.  Does not seem like too much is happening over here by SP or SJ, but that does not mean it won't.  I started coming here 5 years ago for business and have been living here since march 2011.  Back then it was peaceful and nobody was hanging from bridges.  Now, they are finding heads in garbage bags in front of Gran Pastor.  Crazy.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
Sounds cool.... I have family around that area, all down Lazaro Cardenas but mainly in the affected neighborhoods.
I know what you mean! I grew up going to Monterrey since the day I was born and now we are unable to go as we used to. I have been there since all this started but it isn't the same. Lots of military and police patrols through the neighborhood, then come the bad guys patrolling the neighborhood as well. Halcones were everywhere, I could see them at the street corners, food stands, etc. just watching and reporting all movements.
"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra
yuppers..Halcones are everywhere.  Young kids sitting outside of banks, Soriana, HEB, Pemex, Galerias Mall, OXXO, and just on randon=m street corners.  Gives me the creeps.  I'm as gringo as they come other than the fact that I speak and read fluent Spanish.  I'm sure I stick out like a sore thumb, but overall I feel ok about the surroundings here.  I used to love going to Papa Bills for a few drinks or even out for a stroll, but ya no.  I stick close to home and my office is no more than 1km away.  We do venture out on weekends over to Cumbres and I have a few buddies over in Mitres, but those areas still seem to be not as hit hard at Guad, San Nic, Apodaca, and Santa Cat.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Guerro
In reply to this post by El Regio
Yes Regio its san pedro. Many people forget that Monterrey, mi ciudad, is going through hard times but we are still a growing and prosperous city. I just pray the violence ends soon. Here a some pics I thought you would like.





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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
In reply to this post by Chupacabra
From speaking to someone in Monterrey that has first hand knowledge of the situation. He tells me that if you aren't connected in any way then you have nothing to worry about. I know this is true any group (Yes even Los Zetas), I tell him I am afraid of getting caught in the crossfire or being confused for someone else or perhaps being targeted because of my vehicle or nationality. He assures me it is safe though... lol

It's hard for us to go as much, when we do go we stay in the worst part of Monterrey. That is where are family is from and they have been there for 50+ years. People know who we are, perhaps that has kept us safe because prior to all this mess, Taxis wouldn't go into the neighborhood por  (culos) lol.
"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
In reply to this post by Guerro
Those are great pics.... thanks!
"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chivis
I think it is more true than not that one is relatively safe if not with any group, but there are so many gangs who are ruthless and innocents get killed no doubt.  I love Mty, looking at the pics make me sad, I would get so excited coming from Coahuila and seeing "the saddle" on the mt top knowing I was close.  and seems every week I am sending kids for medical testing or treatment in Mty and each time I wait to exhale because sometime they don't listen and they wander around where they should not.  I finally made a rule if they don't do as we say we will not help them in the future.  

I would die if one of my kids was hurt.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

El Regio
Yes Buela it is sad indeed... I would enter Monterrey from Laredo and would get the autopista from NL to Mty and I remember the last few hills before getting to Monterrey (the one with the Bull on top)! What a beautiful view of Mty that was.



"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra
In reply to this post by Chivis
True, Buela.  The key to staying safe here is knowing where to go and where not to go.  Even then, you never know what may happen at any time.  I have my wife (from Oaxaca) and my 2 small girls with me whenever we go out far from the house.  It makes me nervous to know that what may happen to me, may happen to them.  Still, that does not deter me from living my life here in Mexico.  I am here by my choice.  I was the one that proposed my relocation from the US here to Monterrey.  I understood the risks and the rules before coming.  In the last 5 months since I have been here the rules have changed.  Knowing to adapt is clutch.

I don't live in a low income area so I sometimes feel that I am in a sort of "bubble" here in the SJ, but its where we are safer.  Good thing my company pays for my house(rent) or I would not be so well off.

The thing that makes me nervous the most and keeps me paranoid is that I am constantly thinking that "they" know I am here.  I am not in a gated community nor want to be.  Whenever I walk by a halcone I just keep eyes forward and go (you can tell who they are because they have nextels and are sitting in the same spot for a few hours).  I don't have much money and I am not a big time exec from oversees.  its imperative here that you don't walk around like a big shit wearing fancy clothes and oozing machismo...that shit doesn't fly and makes you a target (at least for gringos).

Long story short- I love Monterrey enough to call it HOME.  I only wish I could have firearms in my home to protect my family and our house.  In the US I was and am an avid gun collector.  I have the same firepower in the US that these thugs have here.  I now am limited to baseball bats, a harpoon gun, a machete in every room of the house, and some mace canisters that I was able to get over the border undetected when I crossed.  In my vehicle I have a machete and brass knuckles.  I may get some crap if the Federalis ever find them, but I am willing to take the risk for just even a small piece of mind.  I am a short guy but have worked out and trained in Judo and Greco Roman for the last 17 years as well as other types of self defense and offence.  I don't think I look like an easy target. I know I don't feel like one.   I'm not afraid, but have a healthy respect and awareness of my surroundings here in MTY every time I leave the house alone.  Sometimes I feel like a shell shocked war veteran, always sitting in the corner of a restaurant so I can see who is coming in and who is leaving, always checking my rearview mirrors,  never parking next to a car, truck, or van with tinted windows, and never, never disrespecting a local Regio.  Keep your head down but eyes up.
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra


Here is a view of the Silla from my house
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chupacabra
Chupa..

I have to share w/you that Chupacabras are the running joke in our family, I am thinking of getting a couple of Boston Terriers and naming them Chupa & Cabra, sick? yes I know but not as sick as your profile foto.

Well Mty is my favorite city, I could live there full time.  The city I am in in Coahuila is NOTHING like Mty but I love it too.  I am there because it logistically makes sense but if I had my choice it would be Mty.  I really become like a little kid when on my way there, like Christmas morning, I can't explain it, you know like some cities just have a character of its own?  San Francisco, Boston, Hong Kong, Singapore?  I have seen the decline of Mty that is heartbreaking, but it did not have to happen.  Calderon should have taken action 3 years ago, they say NL gov asked for help 4-5 years ago as they saw the writing on the wall.  There is plenty of culpa to go around, including businesses and people that have abandon the city.  That is SO wrong and counterproductive, it makes things worse.

I laughed at your describing Halcones becaue I always say look for the kid with the nextel that stays in the same spot for hours.  jaja, yep they are easy to spot.  I think you are doing everything right.  and yes you do live in a bubble but one does not stay in the bubble.  How one looks and dresses is so imperative.  I am a Tee and Jeans gal but when I first went to Mx I wore my big ass diamond and bis ass matching studs and after a serious talk with another humanitarian who said "leave it off, jesus I wanted to chop your hand off myself." so I wear no jewelry, dress down gave up the big black SUV and go low key.  My one big mistake is the early interviews I did when they asked where the money came from..stupid me I said 100% family funds.  But honestly the Zs have offered help so they must not think I am that wealthy which is fine with me!

About the gun.  You are able to apply as a US citizen for a gun license, the caliber is limited but also your wife as a Mx citizen is able to have a gun for protection under article 10 of the constitution.  You apply and buy the guns from the army, it is not ideal but it is something.

Paz...B

PS...LOVED your foto
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra
jajajaja..Chupa y Cabra?  Thats hilarious.  I have been interested in the legend of Chupacabra for the last 6-7 years now.  Its kinda like the US's BIGFOOT legend.  

I try to be aware of everything around me here in MTY.  Good and the bad.  The Mountains, The Valley, Cola de Caballo, the people and the Cabrito! (my favorite grilling food).  I bought a whole Cabrito the other day for a fiesta de asador we were having with some friends.  It turned out great!  The head is my favorite part...shhhh...don't tell my US friends...jajajja.  Nothing like an ice cold Topo Chico and some head tacos!

I was not aware that I could own a firearm here in Mexico.  I have an FM3 and when I applied I was told that I could only own one if I was a hunter (Elk and Deer) and even if I did that I could not own or carry the ammunition.  Do you know that the cal. limit is?  I would be very interested in this opportunity just for home protection.  Right now my firearms are collecting dust in my Fort Knox storage cabinet back home.  Is there a limit to how many I can own here?  Back in the US I have 17 in total with 9 being shotguns.  I was a member or numerous skeet shooting clubs and was wondering if they have any clubs similar to those here in Mexico....but once I heard rumors of the gun laws I was a little heart broken...oh well.

I'm hoping to stay here in MTY for a few more years before I get transferred to DF.  I really love it here.  Just upset that its not the city I knew 5 years ago.  

Crazy personal note- On Tuesday night over in San Pedro an armed group killed a transit cop....funny thing was that the news gave the number of his cruiser and low and behold it was the same cop that stopped me 4 weeks ago close to the Rotunda for not having a front license plate.  He was a nice guy and understood why I did not have one on my US plated car...my state doesn't require a front plate.  I gave him some of my chewing tobacco as a friendly gesture after a few minutes of BSing after he realized that I spoke Spanish well.  He had a FAT dip in and I offered him some of what I had to change it up a little.  I think it was the same guy, but may not be if they switch up and trade cruisers at all.

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Re: Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
Administrator
Yeah and our dog, a little temple dog, in China I named Cujo.  It is a good name that our Chinese employees can say with ease.  He was a stray with parvo that my animal lover husband saved along with 60 more over the years.  Chinese eat dogs not have as pets but that is changing somewhat.

I don't want to mislead you about your ability to have weapons, you can for hunting, for sure so I would say I love to hunt I think the restriction is 22?  but handguns your wife can get and I believe it is restricted to 38.  I have a lot of info when I have a little more time and if it is different than what I am saying or addidtional info I will let you know.

PS..my family thinks I believe in the Chupacabra...jajaja
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re:Americans can have guns in Mx.... Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chupacabra
Article 27: The right to bear arms will only be authorized for foreigners when, in addition to satisfying the requirements, they accredit their status of "Inmigrados" (quivalent to permanent residents), except in the case of temporary license permits for tourists with sports-related intentions.

Join a shooting club and then it is very easy to get a permit.
380 Auto or .38 special
Escpetas is 12 gage barrels 25" or longer
Rifles bolt action or semi automatic

Private parties sales are legal after you get a permit

also there are collector permits and I have a note that those are not easy to obtain, but I can't remember why I had that notation.

you are allowed 1 handgun and 9 rifles/shotguns

Actually you are in a even more advantageous postion because you live in Mx, so you can get a permit easier and it is not temporary as in the case of hunters.  And of course your wife is allowed.

 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Re:Americans can have guns in Mx.... Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chupacabra
Thanks Buela!  The Shooting Club thing is a good idea.  I was in a few Skeet clubs back in the US so that would be my first option.  Would rather have a firearm that I can use(shoot) and not collecting dust in the house.  We used mainly 12ga Remingtons and Winchesters with 25" being the minimum anyway, so thats not an issue for me.  I'm going to start researching.  Thanks for the info!
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Re: Re:Americans can have guns in Mx.... Monterrey; The New Juarez

Chivis
Administrator
You bet!  Let me know how it works out for you.  And your wife will she be exercising her right to bear arms?  

Paz..B
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please