Guanajuato

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Guanajuato

Parro
Nabble, Part 1, please help me here:

Celaya,  need I say more, will let the student protesters speak for me.  Epicenter of Marro/Mencho.  Much harder path than Mencho thought.  Marro is hard country.  Guanajuato, is crazy violent, because of petrol, money & power.  



Eleven criminal groups operate in Guanajuato, four of which have links to official security forces or government, according to a new study about crime in the state.

Presented in Irapuato on Monday by a former National Public Security System chief, the study by consultancy firm Lantia Consultores said two criminal groups with a national presence operate in the state along with four “regional mafias” and five fuel theft gangs.

Juan Manuel Alcántara Soria said the number of criminal groups in Guanajuato has increased from six to 11 in the past two years and that a turf war between two of them – the Jalisco New Generation Cartel and the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel – is largely responsible for the high number of homicides that has made the state the most violent in Mexico since October 2017.

Criminal groups have links to authorities in at least seven municipalities, the study said.

In León, Pénjamo, Irapuato, Salamanca and Jerécuaro there is evidence of links between criminal groups and municipal police or the local council.

In Valle de Santiago, evidence points to collusion between organized crime and municipal police or the council as well as state police.

In Villagrán, there are signs of complicity between organized crime and municipal police or the council as well as with federal security forces.

Links have been identified between the suspected leader of the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel, José Antonio “El Marro” Yépez Ortiz, and Villagrán Mayor Juan Lara Mendoza, the study said.

Lara has previously rejected allegations that he is in cahoots with the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel and denies knowing “El Marro.”

Low police salaries, insufficient training and poor quality or non-existent equipment are among the reasons why criminal groups have been able to establish connections with or infiltrate security forces, the study said.

It also said there is a link between the infiltration of authorities by organized crime and the high number of police deaths.
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Re: Guanajuato

Parro
Here we go, Part 2, (can someone show me the way forward without parts??);



Thirty-nine police have been murdered in Guanajuato this year, more than any other state.

Michoacán, where 14 state police officers were killed in a cartel ambush on Monday, has recorded the second highest number of police deaths with 37.

The study said there were 1,878 homicides perpetrated by criminal groups in Guanajuato in the first seven months of 2019, a 7% increase compared to the same period last year.

Alcántara said that León, Salamanca and Irapuato were the most violent municipalities in the first seven months of the year, recording 252, 249 and 243 homicides respectively.

He said homicides spiked after President López Obrador took office last December and when petroleum pipelines were closed in January as part of the government’s crackdown on fuel theft.

The closure of the pipelines, Alcántara said, prompted criminal groups to turn to extortion, kidnapping and other forms of robbery.

He claimed that state and municipal authorities have failed to respond adequately to the violence generated by organized crime groups and have manipulated crime statistics to support their denial of the extent of the problem.

The former security official said that a security strategy for Guanajuato must be based on crime prevention at the municipal level and charged that the deployment of the navy or National Guard won’t be effective unless authorities of all three levels of government share information and work together to combat violence.

Source: Periódico Correo (sp), Zona Franca (sp)
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Re: Guanajuato

Parro
Guanajuato. the most violent state.
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Re: Guanajuato

Freebird
Seems to me it's bc the easy fuel money is gone ...so instead of stealing from the country, they have to start stealing from their neighbors
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Re: Guanajuato

Parro
This post was updated on .
Freebird, fuel money is not gone, it's about the same as far as market share. Pemex and Mexico still coming up with major shortages.  Another failed AMLO initiative.  It's fueled (no pun intended) the Santa Lima Rosa Cartel and El Marro.

Sinaloa looks like his crew has a good joint venturer.  Looks who come's along at the end of the parade;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3253fMBkfcg

Hugs, not bullets, won't work for generations.  Poverty and corruption is so deep rooted in Mexican society.  Meanwhile, the government has to show they are effective at some point of controlling anarchy, or so it will be become.  Kind've like "I, Robot". Socialism has never worked anywhere in the world that I know of.

Source on video.
Kab
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Re: Guanajuato

Kab
Would you look at that.

My city of birth, Valle de Santiago, Guanajuato.

Piece of shit town and country like I have been saying, that's why I don't dare go there.
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Re: Guanajuato

Parro
You and others I know,  Small farmers and families.  Extorted for their small farms and produce.

Many will not go back.  They are caught between the crosshairs when they do.



government’s war against oil theft, it has used its remaining clout in the state of Guanajuato to fall back on another successful criminal economy: intimidation and extortion.  

The cartel’s move into extortion first caught headlines in September when eight of its members were arrested for extorting tortilla and taco restaurants in Celaya, Guanajuato, reported Televisa. Authorities also allegedly discovered the gang’s main operation center, seizing money, computers, weapons and vehicles, as well as records of the businesses they had been extorting. The findings showed that the gang was also active in extortion in other cities in the state, including Salamanca and Villagran.

Carlos Zamarripa, the Attorney General of Guanajuato, told the press that “our analysts are now processing documents and spreadsheets with lists of victims and shops.”

These arrests came after a series of attacks on tortilla bakeries and restaurants in Guanajuato, stretching back to August. According to owners of tortilla shops in the city, the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel ask for one-time payments of between 30,000 and 500,000 pesos ($1,500-$26,000) as well as monthly payments of 3,000-5,000 pesos ($150-260), reported El Sol del Bajio.

A series of attacks in Celaya in August appeared linked to these extortion tactics. Armed attacks at two establishments resulted in the death of four people and left one person wounded, reported Milenio. At the Indita restaurant at Lake Zirahuén, gunmen opened fire, killing three women who were working at the establishment. The fourth victim was a customer at a construction materials shop on the Panamerican highway. Another attack at the Perlita tortilleria ended up causing damage to property, but no casualties were reported.

This led to a widespread strike among tortilla shops in Celaya, with many of them shutting down to protest the violence against them.

Guanajuato, one of Mexico’s industrial heartlands, has seen extortion of restaurants, butcher shops, and other businesses skyrocket of late. But homicide rates have also doubled since 2017, largely as a consequence of the war between the Jalisco Cartel and CSRL, and the government’s muscular intervention as a result. While the state saw 1,084 homicides in 2017, that number had already reached 2,000 by September 2019, reported Animal Politico.

Despite promising not to go after the cartels, Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador has made it a priority to bring the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel down, due to their dependence on oil theft. By July 2019, authorities had reportedly arrested or killed 62 suspected cartel collaborators in Guanajuato. But the cartel was formed and rose to power inside this state, making it no surprise that it has since pivoted to other criminal economies such as extortion.

Born out of a coalition of local gangs to fight the encroaching Jalisco Cartel New Generation (Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación – CJNG), the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel has deep roots in much of Guanajuato. Despite being relatively unknown at the time, it allegedly warned the president in January to remove security forces fighting oil theft in the area or people would die. The note that was left near the Pemex refinery in Salamanca and was seemingly signed by José Antonio Yépez Ortiz, alias “El Marro,” the leader of the cartel. Despite the crackdown, El Marro remains at large.

In March 2019, state and federal armed forces launched operation Golpe de Timón against Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel. However, villages torched vehicles, blocked roads, and impeded the execution of search warrants.

Nevertheless, Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel’s strength is localized, and is not believed to have diverse revenue streams. While the government has targeted its oil theft operations, extortion has provided a relatively easy alternative.