MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

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MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
This post was updated on .
Santiago over on mainboard posted this video, he added english subtitles, it is the interview with mamito, remember they all talk when caught, it means little and should be taken with a large grain of salt.  However, it is pretty riveting none the less.  can anyone ID the accent?  

http://www.universalsubtitles.org/en-gb/videos/2qRxT7lnkYJT/info/PF%20entrevista%20a%20Jes%C3%BAs%20Enrique%20Rej%C3%B3n%20Aguilar%20%22El%20Mamito%22/

when you go on the link click the select language under the video and select english
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7/6/11...added stratfor's 7-6 take on it at bottom of this post...
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I personally think little and temporal at best, however if they do find the stinkin corpse of my husband Lazca, THEN that will have done some damage. This is a good catch however, this guy is a crazy MF  and I mean SCARY CRAZY MF he is said to practice Palo Mayombe, known to use corpse in rituals and suspect of human sacrafices, using body parts for rituals see video below and link..They apprehended with him is Pedro Ortega, who worked as part of the Secretariat of Public Security of Mexico City. DEA had a 5M bounty on mamito's ass, the really bad picture of him in red tone is the pic from DEA website.  The indictment is below and a video in english.  Paz...B


CNN) -- Mexican authorities said Monday that they had arrested a Zetas drug cartel leader who was connected with the killing of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent this year.
Federal police captured Jesus Enrique Rejon Aguilar, known as "El Mamito," Sunday, a top official with the agency said.
Rejon is suspected of being behind numerous deaths in northeastern Mexico, where the Zetas have been engaged in a turf battle with their former allies, the Gulf Cartel.
Rejon was a former member of the Mexican Army's elite forces who deserted in February 1999, according to Ramon E. Pequeno, anti-drug division chief of Mexico's federal police. The following month, he joined the group that founded the Zetas, Pequeno said.
He is also "connected to the attack against agents" of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that killed Agent Jaime Zapata in February, a statement from Mexico's public safety secretary said.
Pequeno said Rejon was in charge of operations for the Zetas in the north central Mexican state of San Luis Potosi when the American agents were ambushed there.
"When [U.S. agent] Jaime Zapata was murdered on February 14, El Mamito was in San Luis Potosi, coordinating actions perpetrated by the Zetas," Pequeno said.
Zapata was killed and another agent injured when they were ambushed on a highway in San Luis Potosi as they traveled from Monterrey to Mexico City. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration had offered a $5 million reward for information leading to Rejon's arrest.
The two were traveling to Mexico City in an armored car with diplomatic plates. They were run off the road and attacked from two vehicles by gunmen who opened fire indiscriminately. It was the first time in 25 years that a U.S. law enforcement agent was killed while on duty in Mexico.
The incident prompted swift action by Mexican authorities and just eight days after the shooting, they announced the arrest of the presumed leader of a group of killers allegedly involved in Zapata's killing, which was apparently carried out by mistake.
Mexican authorities called Rejon "one of the leaders and founders of the Zetas criminal organization."
They said he was the third most powerful leader of the drug cartel, which was created by deserters of the Mexican Army's elite forces.
Rejon is also being investigated for the deaths of dozens of Central and South American migrants whose bodies were found in the northern Mexican state of Tamaulipas at a ranch just 100 miles south of the U.S. border.
Pequeno called Rejon's arrest "a triumph for the Mexican government."
"El Mamito's capture is emblematic because he was one of the original Zetas," he added

english language video:

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/top-zetas-drug-boss-el-mamito-captured/6yjinh7


read indictments here:

http://www.justice.gov/dea/pubs/pressrel/pr091708_TrevinoIndictmentSigned.pdf

Palo Mayombe VooDoo Religion:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5298385438525528418#

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palo_(religion)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19804524


and additional articles here:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ab4_1309803106

http://justiceinmexico.org/2011/07/04/el-mamito-of-los-zetas-is-detained/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/04/mexico-zetas-cartel-lieutenant_n_889754.html

and on 7/6/11 stratfor released this:

Zeta Leader Nabbed

a link to stratfor's interactive map:
http://www1.stratfor.com/images/interactive/Mexico_Weekly_7_6_11.php

On July 3 in Atizapan de Zaragoza, Mexico state, another founding member of Los Zetas was captured by Mexican Federal Police. Jesus “El Mamito” Rejon, a former member of the Mexican army’s Special Forces Airmobile Group (GAFE), deserted the army in 1999 and joined the core group that later became known as Los Zetas. He is known to have been third in the Zeta leadership hierarchy after Heriberto “El Lazca” Lazcano Lazcano and Miguel “Z-40” Trevino Morales, both of whom are still at large.
 
According to statements from the Federal Police, Rejon became responsible for Los Zetas operations in northeastern Mexico shortly after violence erupted in 2010 between the group and the Gulf cartel, its parent organization. Rejon reportedly was in San Luis Potosi when Zeta gunmen ambushed two U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in February 2011 and killed agent Jaime Zapata. It is not clear whether Rejon ordered that attack or was aware at the time that it was being conducted, but his role in the Zeta organization in the region does link him to it. Rejon also is being investigated in connection with mass graves found in San Fernando in April and the execution of 72 Guatemalan migrants in August 2010 in the same area.
 
Los Zetas have taken hits to their leadership over the years, as cartel battles and Mexican military or law enforcement actions have resulted in the killing or capture of nearly three-fourths of the original group of 31 “Zetas Viejos.” But it is important to note that those losses have not diminished the organization’s reach or its operational principles, which are based on the original group’s military and special operations training. Certainly there has been evidence at the foot-soldier level of a reduced level of training, discipline and command and control, such as the Falcon Lake shooting in September 2010. Overall, however, the Los Zetas organization remains large, powerful, self-regenerating and self-correcting.

In other words, it would be a mistake to view El Mamito’s take-down as a significant weakening of Los Zetas, although if he chooses to be cooperative he would be quite a treasure-trove of actionable intelligence for the Mexican government. STRATFOR will follow this situation closely for signs that Mexico is indeed exploiting this resource.


Threats Against U.S. Citizens
 

Over the last week in northern Mexico, several threats that specifically target U.S. citizens came to light. After five banners appeared June 30 around the city of Juarez in Chihuahua state threatening Gov. Cesar Duarte and accusing his administration of protecting the Sinaloa Federation, graffiti was found in Chihuahua City, the capital of Chihuahua state, threatening to decapitate agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Other threats surfaced that prompted the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Webb County Sheriff’s Office in Laredo, Texas, to issue warnings against travel to Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, over the July 4 holiday weekend.

The narco-messages in Chihuahua state were explicitly worded threats, and while no evidence of written threats was reported in relation to the Nuevo Laredo travel warning, the security conditions in Tamaulipas indicate that extreme caution is warranted. Sources associated with U.S. law enforcement agencies have indicated that the threats are considered credible and specific enough to be taken very seriously. What STRATFOR finds significant about these threats is that a certain point may have been reached, particularly in Tamaulipas, in which the cost-benefit ratio of attacking U.S. citizens may have tipped in the cartels’ favor. When threats of this sort have been made in the past, the cartels have not followed through for fear of generating too much U.S. attention. But current conditions in Tamaulipas are such that targeting Americans could prove beneficial to the cartels — or at least they may perceive it to be so.

For one thing, the threat could force the Mexican government to reverse the recent military takeover of all law enforcement functions in 22 of the cities in Tamaulipas (including Nuevo Laredo). There are likely large numbers of local police officers who were on cartel payrolls and have been relieved of their official duties. While most of these cartel assets remain at large, they no longer are privy to government information or possess government-issued firearms. Regional news organizations, both north and south of the border, have indicated that the likely intent behind the threat in Tamaulipas is to create an overwhelming security condition that would force the government to reinstate the local police officers in the 22 cities in order to have the manpower to deal with the cartels. This would result in many of the police officers who had been co-opted by the cartels being brought back to their posts, which the cartels would obviously want.

Regarding the threats against U.S. DEA agents operating in Chihuahua state, two points should be made. First, while the narcomantas that threatened that state’s governor were signed by La Linea, the enforcer element of the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes cartel (aka the Juarez cartel), the spray-painted graffiti aimed squarely at DEA “Gringos” was not signed. That message, translated, read: “[expletive deleted] Gringos (D.E.A.), we know where you are and we know who you are and where you go. We are going to chop off your [expletive deleted] heads.” Second, because the graffiti was not signed, it raises the question of who wrote it and why.
 
Our working theory is that the message threatening the DEA was left by La Linea. La Linea has been hit hard over the past few years by both aggression from the Sinaloa Federation and government pressure. However, while they are down they are not yet out and like a wounded animal, could still prove to be quite dangerous.

For these reasons, STRATFOR is taking these latest threats seriously and will continue to try to determine their veracity. We recommend that Americans living in or traveling to these areas error on the side of caution.
June 27

 Eighty undocumented migrants from Central American countries were kidnapped in southern Mexico. On board a train heading from Oaxaca to Veracruz, the migrants were abducted by armed men wearing ski masks.
Approximately 700 municipal police officers protested the presence of the Mexican army in Nuevo Laredo.
Gunmen shot and killed two people after entering bar in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state. The gunmen escaped while engaging in a firefight with municipal police near the bar.
The alleged Los Zetas boss in Quintana Roo state, Javier Altamirano Terrones aka El Pelon, was detained in Cancun, Quintana Roo state, in a joint operation by the Mexican navy, army and Federal Police.
Unidentified gunmen shot and killed Santa Catarina police chief German Perez at his office in Santa Catarina, Nuevo Leon state. Seven police officers near the scene at the time of the shooting were arrested June 28 in connection with the killing.
 

June 28
 The Mexican military discovered an underground drug lab in San Antonio, Sinaloa state. The lab occupied two floors and was equipped with an elevator and a ventilation system. Military officials discovered 260 kilograms (about 573 pounds) of methamphetamine as well as chemicals and equipment for manufacturing the drug.
A federal court issued a 40-day curfew through the Office for Special Investigations on Organized Crime to be imposed against 24 police officers in Tarimbaro, Michoacan state. The officers are suspected of having links to La Familia Michoacana.

June 29
 The Mexican military clashed with gunmen linked to organize crime in Villarin, Veracruz state. At least three gunmen were killed and five more were detained during the confrontation.

June 30
 An elite police unit was ambushed by armed men along Highway 15 in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state. One police officer was killed and six were wounded in the ensuing firefight.
Five dead bodies were discovered by police on a street in Juarez, Chihuahua state. More than 20 spent shell casings were also found on the street.
The director of municipal police in Turicato, Michoacan state, was arrested by the Mexican army for extortion of the local population. The director was in possession of marijuana and firearms when he was detained.
The Mexican military killed a Los Zetas boss in Garcia, Nuevo Leon state, about 30 kilometers (18 miles) from Monterrey. Hernando Rodriguez Hernandez, aka El Fabuloso, was in charge of Zeta operations in several municipalities in Nuevo Leon.


July 1
 A firefight erupted between the Mexican navy and as many as 250 gunmen likely linked to Los Zetas in Fresnillo, Zacatecas state, leaving at least 13 gunmen killed. The gunmen had used vehicles to establish roadblocks throughout the city.


July 2
 At least 40 gunmen attacked a police headquarters in Morelia, Michoacan state, arriving in more than 10 vehicles and using grenades and small arms. Three of the gunmen were killed and two were detained while three policemen were wounded.


July 3
 A founding member and third in command of Los Zetas, Jesus “El Mamito” Rejon, was detained by Mexican police in Mexico City. Rejon is linked to the killing of two U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers in February.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

AllseeingI
Banned User
With all due respect you are stepping across the line when you try to dignosis him. Report the facts. Your education does not include a ph.D
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
Hi Allseeing1

I see you are back on track.  and back to your original name.  You should know when you switch it up it changes on your old posts.

Paz
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Capjim
Banned User
This post was updated on .
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

AllseeingI
Banned User
Her she goes off on another paranoid tangent. She doesn't live in Mexico. She is a fraud. She lives her life on the internet and has convinced you people that she has cred. I have nothing else to say about her.
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
Guess you have missed what has been written about me on mainboard.
Don't be a dumbass why would anyone pretend to live and work in Mx?
Damn I must be good!  You have done some strange things in the past
changing your handle to post a compliment to your intelligence, not knowing
it displays on your past posts.  I always thought you were Swanka, still may be
but it does not matter.

Here is an article Ovemex wrote about my Mier Refugee Project  I tried to change
the names a bit but here at BB everyone new of my project.  Ovemex help tremendously
with the successful project, and helps with other projects as well.  He has met most
people in my foundation, but I suppose you think he and the other reporters are fraud
and liars also...you should stop speaking out your ass.  I find that those who cannot believe
there are people in the world that not only care about others, but do something to help, I find
those people are unhappy and lonely and bitter.  

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/11/benitos-story-planting-seeds-of-hope-in.html

and read the comments in this post..

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/11/11-zetas-killed-tamaulipas.html

I will not ever post the name of the city I am in.  Your an idiot if you cannot figure out why.  I have disclosed I am in Coahuila, for almost 8 years.  I have also disclosed I was diagnosed with cancer 20 mos ago and returned to California for several surgeries and treatments only leaving twice AMA.  My last surgery was 8 weeks ago and we thought I was cured, unfortunately I will have one more in a few weeks then I can return to Mexico.  I am fortunate to have a great staff and we video conference and in contact constantly via skype, not quite the same but effective and I still put in 8-10 hrs of work per day in my office in calif.
I don't know what your problem is, but if you care about Mexico please consider helping in some way, I think you will feel better about life and yourself.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Bones
In reply to this post by AllseeingI
AllseeingI wrote
With all due respect you are stepping across the line when you try to dignosis him. Report the facts. Your education does not include a ph.D

Stepping across the line? And what line is that? Douche. If you cant spell diagnosis i dont know if i want to hear what you have to say
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

El Profe
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

imjustagirl
In reply to this post by Chivis
Yeah, you!
I am a cancer survivor, and managing work, family and health is not as easy as we make it seem ;) Keep up the good work and faith in others!
Lots of respect,
Imjustagirl
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Bones
Thanks Bones, I don't know what I ahve done to have this lady/man dog me aka Blog-Stalk me but looks like Jeffe Buggs has peace under control, I think he wants to nip it in the bud.

 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by imjustagirl
Hola JAG
Congratulations!  They caught mine fairly early from my annual testing, my mother died from the same type.  No juglling everything is difficult especially when feeling lousy from treatment, but on the other hand it keeps the mind occupied.  I told Buggs BB has been a great help to keep my mind busy, if not for C I most likely would not have joined the BB family.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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MORE INFO POSTED.. Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chivis
I added a lengthy article from Stratfor just released and their interactive map...on my post at bottom..
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chivis
interview of mamito's interview with eng subs i just posted at the beginning of this post
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Birria De Chivo
 Thank you, ma'am!
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Re: MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Chivis
Administrator
my pleasure!
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: MAMITO SPEAKS; VIDEO IN SUBTITLES..Capture of El Mamito..what does it mean?

Viva Paz!
I can't believe such a hardened killer like "El Mamito" would almost tear up when talking about missing his mother. Brings the quote to mind, "Even their mothers don't love them" referencing to "El Barbie" when asked about a Beltran-Levya/Last letter alliance.
"Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far." -West African Proverb