Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

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Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

Mars220
Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui thought of herself as invincible. Many of her followers believed that whatever she said was true, regardless of the facts. She and some colleagues of hers, arrogantly assumed they could blatantly use a privately-owned company's logo and reputation as a backdrop for the newly formed website: MexicoLeaks, without the company's consent. How wrong they were.

In the United States, Hispanic journalist, Jorge Ramos may be thought of as influential but just because some consider him as such, does not mean he is correct every time he expresses his opinion. And express himself he has, as he publicly demanded for Aristegui to be reinstated.

Aristegui's fellow colleagues were allegedly fired from MVS Communications for illegally using the company's logo in promoting their own project: MexicoLeaks. Aristegui demanded their return or she would not return to work. Seeking demands by threatening to leave, is not tolerated in most countries, so why should this case be the exception. Make no mistake, Jorge Ramos would have been fired from Univision had he ever used those same tactics.

MVS Communications merely accepted her resignation. However, for many months now, she and her followers are making a public storm over her own decision to resign. They claim there was a conspiracy by the current Mexican administration to get her fired.

Their reasoning? A report that she and her fired colleagues concocted regarding the Mexican President's, Enrique Peña Nieto's house, which they have labeled "The White House". He and his very famous actress wife, Angelica Rivera, purchased neighboring homes and have illustriously designed it, sparing no expense it seems. Although it is a minimalistic design, costs are estimated to be about $7 million U.S Dollars. That in itself, is a lot of money to spend in one of the poorest countries in the world. But Peña Nieto's income and most importantly, his wife's income, merits the spending.

Detractors, including Aristegui, have denounced that they are using the country's limited resources to build the house. However, because of Carmen Aristegui's lack of investigation before the story was published, many were led to believe that it was the Presidents house, when in fact it was his wife's, acquired before their marriage.

Mexican First Lady, Angelica Rivera, began her acting career at a very young age. Thanks to television contracts and retransmission consent agreements from many successful shows and telenovelas, along with sponsorships and advertisements she starred in, she was able to make the fortune she has today. Yet, many are accusing her and her husband of unfounded corruption, that Carmen Aristegui and her two journalism colleagues, seems to have made up.

There may have been some level of corruption in the granting of millionaire contracts to former associates but this is not the first time this has been done, either in Mexico or elsewhere in the world. Sure, it may not be the right thing to do but to single out an individual because of ideological differences is just plain wrong.

Many believe that leftist-leaning activists are attempting to destabilize Mexico and the administration of Enrique Peña Nieto since he took office. Last year's excuse was the Ayotzinapa case, where 43 students went missing in the state of Guerrero. A state that is governed by the leftist opposition, PRD. Instead, supporters of the leftist party and some so-called journalists, laid the blame squarely at the current President of Mexico, who's government and political party had nothing to do with the events that occurred in Iguala, Guerrero last year.

And now, the ping-pong issue is regarding the fired journalist, Carmen Aristegui. Many accuse the Mexican President of ordering her removal from the airwaves. Yet, it is clear that Aristegui presented her own resignation. Otherwise, MVS Communications would have had every right to fire her.

http://www.examiner.com/article/mexican-journalist-carmen-aristegui-sought-her-own-demise
Mars Oner
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Re: Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

Chava
If I may add one tidbit regarding the PRD "leftist" government of Guererro, Ángel Heladio Aguirre Rivero who was forced to resign after the 43 student issue, was, is and will always be PRI. He switched parties solely for the purpose of opposing his cousin, Manuel Añorve Baños who had received the PRI nomination, so that one member of the family would still have their 'manos en la masa.' Both of them are also related to the governor elect, Héctor Antonio Astudillo Flores. Look for Mr. Aguirre to get a cushy job in the government after things 'settle' down.
DD
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Re: Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

DD
In reply to this post by Mars220
@Mars.  This is a good example of why you should always give credit to the author of a story in a by-line at the top of the story.

I read the whole story thinking that you wrote it and I was thinking WTH, Mars has more sense than this.

Carmen Aristegui is one the bravest journalist in Mexico and so that would make her one of the bravest in the world.  She is not afraid to expose corrupt politicians and corrupt governments.  

The people of Mexico love her for her work.  She probably has the highest rated radio show in Mexico City.  She has received critical acclaim internationally.  

The first thing I did when I saw this was a story from "Examiner", I started researching some about the publication.  To keep this short, I will only post one of the pieces of info I found, but I think it is telling;

When the chief editor of the Examiner was confronted with accusations that a story was plagerized from another source, he said "it is a blog, we don't tell our contributors what to write, and we don't check out the veracity of the story.  He then deleted the questioned article, but said:

"said,the Examiner has "a less-strict standard for accuracy and attribution in stories that appear on the Web" than for publications in print.

Robert Gunnison, director of school affairs at the U.C. Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, shares his own view that newspapers "should observe the same journalism standards online as they do in print."

I then tried to research the author of the story bashing Aristegui, Gabriela Guzman.  The only thing I could find were some other articles she had written and her Facebook and Twitter Accounts.

When I looked for journalistic awards she might have received, I found;
0000

When I made the same search for Carmen Aristegui I found;





Aristegui has received the following awards and honors:

    2001 – National Award for Journalism (shared with Javier Solórzano)[29]
    2002 – Recognized by the Mexican Center for Philanthropy[21]
    2002 – Mexican Press Club, National Journalism Award[21]
    2003 – Named Best National Anchor[21]
    2003 – Public Image Prize for Best Journalist at National Level[30]
    2004 – Mexican Press Club, National Journalism Award[31]
    2004 – National Award for Journalism[32]
    2004 – Mont Blanc Woman of the Year[33]
    2005 – Honored by the National Institute of Indigenous Languages[21]
    2005 – National Award for Journalism[19]
    2006 - Omecihauatl Medal, from the Instituto de las Mujeres-DF[34]
    2006 - Ondas Iberoamericano Radio Prize, for the program Hoy por hoy[35]
    2006 – Mexican Journalism Prize, awarded by the Fifth National Congress of the Federation of Mexican Journalists' Associations, in the category of interviewing[19]
    2008 - María Moors Cabot Prize from the School of Journalism at Columbia University[19]
    2009 – National Award for Journalism[19]
    2010 – National Award for Journalism[36]
    2010 – Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz Prize[27]
    2012 – Named a Chevalier of the French Legion of Honor[37]
    2014 - PEN Mexico Prize[38]

I think I will continue to rely on Carmen for her accurate and courageous journalism as a source of information rather than ...what was her name? ..oh yeah Gabriela Guzman.
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

Mars220
@DD..Nah i don't have time to write articles with all my weed smoking and what not. I always put the link at the end of the articles.
Mars Oner
Jay
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Re: Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

Jay
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Re: Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui sought her own demise

Moros
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