La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

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La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

leChef


Elements of the Attorney General of the Republic ( FGR ) arrested at dawn on Friday in this city to one of the leaders of the Gulf Cartel.

The unit identified the capo as Gerardo Meade Benavides , alias "La Perra", who by the way had several arrest warrants for the crimes of kidnapping.

It was also established that he belonged to a faction known as "Los Ciclones" and that he is part of that criminal group that operates in Matamoros , Tamaulipas .

The Attorney General of Tamaulipas (PGJT) just over a month ago offered to pay a reward of two million pesos to who gave reliable information on the whereabouts of "La Perra".

The prosecution also opened several investigative folders for the crimes of extortion and criminal association, since "La Perra" led several stoppages in public transport.

Even the one now detained when summoning to taxi drivers and peseras to a strike left without urban transport to Matamoros in full elections to choose to the local deputies, the past 2 of June.

Meade Benavides also in previous strikes blocked with its transport units mainly "pirate" taxis all border bridges, which caused tremendous traffic chaos.

It was the FGR's own elements who moved "La Perra" to the border city of Matamoros , where it was handed over to the state authorities that will determine their legal status.

Source:
http://www.info7.mx/nacional/detienen-a-gerardo-meade-pieza-clave-del-cartel-del-golfo/2561333
MX
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

MX
Thanks for sharing. That was a quick turnaround from the time his bounty was announced.

La Perra has a brother named Juan Enrique Meade Benavides. I asked around and just heard he was a former drug addict.

https://www.facebook.com/lic.juanenriquemeade

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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

leChef
Is his brother really a lawyer? Lic means that, right?
MX
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

MX
No. As far as I know, he sold insurance with his dad and then moved on to other jobs once his dad passed away. Licenciado comes from the word "Licenciatura", which can roughly translate to "Bachelor's degree".

Example: Tengo una licenciatura en Ciencas Políticas / I have a bachelor's degree in Political Science.

It doesn't make much sense when you try to translate "El Licenciado" to English. In Mexico, graduating from college means you are legally a "Licenciado" (unless you studied a technical field, which will make you an "Ingeniero").
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

leChef
Thanks, MX. That is clarifying. Is it normal for people to front their bachelor's degree in front of their name (lic) or is that just lame?

Also, what do people with master's degree call themselves?
MX
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

MX
This post was updated on .
"Licenciado" is very common in Mexico. However, whether or not people call you "Licenciado" really depends on the work environment you're in. For example, if you work in a multinational corporation where pretty much everyone has to have a bachelor's degree to work there, the title will rarely be used when referring to someone in a normal conversation. You will still see it in writing, especially in legal documents, but that's about it. Now, that's not to say that college-educated people will never refer to others as "Licenciado". In affluent circles, some college-educated people may sometimes refer to other college-educated (but prominent) people as "Licenciado". Examples can include distinguished lawyers or businessmen.

On the other hand, if you work in an environment where not everyone has a bachelor's degree, you may be frequently referred to as "Licenciado", especially if you hold a management position and/or when someone from a lower position speaks to you. It's important to keep in mind that most people in Mexico do not have a college degree, so going to college in Mexico already puts you in a select group. Some people don't realize this because they are surrounded by an environment of people with college degrees, but the reality is that most Mexicans don't have access to higher education, unlike the U.S. I grew up close to the U.S. so I don't like being called "Licenciado". I find it a bit tacky. But a lot of people think differently.

When someone has a Master's degree, they are referred to as "Maestro". There is a clear distinction in Mexico between "Profesor" and "Maestro". Technically speaking, a teacher who has a Master's degree is a "Maestro". If you have a Master's degree, you can write it as "Maestro Juan Meade" or as "Juan Meade, Maestro en X". (Update) A lot of teachers will call themselves "Maestro" when they're not technically one. So I've also seen people with Master's degree use "Magister" instead. Or use the English word "Máster" (with the accent) when referring to themselves or others with Master's degrees.
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

leChef
A special thanks to you, MX. One don't need a master in detectivism to see that you are an academic (although I already knew that)
MX
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Re: La Perra CDG priority objective arrested

MX
Ha!  No problem, leChef. Happy to clarify!