Guerrero 2020

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Guerrero 2020

Parro
Today, a journalist is shot dead in Ciudad Altamirano while in a hammock at car wash, waiting for his car to be serviced.  His name, Cecilia Pinenda Birto, founder of La Voz de Tierra Caliente.  He was shot with 10 bullets.

Pinenda received regular death threats for years, and escaped an attempt on his life in 2015 at his home.  

Carlos Lauria, senior program coordinator for the Americas at the US based Committee to Protect Journalists, is working to document the case

"“Mexico is clearly the worst, most dangerous place for journalists in the Western Hemisphere,” Lauria said. “And what makes it worse is the impunity surrounding most of these cases that perpetuates a climate of violence where journalists are left wide open to attacks.”

Ciudad Altamirano is in one of the most conflicted parts of Guerrero, an area where heroin-producing poppy crops are grown in a region disputed by several drug gangs. Recently some of the most serious fighting has been between members of La Familia cartel and a group known as Los Tequileros.

Citizen self-defense militias have also taken up arms in the area to try to protect themselves from kidnappings and killings, and government security forces have deployed a strong presence in the area.

Source:  https://livingstonledger.com/mexico-journalist-shot-dead-in-troubled-guerrero-state/

 
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Chava
Thank you Parro for continuing on..........
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Re: Guerrero 2020

.
In reply to this post by Parro
Unfortunate and sad. He let his guard down and probably knew better. Thanks Parro.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
First Chava,

Secondly, Patole is very sad.  We've known from at least a century in the past, who runs the news, runs the thoughts.  Once you have someone, who cuts through the disinformation and reports the actual news?  your life is in danger, especially journalists in Mexico.

That's why we have this post, real news, revealing the criminals, expose those who want to sway your mind and most the heinous crimes to sow fear and suppress honest reporting.

I'm honored to keep this post running Chava and Infohiker and now Patole. We must expose the germ that is the violent cartel and their corrupt marketing.  Whether in disguise as Santa Claus, or storm troopers, we know they not only want to control the needy, the mainstream people and the dishonest news.

I hope they all go to hell!  It can be so much better.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
NOT GUERRERO, NATIONAL:

So many journalists are being killed in Mexico that one newspaper decides to shut down
Posted by SDD Contributor on December 17, 2019 at 4:04 pm

A Mexican newspaper is shutting down because the country has become too dangerous for journalists, according to its owner.

In an editorial published Sunday on the front page of the Norte newspaper in the border city of Juarez, owner Oscar Cantu Murguia said a string of deadly assaults on journalists is “preventing us from continuing freely with our work.

“Dear reader, I am writing to inform you that I have taken the decision to close because, among other things, there are no guarantees nor the security to exercise critical, counterweight journalism,” he wrote.

The newspaper had apparently been suffering financially, but Cantu said it was the , one of at least five Mexican journalists targeted by violence last month, that prompted him to close it.

Breach, who covered drug cartels and corruption stories for Norte, along with the much bigger La Jornada newspaper, was gunned down outside her home in the city of Chihuahua. A sign left at the crime scene said “tattletale.”

On March 19, columnist Ricardo Monlui, who worked for El Sol de Cordoba, was shot twice as he left a restaurant with his wife and son in the Gulf Coast state of Veracruz. On March 2, Cecilio Pineda Birto, a freelancer and the founder of La Voz de Tierra Caliente, was shot and killed at a car wash in Guerrero state.

Two other journalists were wounded last month in attacks believed to have been carried out in retaliation for their work.

Those incidents are a part of a recent rise of killings and other crime across Mexico. Chihuahua, the state where Breach was killed, has been especially hard hit. The 121 homicides there in January were nearly twice what the state saw the previous January.

In his final note to readers, Cantu complained about a culture of impunity in Mexico. There have been no arrests in the killing of Breach.

Cantu titled his article “Adios.”

NOTE TO READER:  HONEST, OPEN JOURNALISTS ARE BEING SHUT DOWN!  WHO DO YOU THINK IS LEFT.  THE AFRAID, PAID AND CORRUPTERS!

 
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
Here's another welcome by CJNG to Taxco;

I am the Devil's commander ’... Jalisco New Generation Cartel announces its arrival in Taxco, Guerrero:

Perfect, one of the best cities in Guerrero, silver city, great plaza, mountains and moon in the background. CJNG is coming to welcome visitors. The rooster fighter is very macho!.  Thanks for screwing up another great Mexican City, for what?



They wear their macho, letter jackets, murder in Guanajuato, Vera Cruz, doesn't matter, enough is never enough, not until I'm gone.  I'll take you with me.  This guy is nuts and will prove it if you go against him.  Valencias, Sinaloas armed wing, Rosalinda, Menchito (thanks for the letter), he is caustic, pure acid.  He'd love to have my ass, and maybe he will, but he is a slick impostor, wrecking the dreams of the wary traveller, landscape, etc.  To fight roosters and rule the cartels.  OK, why?  Do you not have a conscious, soul? or are you sold out to the devil?? devoid of any morality?

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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
This post was updated on .
Today and yesterday in Guerrero;

Man found executed west of Chilpancingo -

Man found executed and rotting in Jalapa, in the municipality of Eduardo Neri -

Armed civilians attack the "Mariscos Nacho" restaurant in the Centro neighborhood -

Two men are shot in the front of the Jardin Mangos neighborhood in Acapulco -

Source:  https://www.lorealdeguerrero.com/

Social activist Arnulfo Ceron Soriano was tortured and buried alive:  Tlachinollan;

GUERRERO.- For the director of the Human Rights Center of La Montaña-Tlachinollan, Abel Barrera Hernández, social activist Arnulfo Cerón Soriano, was tortured and buried alive in a clandestine grave on the outskirts of the city of Tlapa de Comonfort

He said that the autopsy performed on the body of the deceased showed that the cause of death was "suffocation by suffocation in the airways."

During a meeting with journalists this Thursday in this capital city, Barrera Hernández answered the question that if that result of the autopsy would mean that Arnulfo Cerón was buried alive, he replied: "We deduce that this happened."

The last day that Cerón Soriano was seen alive was on October 11 in the city of Tlapa. His body was found on November 20 in a clandestine grave at the point known as Los tres poles, El Aguaje neighborhood, on the outskirts of Tlapa, where the body was unearthed with the use of machinery (trascabo).

At the beginning of November he was arrested in the municipality of Ayala, state of Morelos, a man identified as Jorge “N”, alias “La Chiva”, who on the 8th of that same month was linked to the process by a Guerrero control judge, as likely responsible for the murder of Cerón Soriano.

The information that “La Chiva” would have provided to the Prosecutor's Office of Guerrero was essential so that on Wednesday of this week Marco Antonio García Morales, “chief of staff” in the Tlapa government, accused as “intellectual author” of the murder of Cerón Soriano. IRZA

Source:  https://novedadesaca.mx/el-activista-social-arnulfo-ceron-soriano-fue-torturado-y-enterrado-vivo-tlachinollan/

Finally, you only have one day to claim your tickets for the concert tomorrow night in Chilpancingo for El Fantasmas, Los Armadillos, the crazy clowns and bull riding events and much more.  Here is the promotion;  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5woR8iS_V0

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Re: Guerrero 2020

.
Tough town, Acapulco.  Would love to hear some recent tourist accounts of outside the resort walls.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Chava
That would be found on the Acapulco forum for Tripadvisor. No pasa nada will be the acclaim from the tourists.........until algo pasa
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Re: Guerrero 2020

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by Parro
Wow Government ordered it!
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Chava
In reply to this post by Parro
Right in the heart of the tourist district.

https://novedadesaca.mx/asesinan-a-taxista-sobre-la-costera/
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
Chava, where are there more taxi drivers executed than in Acapulco and outside the metro area?

One of the most dangerous jobs, driving passengers to their place of destination, all except the criminals have other intentions.  Piso.

The crime occurred at the height of the Condesa Fractionation.

42 year old Juan Carlos "N" was executed on Miguel Aleman coastal avenue, at the location of a well-known hotel, in the Condesa Fractionation area.

The events look place today, while he was waiting for customers.

The procedures of the cadaveric survey were carried out by the ministerial authorities of Costa Azul and after the proceedings, the body was lifted by the employees of the Medical Service and admitted to its facilities.



Another body sent to the morgue, posted "no vacancy".  Anyone making a dime, who doesn't pay their piso, suffers the consequences.  Acapulco, rotten to the core.  No one is off limits. Extortion to the nth degree.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
Feliz Navedad, all!

Something new in Guerrero news, a new source.  Interesting article, a new narrative?



An Amapola Periodismo meeting

RECENTLY, IN A DONATED OFFICE SPACE in downtown Chilpancingo, the capital of Mexico’s Guerrero State, members of the local journalists’ association settled in for a meeting. They’d come to discuss the upcoming lineup of Amapola Periodismo, a news site they’d founded five months before, to “dismantle the official narrative” of their home state. “We are sick of it,” Vania Pigeonutt, a reporter who helped establish the project, says—sick of Guerrero’s troubles being signified simply by “the presence of an illicit crop.”

Amapola means “poppy”—the opium poppy that’s been farmed in Guerrero for generations to supply the United States’ heroin market, bringing with it organized crime. The outlet’s name recasts what has become a trope of national and international reporting on Guerrero, with the slogan “Periodismo transgresor” (“transgressive journalism”). Margena de la O, another reporter on the project, says that Amapola is daring to tell stories about Guerrero that are upbeat. Daily reports are organized into unconventional sections—“Peace,” “Otherness,” “Nature,” and “The Mole”—referring to articles that expose dishonesty in government. A series called #SinLimites (“No Limits”) features stories about guerrerenses succeeding in education, sports, and the arts—such as seventeen-year-old Ximena Ortega, who will represent Mexico in the World Chess Championship in Romania for the second year in a row. “If we have a text that shows the latest violence in Guerrero, we also have immediately, the next day, a #SinLimites text showing a positive story,” de la O explains. In this way, “adversity is reconstructed.”

Amapola was developed in part as a response to the influx of foreign press when, on the night of September 26, 2014, forty-three students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers’ College in Iguala, just east of Chilpancingo, disappeared. The incident was shocking and the case mysterious—the bodies of the lost students remain missing—and the story quickly made Guerrero ground zero for reporting on human rights abuses, criminal activity, and impunity in Mexico. Starting that October, “suddenly the whole world was coming to Guerrero,” Pigeonutt recalls. “BBC, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Deutsche Welle…they were all interested in covering what had happened.”

Since then, Pigeonutt, de la O, and their Amapola colleagues have frequently found themselves on the road to Iguala alongside correspondents from foreign news outlets, with whom they work as fixers while reporting their own articles. In many ways, the international attention has been a good thing, Pigeonutt says, in that it kept the case open, and English-language media have broadcast findings that were not publicized in Mexico. Yet some visiting journalists have also demonstrated what is known among local reporters and activists as extractivismo (“extractivism”)—where “there is no reciprocity” from foreign reporters, she says. The offenders come only for a short while, have “no time to reflect on regional, national, and local dynamics,” and rely (without sufficient recognition) on the knowledge of a journalist working as a fixer. At its worst, says Pigeonutt, extractivismo is a kind of “vandalism”—a defacement and erasure of local stories. A number of pieces on Guerrero have offered only the most stereotypical representations of the state—and Mexico at large—as perpetually war-torn, beyond hope.

To launch Amapola, Pigeonutt and de la O joined with fellow members of the Asociación de Periodistas del Estado de Guerrero, the local journalists’ association, to “lead people to look at the real causes of the poverty, the femicides, the infanticides” that permeate life in Guerrero, de la O explains. Ten local media outlets signed on to collaborate, including the Alianza de Medios, an offshoot of Periodistas de a Pie, a civil society organization founded by the prominent Mexican journalist Marcela Turati. The Alianza is united by a belief, de la O says, that “there is no one better to explain what happens in a region of Mexico than journalists in the region.”

At their staff meeting, they ran through a planned lineup: a piece on street dogs and public health, forced displacement related to conflict between gangs on Guerrero’s state border with Michoacán, and a visit by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to the indigenous region of La Montaña. They discussed a desire to depict Guerrero in its particularity, even when it comes to bloodshed. “The violence in Guerrero is not the same, for example, as the violence in Juárez,” de la O says.


In telling a more nuanced truth about Guerrero, Amapola will tell readers, “We are not afraid,” she adds. “This is important in Guerrero and with everything that is going on in the country, because it can also be a window to start thinking about solutions.”

[those who only see the bright side, not the shadows and blood on the ground. Not afraid, and willing to talk about the reality, from feral dogs to cartels.  God bless them, may all their Christmases be white!]




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Re: Guerrero 2020

Chava
In reply to this post by Parro
Thanks for the translation Parro. For the record, this was in front of the Fiesta Americana. Many gringos stay there during Jan. Feb. and into March.

Many of them probably would know who this driver is.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
First of all, Happy New Year, Chava, Infohiker and others, etc.



More than a year after they were forced to abandon their communities due to cartel violence, displaced residents of the Guerrero municipality of Leonardo Bravo sought assistance from federal and state security forces on Sunday so that they could return home.

After becoming aware that the National Guard, the army and state police had launched an operation in response to violent incursions into El Carrizal and El Naranjo over the weekend, residents traveled to the latter community to ask personally that security forces remain in Leonardo Bravo to protect citizens and repel armed groups that operate in and around Filo de Caballos, a town notorious for violence and the cultivation of opium poppies.

Accompanied by representatives of the Morelos y Pavón Human Rights Center, the residents set up a blockade to try to prevent the security forces’ departure.
 
According to a report by the newspaper Milenio, the federal and state security personnel argued that they couldn’t stay because they didn’t have orders to do so from their superiors.

After several minutes of heated discussion, the security forces persuaded the residents to lift their blockade so that they could leave.

Human rights center director Manuel Olivares Hernández said human rights representatives and residents followed the security forces “because we also had to leave the area for security reasons.”

The residents issued a plea to the federal government for the National Guard to return to their towns and take over security duties from community police.

They described their situation as desperate, explaining that they fear further attacks on their towns by criminal groups. Residents said that the body of an unidentified male youth was found in El Naranjo after an attack on the town Saturday morning.

Several criminal groups operate in Leonardo Bravo and the surrounding region including Los Rojos and Los Ardillos, which have engaged in a bloody turf war in recent years.

The suspected leader of the former gang was arrested in the municipality in August after a three-day confrontation between Los Rojos and 700 community police.

Violence has caused thousands of people to flee their homes in Guerrero, one of Mexico’s most violent states.

Source: Milenio (sp)

THE TOWNSPEOPLE BLOCKADED THE ROAD, OUTSIDE THEIR COMMUNITY, ASKING NATIONAL GUARD, ETC. TO STAY AROUND.  THE PROTECTOR OF THE PEOPLE, LEFT DUE TO ORDERS FROM THEIR SUPERIORS, how sad does that get!!!
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Infohiker
Happy New Year!
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Infohiker
In reply to this post by .
You won't see much of reality on Trip Advisor.  There is a cadre of ostriches on that board who refuse to accept that anything bad happens.  To a certain extent this is true for them- there is a dichotomy between what a tourist sees (even outside the resort), and the daily life of a resident.   Tourists tend to travel in a bubble.  But the result is they tend to shout down or explain away what little is reported on the board.  

I just got back from 10 days down there.   City (as usual the weeks of Christmas/NYE) was busy, 99% Mexican nationals.   An excess of tourbuses.  A lot of out of state plates as well, including Sonora, Sinaloa, Jalisco, Quintana Roo.   Huge traffic snarls from Caleta to the Zocalo, as there were a number of tourist things going on in the area - markets, etc.   Restaurants of all stripes were packed at night.   I did see more gringos around than I have seen in a long time on the Costera.  Plane from CdMx was shockingly mainly gringos, though I suspect most went safely behind resort walls.  All of this was normal for this week - unless you have a long weekend the city is a quieter.   What little foreign tourism is still there will start in a few weeks and run through Easter.  But it isnt very visible.

Heard about various shootings through word of mouth, etc, but saw nothing.  There was a decent military presence, but nothing more than usual, despite the reports there was increased presence.  I don't have any good insight into the taxi murder beyond the taxi driver liked his drugs (and that is just a rumor), I do know that there were a few more incidents along the costera, that got cleaned up quick.  
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Parro
Buenos tardes info hiker.

In Mexico now, not in Guerrero.  Miss it, especially the people.  Hope to make it down there soon.

I don't like traveling in the bubble, because I think I know what's outside it.  There is safety outside the bubble, but you have to have local advice and company. TripAdvisor is clueless.  We'll see where I end up, but I hope it's close by.

Best wishes for the New Year!  Here we go again.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

.
In reply to this post by Infohiker
Thanks infohiker.  Appreciate the story, insightful to the current situation unlike the tripadvisor suggestion. I ask myself if the tourists that visit these war zones are just unaware, unafraid, or just plain indifferent.  Probably all three to varying degrees.  Nice to know however that some of the law-abiding locals can still rely on incoming tourist dollars to some extent, which hopefully will not all be piso'ed away by criminals.  Welcome back.
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Re: Guerrero 2020

Chava
In reply to this post by Infohiker
My comment about Tripadvisor was tongue in cheek. I agree with your assessment infohiker.
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