Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

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Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

Feynman
DD
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

DD
Administrator
@Feyman.  It is a good article.  It  was also good the first time it was posted on Thursday by Nuttz.
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

Pinchegringo
DD wrote
@Feyman.  It is a good article.  It  was also good the first time it was posted on Thursday by Nuttz.
lol DD out in full force!  Why aren't you an Admin anymore anyway? Did you quit? Someone (maybe you) mentioned that Chivis was the only Mod now.
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

1966tinman
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Feynman
It has been my personal experience living in Mexico off and on for the past 40 years that the average Mexican citizen is very aware of the institutionalized corruption present in every aspect of Mexican society .  I have family and friends who rail against the corruption , yet will gladly pay a bribe to facilitate a transaction that will serve their personal interest . I am guilty of paying such bribes myself . Ms. Anabel Hernandez's accusations that are detailed in books and articles are not shocking considering  Mexicans are desensitized by , complacent about  , and active participants in the corruption that surrounds their daily lives .
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

canadiana
Administrator
yeah Tinman it can work in your personal favour corruption.I once paid a $40 bribe on a Mexicans suggestion to get a Mexican motorcycle licence on a boyfriend that had a little mishap on my motorcycle to be able to collect on the $500 damage claim but when it comes to deliberately on the take for a bribe it goes overboard;like bogus charges by the cops,fees to operate a legitimate business or bogus set ups that's when it crosses the line and sounds like its a little too rampant in Mexico.
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

jlopez
In reply to this post by Feynman
What's important to remember, the "take away", in neo-speak, is that in Mexico the corruption comes from the top down. That's why it is so institutionalized and embedded ("arraigado" would be the most accurate term, although the word is also Mexican legal jargon). In Mexico, it does no good to complain because even the watchdog agencies that are supposed to protect against corruption are themselves corrupt. A perfect example is the federal elections commission that was supposed to insure that elections were conducted fairly, but that served only to provide EPN/PRI with cover for extensive election fraud.

Since the corruption is from the top down, a complaint generally results in retaliation against the complainant. The head of an agency, whether law enforcement or bureaucracy, needs to keep the cash flowing and a complainant is seen as a risk. This is why Mexicans do not complain.

There is some degree of corruption in every country in the world, but a general rule appears to be that the more authoritarian, or less democratic, a country is, the greater the level of corruption. Unfortunately for Mexico, the return of the PRI is the return of traditional authoritarianism. I have always believed that technology is a double-edged sword. While technology can provide greater access to information, and potentially greater transparency in government, it also allows a government-- the NSA is a good example-- more intrusion into a citizen's privacy. Nobody recognizes this better than the PRI, which is why the recent constitutional "reforms" now give the Mexican government a great deal of power to control the flow of information over the Internet. In fact, the PRI can now censor Internet communications to a greater extent than is possible in any other democratic country. I personally believe that they were advised by the Chinese government in drafting the new laws.

So, before being too critical of the endemic corruption (what's not to criticize?), remember that Mexicans lack the tools that we in the U.S. take for granted in attacking corruption. As I have stated earlier, the Internet and the autodefensas represented the most realistic hope for democracy in Mexico. Clearly, the PRI agrees with me, which explains Dr. Mireles and the recent constitutional reforms.

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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

tuSancho
In reply to this post by 1966tinman
This is so true and well stated, 1966.  And when in Rome... those of us who live in Mexico have to go along; it's how things are done.  Traffic cops can be backed down but other than that it is tough to negotiate life in Mexico with out participating.  Those who say they don't, must live in some parallel universe in a basement in Kansas.
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

tuSancho
In reply to this post by jlopez
"As I have stated earlier, the Internet and the autodefensas represented the most realistic hope for democracy in Mexico. Clearly, the PRI agrees with me, which explains Dr. Mireles and the recent constitutional reforms."

Clearly!  ;-) wink  
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

Mexico-Watcher
In reply to this post by Feynman
Chin-Ga-Oh! This is one great thread.  

I found the article very informative and our BB posters' comments added confirmation on how corrupt Mexico "continues" to be.  This kind of systemic "caca" is as old as Mejico itself as history shows.

Imo, systemic corruption, like a parasite (gusano), infects Mexico through and through and there are no poisons powerful enough to kill it because the Mexican power elite  will not allow it.  By "power elite" I include the people and families in the legit upper world, as well as those living in the shadowy or criminal (underworld) institutions. That gusano will not be killed it is just too beneficial to many Mexicans who know how to exploit its kindness and largess ..... Even the lowly taco vendor feeds the gusano.... Everyone feeds the damned creature!  

Ordinary Mexicans will just have to cope with this reality for years to come.... Those that benefit from the gusano's voracious appetite will not allow their benefactor to be harmed or killed.  

 Essentially, what I say above is why Dr. Mireles, is in prison. Why Anabel Hernandez is in hiding in fear for her life.  

With the now, certified parasitic relationships between the power elites and the underworld, I'd like to close by quoting Anabel Hernandez (from the article cited here):

"....
What I have learned in nine years of investigation into drug trafficking is that a general, a public security secretary or a governor is more dangerous than Chapo Guzman himself. They are the ones that betray the country, that sell the state to organized crime and they should face exemplary punishments.

… If there are no exemplary punishments against the Mexican political and business class who permit people like Chapo Guzman to exist, then nothing is going to change and we are just going to be repeating this story of death, sometimes with more violence, sometimes with less, but always with the Mexican state under control of drug traffickers. We have to break this cycle."

Mexico-Watcher

 
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

1966tinman
In reply to this post by Feynman
I learned about bribes and corruption as a child from watching my relatives and neighbors  interact . Problems with public services like water, electricity , trash removal  , medical services , and school  were  easily solved with the payment of bribes ( mordidas )  or the use of influence . My grandfather was a top ranking PRI party official in my city and wielded considerable power and influence . One of my young  aunts was a sort of left-wing socialist who criticized the government and the PRI at every turn . Yet she when she and her husband , another leftist , would run in to problems they would use bribes and my grandfather's influence to solve their dilemmas .  I see this  behavior as a sort of " necessary evil " that is engrained in Mexican society . And like I've said in an earlier post , I have taken part and am as guilty as any of my fellow Mexicans in participating in this never-ending bribing and corruption system .
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Re: Journalist Anabel Hernandez who accuses Mexican presidents of links to drug cartels

tuSancho
Corruption and bribery of officials seems to be the only stable and long lasting institution in Mexico.  It survives all political storms.