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In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

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In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mica
This post was updated on .
MexicoDaily News & El Universal (sp)


Letica Rodriguez Lara aka Doña Lety aka La 40, police officer turned cartel boss.

There are no more “gentlemen’s agreements” between authorities and criminal groups in Quintana Roo, a change that has led to increased violence as the latter fight over lucrative territory for drug dealing and extortion.

A federal report obtained by the newspaper El Universal also revealed that an independent gang, referred to as the Cártel de Cancún and integrated by several former judicial officials and members of various other criminal groups, has under its control the nightclubs, bars and hotels in the hotel zone of Cancún, in Puerto Morelos, Alfredo V. Bonfil and Isla Mujeres.

The cartel, said to be headed by former Federal Police officer Leticia Rodríguez Lara, is now attempting to move into Playa del Carmen.

Doña Lety or La 40 as the gang leader is known is believed to have controlled the drug trade in the north of Quintana Roo for at least five years, and has also succeeded in infiltrating police forces and the state Attorney General’s office.

In November Rodríguez, 48,  recruited a senior official from that office who is now her chief enforcer, the report said, noting that “not only has the Attorney General’s office been infiltrated but it looks as if no one wants to investigate her and much less catch her.”

However, the gang has not been happy with that office’s recent changes in middle and senior management, presumably because some of the people who had been moved out were on its payroll.

All this has not gone unnoticed by Los Zetas, one of four gangs with a presence in the state, the others being Los Pelones, Cártel del Golfo and Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación.

The Zetas have been sidelined in recent years but are now moving to regain lost territory by going up against Doña Lety, the report suggests.

There is a theory that the shootings in Cancún a week ago were triggered by the Zetas, who released information alleging that the Cártel de Cancún boss had been detained by police. Cartel members, believing the information, reacted and attacked the Attorney General’s office in that city.

Official figures from some years ago would indicate that the region’s drug market is worth US $1.5 billion annually, says a researcher at the Autonomous University of Quintana Roo who also believes Mexico must act and get to the root of the problem if it wishes to avoid becoming a failed state.

Juan Carlos Arriaga Rodríguez said Mexico is going through a process similar to what was seen in Colombia and warned that there is currently no light at the end of the tunnel.

“The breakdown of the Mexican political system is tremendous; never in history has there been so much corruption . . . .” he said, claiming authorities are living in a world of illusion in which governability is at risk due to the absence of a clear plan with realistic objectives.

Worries about increased violence will lead to a growing perception of insecurity, Arriaga said, observing that such perceptions were rare in the past because the government could control the information that was published.

But with social networks that kind of control is impossible today, he said.

The researcher said there is no “magic recipe” to address the situation, but pointed to criteria such as the professionalization of security forces, the impartation of justice, realistic plans and citizen participation as necessary elements.

Official response to the shootings in Cancún and those the day before in Playa del Carmen has been to send in more Federal Police.

Many of those will be housed in a new police headquarters in Playa del Carmen, a 2.8-million-peso facility whose first stone was laid Saturday.

El Universal reported that more than 250 Federal Police were deployed to the state last year, 100 to Chetumal and 150 to Cancún. But they were later shipped off to Chiapas, leaving Quintana Roo without federal security.


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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
This post was updated on .

Adriana (fictional) is the girl on the right as she might look on a Cancun Spring Break.

Below is a fictional CANCUN SPRING BREAK scenario for you to describe what you would do as a Mexican employee of Adrian's family.  
============

O.K. Adriana, is an intelligent, adventurous trusting soul, that "loves all people."  She is a liberal arts student at a very exclusive Ivy League college in Massachusetts.  She is sophisticated and well traveled to places like Europe, Hawaii, and Japan. She is a volunteer in a project that helps the homeless. Volunteer work is a long nobles oblige family tradition.
 
When she graduates with an MBA, next year, she is going to be a partner the family's real estate enterprises.  Her older brother is a lawyer and well positioned Democrat who is planning to run for Mayor.  
Mom and dad are justifiably very proud of their kids.

Adriana and three of her girlfriends have booked "high end" hotel accommodations in Cancun, and will take side trips to see Mayan archaeological sites during their week-long Spring Break.  Among themselves, the girls kid around about "going wild and crazy" like their forerunners on Cancun spring Breaks.  Their "girl talk is somewhat "giggly" salacious about their coming trip.... "twerking to hot cumbias and getting wild and crazy, in their minds.... stories to tell and happy memories for a lifetime."

Your challenge:
Now, you are, Jose, an undocumented and worldly 35 year old Mexican from Yucatan.  You speak and understands English well because you've lived in places like Los Angeles, Phoenix, Denver, and Chicago. A few of your friends have been involved in smuggling people, drugs, and money. You do not do drugs, but know a great deal about them and the nasty realities that surround illicit drugs.  For many reasons, you hide what you know to not attract attention.  You avoid mannerisms, language, or dress that could link you to dishonesty or crime.  You are Catholic, always wear a crucifix, and are a good and decent hard working person.  

 You have worked for Adrian's family as a landscaper for 4 years and like the family very much.  Adriana, once in awhile slips you $100 just for washing and detailing her Beamer.  

You have the picture. Is there a problem(s) here?
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mica
@Mexico-Watcher sorry I don't understand the puzzle or see the relevance.
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

SinaloenseFourTwenty
In reply to this post by Mexico-Watcher
CONTENTS DELETED
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
In reply to this post by Mica
Mica wrote
@Mexico-Watcher sorry I don't understand the puzzle or see the relevance.
 That is fair.  
Thanks for your feedback.

Mexico-Watcher
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
In reply to this post by SinaloenseFourTwenty
SinaloenseFourTwenty wrote
We've all experimented with drugs, some indulge a little too much.
Fair enough, amigo.  But think of the original story that started this thread.
My explanation of where I'm coming  from will appear in a couple of days after I get a few more responses.

BTW: The scenario I painted has no right or wrong answers. I only asks that you imagine yourself as Jose,  a worldly and decent Mexican working for a wealthy "gringo" family with a daughter who plans a Spring Break "fling" in Cancun with her girlfriends.  
Mexico-Watcher

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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

jlopez
In reply to this post by Mica
Mica: The Leticia Rodriguez in the YouTube video is not Dona Lety. The lady in the video is Cuban, with a strong Cuban accent, talking about the death of Cuban radio and TV personality, Ado Sanz,  
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mexico-Watcher
MW-He's going to tell her to be careful down there.How much he elaborates on that who knows depending on if he's from the area and whether they talk much on a human level rather then strictly an employee level.
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mica
In reply to this post by jlopez
Thanks @JLOPEZ, I will remove the video.
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by canadiana
canadiana wrote
MW-He's going to tell her to be careful down there.How much he elaborates on that who knows depending on if he's from the area and whether they talk much on a human level rather then strictly an employee level.
Canadiana: Congratulations!!!.

Again, you have shown your travel wisdom.  Your concern for the "gringita" from a wealthy family is right on target.  I feel that you would give Adriana an extended friendly education about traveling in Mexico.

You are awarded a free tire rotation, car wash, and oil change at Johnny's Garage on any Tuesday between 7 A.M. and noon.  There is TV and instant coffee, and some magazines in the waiting room. The bathroom is unisex and you'll see my name carved over the empty condom dispenser. Johnny's Garage is just off I-15 in Parowan, UT next to the UHaul.
Give Johnny this passphrase to claim your prize: "Chingao, tengo muchas ganas."
=============================

 For all you other readers, here are the basic reasons Canadiana won the contest.

1. Perfect target. Adriana's personal profile of an adventurous, trusting, liberal, college girl from a wealthy family show that she is a potential "target" for kidnapping, rape, theft, robberies, extortion scams, and other forms of mischief.  Spring Break in Cancun is a special season for "pollitos" from America to be plucked by Mexican deviants and criminals in various guises.  Young Spring Breakers tend to be careless and clueless in their goals of having a wild and crazy time.   How do I know?  I was one myself many years ago.

2. The story of Leticia, the narco-cartel "chingona" and former cop shows the "dark " and important side of  Cancun that most tourists are ignorant of.... a dark side with many facets.  

3. About kidnapping.  Kidnapping is a criminal specialty involving teams of experts to pull off.  Usually there is a powerful mastermind who employs: (1)people skilled in identifying "wealthy" targets; (2) seducing or coercing the target to the kidnapping site; (3) pick-up and transporting to the safe house; (4) housing the victim under contrived conditions; (5) communications experts to frighten loved ones to pay ransom, not call law enforcement,and arrange how money is to be delivered.  Victims of kidnapping (and other crimes) in Mexico soon learn NOT to expect much help from Mexican law enforcement.

4. So you won't think I am a paranoid flake, here is a website that contains a good variety of stories of  bad trips to Cancun.   Be aware that for every story, there may be a hundred never published.  

http://mexicovacationawareness.com/mexicostory.html 

P.S. My son and his wife went to Cancun a year ago and had a wonderful time.  Prior to his trip I spent time explicitly forewarning him and turned him onto the above website .  I would have felt terribly remiss had I not done so.  



 

       


J
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

J
In reply to this post by Mica
A girl friend of mine was in Playa Del Carmen, across from the Blue Parrot when the shooting happened....She is 29, hairstylist, and into the party scene and can handle herself well enough.  First time in Mexico, besides Tijuana.  She was telling me a story of one night, where she was lost from her group, wearing basically a bikini, and wandering around the beaches in the early morning hours....

I was explaining to her, casually, that she really doesn't understand how dangerous of a situation that can be.  That's essentially somewhat risky behavior anywhere, but people really don't get, how different the dynamics are over there. It's not alarmist, or sensationalized.  But, they are still playing by 'American' rules.  

They don't realize if you are sexually assaulted, kidnapped, killed, there will be no one to turn to.  Someone rapes you in an alley, and what is there to  be done?  If you get kidnapped, no one will rescue you. The police can't, and won't help you.  Neither can the PGR.  They don't grasp the impunity in which groups like the Cartel de Cancun,  or Los Zetas operate in these areas.  The insecurity of a third world country, in places infested with narcos is really beyond comprehension for people who didn't grow up in it, or understand it fully.  
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mexico-Watcher
MW-That's quite the website.I read everyone of those short stories over 2 nights.Anyone who is a traveller like myself they owe it to themselves to read this.Thanks for posting this MW.Invaluable!Seems like a lot of medical scams.Someone once said on here that the medical is the least corrupt but I think every institution there is suspect.These are resorts for the masses from around the world so sounds like a certain quota is targeted and they are getting away with it.I'm sure most of the resorts are 'laundered' money so they don't care if they lose a certain amount of business there's always 'many for the taking.'A news story on the national news here 2 days ago was an 18 year with her boyfriend in Cancun from Winnipeg.A hotel staff tried to sexually assault her in an isolated place at the resort.Next day her and her boyfriend went to file a report against the hotel employee.They both were thrown in jail and 'extorted' for $400 US if they didn't want to spend another 3 days in jail.                                                                  Lots of date rape drugs causing blackouts in the stories.My 17 year old son went to P.V. at graduation 5 years ago.Don't know the name of the resort but it was 1 of 3 that were isolated a little from P.V.He partied with 1 of the bartenders on his night off and told my son they often put the date rape drugs in tourist's drinks.[there right from the horse's mouth,bartenders do drug tourists drinks]1 of the high school kids was hospitalized with a $2500 bill.There was insurance but
apparently insurance wouldn't cover it because it was a drug even though the kid didn't do it.                      I thought maybe my days on road trips were over down there and good all inclusive resorts would be the way to go but I don't know about that.It doesn't look promising.
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
Canadiana:  Thanks for reading the stories of tourism in Mexico.  To me the link between Dona Lety, Zetas, corrupt law enforcement, medical, transportation, and sundry vicious people who cheat, drug, rob, and rape tourists in Cancun is clear.  Dona Lety , the former cop, symbolically and "actually" serves as an ideal icon for the evils coursing through Cancun.

Mexico is slowly killing its tourist industry and poisoning its own people with a complex of evil values that would make Santa Muerte proud.  Would you trust the taco or the cocktail served you in Cancun like you did before reading the horror stories?  Would you trust the taxi driver, like before? The hotel staff? Doctors and nurses?  And, would you trust the cops?

 About kidnapping and my little puzzle scenario of affluent Adriana and her girlfriends going on Spring Break  to Cancun with the intentions of having a "fling".   IMO, these girls might as well have neon signs their bikinis that flashes huge dollar signs for extortionists and kidnappers.  Kidnapping rings know how to identify targets and get vital information needed for a hefty ransom and successful "job."   IMO: kidnappings of wealthy tourists is way under reported because the victim and their families are rendered frozen with fear.      

Canadiana, I hope others do as you did and take the trouble to educate themselves about tourism in  corrupt Mexico. I know you will share what you learned with friends who are potential "pollitos"  
Mexico-Watcher
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

canadiana
Administrator
It's funny it used to be the other way around.I would spend hours convincing people how wonderful Mexico was and 2 years ago was going to start up a tour business in Baja running motorcycle tours down there.The 1 thing that stopped me was liability after talking to Dave who rents Harley's out of the Marina in Cabo.Another thing was that I couldn't hire a Mexican chase driver according to the insurance companies there.Good thing I didn't start up as La Paz and Cabo are clusterf**ks now and Loreto had 3 murders today [population only 10,000 or less] and there's lots of thugs in Mulege and between the lonely road from Cuidad Constitucion to La Paz;just ripe for the taking.Times have changed.No longer are tourists off limits.In winter in Baja there's tons of RVers that have been travelling the peninsula every year for eons.I wonder if they still do that?Well I'm glad I got to travel to Veracruz,Michoacan and Guerrero while it was 'relatively' safe.I wanted to do it again at retirement but it's a 'no go'.Just don't want to be at the wrong place at the wrong time or mistaken for a rival or DEA.Definitley not worth it.
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Re: In Quintana Roo, its Doña Lety vs. Zetas

Mexico-Watcher
Canadiana:  Education is a wonderful thing ....

I too, traveled extensively in Mexico long ago when you could sleep on the beaches and stop anywhere for a nice time among good people.  Used to visit Ensenada for fishing about 4X a year with my co-workers.  I loved the archaeological sites of Tenochitlan, Palenque, and elsewhere.  Tasco and Acapulco were awesome vacation spots.   Lake Chapala, Ocotlan, Guadalajara, Tlaquepaque were fantastic!  Oaxaca, Vera  Cruz, Tampico, Leon, Guanajuato were wonderful.  Mexico City was great for its history and museum... but depressing for its vast poverty abreast exclusive neighborhoods of incredible wealth ... and everywhere signs of racism against "indios".  Tiajuana and Juarez were notorious faux Mexico "toilets" ... and still are today.  

Well, today I would NOT risk going to Mexico and would instead spend my frijoles like in Japan, Italy, Spain, Argentina, and even Russia.

Canadiana: Don't forget to pick up your prize at Johnny's Garage in Utah.

Mexico-Watcher





 

   
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