Fentanyl

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Re: Fentanyl

canadiana
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That is educational Parro.I didn't know any of that.I assumed it was just a waste of a high like a guy that snorts coke all night and drinks beer after beer countering the effects of his cocaine high (yes you can drink and drink like there's no tomorrow because you're mixing a stimulant like coke with a depressant like alcohol,maybe drink coffee?)and complains that the coke is lousy as he has to keep snorting more than usual.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Pardon me BB followers, but Nabble, hence Part 1;



Julio Moreno is 31. He’s been using drugs since the age of 12. Living in the Mexican border city of Mexicali, he’s seen it all: heroin, cocaine, crack, meth, marijuana. But in September this year, Moreno tried something for the first time: fentanyl.

“It really knocked me out, but it’s better than heroin,” he told OZY on a recent Sunday morning at the local outreach center, Verter, where he goes to exchange his old syringes for new ones. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid at least 50 times stronger than heroin and gives users a stronger high. The biggest cause of drug overdoses in the United States in 2019, fentanyl has now crossed the border into Mexico, where those who work with drug users are seeing overdoses spike.

Official figures in Mexico reported only six fentanyl overdoses in 2015. In 2017, they reported 37 — but that’s likely the tip of the iceberg. This week, Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) announced that addiction is now a major focus for his administration due to the scale of the problem



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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 2:



“This is all you’re going to be hearing and seeing on the radio and on television and in the newspapers — only this for a while. And going forward … we are going to dedicate a day a week showing advances in our plan: why fentanyl is spreading, its effects, everything,” he said.

Ricardo Mejía Berdeja, Mexico’s deputy director of public security, said that growing consumption of the synthetic opioid is a new problem: “It’s mostly invading the North American market, but now it’s damaging our country too.”
         
A poster for the Mexico government’s current anti-drug use campaign reads: “Fentanyl kills – sometimes the first time you try it.”

SOURCE GOVERNMENT OF MEXICO

An OZY investigation reveals that fentanyl is part of a two-pronged crisis that’s turning the country — traditionally known more as a route for drugs meant for the U.S. — into a bigger domestic market for narcotics than ever before. With American authorities under the Trump administration tightening border security and cracking down on the production of illicit drugs in their territory, Mexican cartels are increasingly flooding their homeland instead with fentanyl and methamphetamine, another synthetic drug.

“We’re going to get to the root of this, getting rid of the cancer of addiction, as a way of taking resources out of criminal organizations that get money and power from the local [drug] market,” said Mejía.

The number of Mexicans who reported having used drugs once in their lives nearly doubled between 2011 and 2016, from just over 5 percent to roughly 10 percent, according to a government survey. That explosion in drug use coincides with the highest homicide rates the country has seen in modern history, with an average of 90 murders every day.

The Mexican state is struggling to cope with the expansion in drug consumption and doesn’t have the infrastructure to provide the care that people need, its officials concede. That’s placing NGOs like Verter on the front lines of the battle to contain this growing epidemic.

OVERDOSES START TO SPIKE AT THE BORDER

A two-hour drive west from Verter in Mexicali, the local needle-exchange program Prevencasa confronts the same reality in the border town of Tijuana. Some 18 months ago, they started to see a new trend: a spike in overdoses that coincided with the arrival of a white powder “heroin” known as China White. But this isn’t the infamous China White — pure heroin from Southeast Asia — of the 1980s. It’s just another name for synthetic, black-market fentanyl, and Prevencasa has the tests to prove it.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 3:



“Fentanyl is now the majority of the ‘heroin’ consumed in Tijuana, based on what we’re seeing in Prevencasa,” says Joseph Friedman, an MD/Ph.D. student from the University of California, Los Angeles, who is doing research with the outreach program on heroin use in Tijuana.

“It’s faster-acting and has led to a big spike in overdoses, which are fatal if you don’t treat them,” Friedman notes. “There is a subjective difference that a lot of people report between what you experience with a black tar heroin as opposed to China White/fentanyl — a stronger initial come-on that goes down faster and provokes other weird sensations. Something is different.”

The United States is deporting some of its opioid crisis south of the border, says Friedman.

Friedman notes, “The U.S. opioid epidemic is a massive wave of suffering, and some percent of that wave is deportable — and the deported fraction ends up here and then what happens to them? A big fraction of the population became addicted in California and then got deported.”

Meanwhile, to push meth — known locally as cristal  — in the border cities, drug sellers have in recent years offered a bonus dose free with heroin, says 41-year-old Lourdes Angulo, who co-founded Verter in Mexicali. “That was to get them hooked, and that’s how the use of cristal started to increase here.”

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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 4:



The scale of the crisis is visible to Dr. Clara Fleiz at Mexico’s National Institute of Psychiatry, who has been working with organizations such as Prevencasa and Verter to study causes for the rise in overdoses. A survey conducted by her team in the border cities of Tijuana, Mexicali, San Luis Río Colorado and Ciudad Juárez shows that overdoses from fentanyl are going “higher and higher every day,” she says. “Now, 25 percent [of drug users] have had one in the last year.”

That’s only going to get worse. As the U.S. doubles down on border security, getting drugs across the international line is getting harder and more complicated for criminal organizations. Seizures of fentanyl by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) more than doubled between 2017 and 2018, from 181 to 388 pounds. Meth seizures by the CBP increased from 4,000 pounds in 2014 to 13,400 pounds already this year. In turn, homegrown markets are becoming more of a focus for crime groups, and the protection of local street sales is emerging as a parallel reason for homicides in Mexico.

“Sadly, we are prey to what the United States does,” says Jaime Arredondo, who researches drug and security policy in both the U.S. and Mexico.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 5:

A 50-PESO DOSE TO GET THROUGH THE NIGHT

In the city of Irapuato, in the central state of Guanajuato, Luciano Salazar, 35, squints as he looks at his phone. He points to dozens of local users of the Grindr dating app who have put a diamond symbol in their profiles. “That shows that they either want to buy or sell cristal,” he explains. One baggie of meth costs just 50 pesos ($2.50).

Salazar is gay. He estimates that most of those he comes across in the gay community in the city of 600,000 people use cristal — including in ChemSex parties popular in the male gay population. He himself was an addict for two years. “I weighed 83 kilos when I started using cristal — by the end of my addiction, I weighed 53,” he says.



Cristal is today the most popular drug in Guanajuato, says Raul Espinosa, who works at Irapuato Vive, a nonprofit that assists drug users. Demand for treatment for meth use has grown more than seven-fold in the state, from fewer than 200 in 2013 to nearly 1,400 people seeking help in government clinics in 2018, according to official figures. More than two-thirds of addicts at the state’s treatment centers, known by their acronym CIJ in Spanish, are looking for treatment for meth use, and the CIJ is overwhelmed.

Irapuato Vive lies along an industrial corridor that runs through the state and also includes the cities of Celaya, Silao, Salamanca and Leon. Observers say that the long shifts people need to work at car assembly lines and factories or while trucking long distances also encourage meth use — it helps them keep feeling alert and keeps fatigue at bay. The car industry in Guanajuato — including factories for General Motors, Pirelli, Volkswagen and Ford — accounts for 18 percent of the state economy, according to Sophia Huett, Guanajuato’s chief of public security. “One 50-peso dose gets [truck drivers] through the night or all the way to Monterrey,” says Espinosa.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 6 (and leaving out many fotos):



That pattern is also evident in Tijuana, which is littered with factories known as maquilas that produce everything from cars and electronic home appliances to laptops and mobile phones. “I could concentrate more and think faster when I first started using cristal at work,” says German Navarro, 49, a recovering addict in Tijuana. When he was using meth a few years ago, he worked as a dispatcher in the border city, organizing drivers who would truck goods into the U.S. A strong stimulant, meth improved his performance on the job and allowed him to stay alert and awake for longer.

But the rise in meth use isn’t isolated to a few cities. Multiple Mexican states have seen a sharp increase in its use. Demand in five states — Guanajuato, Jalisco, Michoacán, Sonora and Sinaloa — more than doubled between 2008 and 2016, according to government figures. Colima saw an eight-fold increase in people reporting use over this period. And most experts interviewed by OZY think government surveys underestimate the scale of the problem.

HOMICIDE RATES SPIRAL NEAR TOURIST HOT SPOTS

Meth addiction is more than just a medical issue. The rising levels of meth use also correlate with more homicides. The state of Guanajuato is home to the popular tourist destinations of San Miguel de Allende and the city of Guanajuato, and had never been a homicide hot spot before 2017. But for the past two years, it has witnessed the highest rate of killings in the country. There were 2,609 in 2018, according to the Public System for National Security, and the homicide rate was 57 per 100,000 compared to a national average of 29. This year is on track to be just as bad — 1,790 murders in the first eight months.

“The murder rates that we’re seeing are scandalous,” the state’s prosecutor Carlos Zamarripa Aguirre tells OZY.

Guanajuato isn’t alone. Where meth use has grown most noticeably, homicides are at brutal levels. Colima’s homicide rate currently stands at 103 per 100,000 — in 2015, it was 19.2. In the southern state of Michoacán, homicide rates have doubled in recent years, from just over 25 per 100,000 in 2015 to nearly 55 this year.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Part 8??, omg!;

Over the last decade, territorial disputes between cartels over routes into America were the motive for such killings.

“Slum and urban violence amongst youths tend to be related to retail sales, whereas violence out in the mountains are more high-level hits by the cartels, major confrontations between organizations and disputes over export routes,” says Jaime Lopez, a former Mexican law enforcement official who is now a security analyst.

Photos provided by Zamarripa’s office show packets of meth and marijuana clearly marked with branding of the New Generation Jalisco Cartel (CJNG), one of the country’s most notorious crime syndicates along with the Sinaloa cartel that Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán used to share control of. In August last year, the Mexican military recovered 50 tons of meth in a mountain lab in Sinaloa. Mexican authorities have also seized fentanyl in states such as Michoacán, Jalisco and Sinaloa, and in the last 12 months have found four clandestine laboratories around the country.

Espinosa and drug users at the Irapuato Vive center say that many homicides involve low-level dealers and addicts who are punished by their dealers for buying meth from rival suppliers.

“The biggest challenge to public security is drug consumption,” says Huett. But neither her state government nor the federal administration appears prepared to tackle the crisis.

A CRISIS OF AMERICA’S MAKING

Gady Zabicky knows that he has a problem on his hands. The new head of Mexico’s addiction treatment agency — known by its acronym CONADIC — is worried not only by the growing use of meth and fentanyl, but also by the falling age of users and the growing number of women getting hooked, according to recent government surveys. “This is a red flag,” says Zabicky.

In many ways, the arrival of fentanyl use in Mexico is of America’s making and a consequence of the opioid crisis currently rocking the U.S., where for years unfettered pharmaceutical companies marketed highly addictive opioid painkillers to medical professionals and patients. Patients got addicted, and when their insurance or prescriptions ran out, they turned to street-market Mexican heroin to feed their habits. Some of that heroin contained fentanyl to make it stronger, although drug users weren’t necessarily aware of that because these were illegal drugs.

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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Promise, this is the last, Part 9, whew, i need some coffee;

Once addicts discovered they were taking fentanyl and that it was a stronger opioid than heroin, some of them left heroin behind altogether. The fentanyl industry that grew out of that demand — the drug goes into the U.S. direct from China in the postal system as well as via the border produced by Mexican cartels — has found a new market.

“Because of our insatiable demand for all kinds of drugs, other countries such as Mexico supply them,” says Vigil, the former DEA agent. “And they also supply users in their own country. Source countries eventually create addiction, drug overdose deaths and devastated communities. Mexico is no exception.”

But whatever the origins of the crisis, Zabicky admits that the current Mexican administration simply doesn’t have the network to cope. There are state clinics across the country that mostly provide free treatment; 104 CIJ centers and another program known as CAPA, which has some 341 units around the country. They’re not enough, and those drug users left out depend upon thousands of private drug treatment centers, the majority of which aren’t regulated.

A minority of them can provide the tools people need to get off drugs, but others known as annexos are notorious for imprisoning addicts and abusing their human rights with the aim of curing their habits — which is illegal but tolerated. Zabicky says that there are some 2,200 around the country, but there are likely many more. In the city of Irapuato alone, users say there are more than 50 private clinics. “The majority of them don’t comply with government norms,” admits Zabicky, but the government can’t close them down because there isn’t enough state help to go around. “The system would collapse.”

Instead, Zabicky plans to bring all the private drug clinics operating around Mexico onto the government’s radar in order to better train their staff and establish basic norms. But his approach contrasts with that of the government he serves.

Although observers welcome President AMLO’s renewed focus on addiction, many worry about the tone and approach. The government’s current anti-drug-use campaigns warn users that fentanyl kills — even the first time it’s used.

“I think these kinds of campaigns produce more fear instead of educating people about substance use, which generates negative consequences. These scare tactics don’t contribute to a more elevated conversation about drug policy,” says Arredondo, the drugs policy researcher.

And despite AMLO’s publicized push against addiction, federal government money to private organizations such as Prevencasa and Verter in the border cities of Tijuana and Mexicali was cut off at the beginning of the year when he entered office. The cuts were part of the president’s fight against corruption.

Fleiz at Mexico’s National Institute of Psychiatry says that while it’s important to filter out corrupt organizations, all groups shouldn’t be painted with the same brush. “I’m in complete disagreement with these budget cuts,” she says. “The people that have been really hard hit are drug users, as there are less resources to help them.”

NEW SOLUTIONS FOR OLD PROBLEMS?

Apart from its media campaign, part of the government’s efforts to address addiction are legislative. A bill for decriminalizing marijuana use and cultivation is currently being debated in the country’s senate. It’s not clear if and when the bill will pass, and there are doubts as to how effective it could be.

On the border, activists are taking a more vanguard approach than AMLO. Nancy Sanchez, 43, visited the Verter center in Mexicali early on a recent Sunday afternoon to exchange her dirty needles for clean ones. She then went into the back room and tied a blue tourniquet around her tiny arm before shooting up heroin, as Angulo watched her. This tiny space is the first of its kind in the entire region — embracing the principle of harm reduction for drug users, rather than criminalization.



Angulo and her colleagues are trying to get vulnerable women like Sanchez to slowly embrace other services they offer such as HIV tests, counseling services and health education. “We have had to adapt. Here, women can stay as long as they want or need — and our adviser has to be with them here all the time,” says Angulo.

Such an approach could be a welcome change in Latin America, where laws and policies generally stigmatize users of hard drugs like Sanchez and Moreno. When the Verter safe room opened in September last year, it caused a scandal — betraying the conservatism of large slices of Mexican society. A national newspaper called it a legal picadero — slang for places where addicts consume drugs — and an embarrassed local government shut it down. After a dogged bureaucratic effort by Angulo and her co-founder, the room is operating in a bureaucratic gray zone, registered as a business when it’s a nonprofit. “It’s better to ask for forgiveness than permission,” says Angulo, shrugging. She doesn’t know how much longer the room will remain open.

For users like Moreno, the government’s focus on addiction is too little, too late, but it is early days for other users. In the United States, the government failed to realize what was happening until the situation was critical. Mexico’s authorities won’t be able to use that excuse if fentanyl addiction here reaches the same levels.

Source:  https://www.ozy.com/fast-forward/ozy-investigation-americas-fentanyl-crisis-heads-south-to-mexico/227967/

MY TAKE:  FENTANYL IS BAD.  THINK BLACK TAR, THEN CHINA WHITE.  THIS IS FAR WORSE.  ALL THE PICTURES IN THIS POST ARE REPEATED EVERYDAY IN EVERY MAJOR CITY OF USA.  A PRODUCT OF THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM, MEXICAN WORK ETHIC, IS DESTROYING SOCIETY, ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE ON THE FRINGE.  JUST SAYING, BEWARE!
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Re: Fentanyl

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by Parro
Wow what a good article Parro!We always read about north of the border but little is written (at least this particular subject addiction in Mexico)about south of the border.I always knew there were addicts around border towns (never felt particularly safe among the riffraft and shady people among TJ and Mexicali) but didn't really know about places so far from the border like Leon,Celaya,etc. among the auto factory workers.Also like the article says and I never thought about that before was addicts that are deported don't magically stop drugs,there would be a demand there and many of those smugglers get paid in drugs so they offload on the local populace.Many communities north of the border are having crisis's due to fentanyl  but no way Mexico will have the resources to deal with this.How petty that many of the murders are due to buying drugs from rivals.Addicts don't care who they buy from when they need it they need it and why kill your prospective customer?(no free enterprise in the drug world in Mexico I guess).That just goes to show that murders aren't being dealt with in Mexico and is only going to get worse as the addiction crisis spreads in Mexico.I just finished reading an article on brain damage due to a fentanyl overdose that doesn't kill a person at the link below:
http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/alive-but-not-the-same-bc-woman-survives-overdose-but-left-with-brain-damage/ar-AAJJluG?li=AAggNb9&ocid=iehp
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Re: Fentanyl

blanco puro
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Parro
I'm a bit confused with the few posts I've seen where people say fent is mixed with other drugs or used to cut other drugs because fent is cheap. What are you guys talking about??
Does anyone in here sell drugs or do drugs to know what's out there on the street and what the prices are??

No one purposely cuts other drugs with fent. FENT is one of the most expensive drugs here in Canada, the only drug that probably cost more is CARFENT. The prices of heroin have plummeted because of the introduction of fent and carfent. From 80k per kilo it dropped to 50k this past summer, because no one wants it. They want fent, and which kind, the PURPLE, which btw is a mix of fent and heroin (with color added) , so in this case heroin is being used as a cut because IT is cheaper.

Cocaine is not cut with fent, not ever! (it is cut with "comeback" or phenacetin which only cost $500 per kg) and I can't think why you would cut any other drug with fent, and NO it's not because you want to get someone addicted. Because if their body is not used to opiates and they take fent by mistake, they DIE, you don't get repeat business. If you are not a regular opiate user even one Percocet will have you puking, so imagine an OXY which is 10 times as strong as a perc, imagine a point of heroin which is way stronger than an oxy, and now imagine fent which is stronger than heroin. You just DIE, and that doesn't make money. Coke customers complain when their shit burns their nose, wtf do you think they will do if they hear someone died? In regards to the comment someone posted about Fent and Crystal Meth, that's not something dealers do, that's users who make their own cocktails, and yes it's a new version of the old speedball. Meth being an upper like coke, and fent being the new down like heroin. I repeat this is done by USERS not cartels, not distributors, not even dealers. Fuck there's guys who sniff glue and spray lysol on bread and eat it, people do weird shit, what can i say?

The only time dealers like when people die off thier batch is when they are selling to junkies, who are purposely buying opiates. NOT other drugs. When the word hits the street that "Billy" died off that heroin or fent, everyone is rushing to find out who sold it because they want THAT high, they feel THEY can handle it, they won't die... because anyone who does opiates develops a tolerance quickly so you are always chasing the high.

And yes, alot of it comes from China. It seems as if it is manufactures in Mex, but it's not. That's just where it is shipped, because it's easier to land a package or load in Mex than it is in the States. When it reaches Mex, the fent is cut, and then shipped northbound. One kilo of fent makes 6 easy which still sell for $70,000 each. One kilo of carfentanyl turns into 25 kilos easily, which also sell for a similar price. When you hear of fent factories in Mex, they are just reprocessing labs where they cut it and repackage it.

And can we blame China for pumping this shit out?? Not really. Does everyone forget how many years England sent Opium to China and fuckt up their country, and even engaged in wars so that the trade could continue? Well the descendants of England are now in Canada and the US and it's payback.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
muy gracias blanco puro.

fent is being manufactured in Mexico.

that's why poppy gum is plummeting in price.  It's too labor intensive.

Cocaine is cut minutely with fent, to want more coke to get there, but fent holds you down, so I disagree here, kindly, think speedball.

Fent is not cut in Mexico, precursors now arrive from Chino. And fent is hecho in Mexico.  

The opium wars - well it was Chinese immigrants to Mexico that gave us poppy plants.  It's not payback, it's history.  Prices?  vary in demand and supply.  Fent rules, think tar and China White. They don't hold up and cost more to the user.  Fent rules, that's the problem.  Price and power.

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Re: Fentanyl

blanco puro
This post was updated on .
Parro  - I did say "alot (not all) of it comes from China" and I didn't mean to imply that no fent is manufactured in Mex at all, but I do still state that it is reprocessed in Mex, because it is cut in Mex, and it is also turned into other fent products such as pills. So if in that sense you say a fent pill is manufactured in Mex, then yes ok. When they speak of precursors coming into Mex, they are talking about Fent in a different form, not sure if that makes sense or if i am explaining it correctly. Imagine, you would not import 10 kilos of opium to produce 1 kilo of heroin, you would just import 10 kilos of heroin. Fent comes cheap enough from China that if you have a door in Mex, you might as well just bring it in ready made, leaving only secondary local processing (pills, cutting). Black Tar has always been low grade heroin, and china white was made obsolete many years before fent because the golden triangle produces ALOT less heroin than afghanistan. So being able to supply alot more for alot less, put china white on the back burner, it had nothing to do with fent. Let me give you some #s. China white heroin in Canada would sell for $80,000 a brick in BC, and AFG would sell for $70,000 per kilo in Ontario. Well here's the problem, not only is it $10,000 cheaper, the one in BC called a "brick" is not a kilo. Their standard brick (from the golden triangle) is 700g, while the kilo (from afg) in Ontario is a kilo. Sounds silly, you might say no cant be, but it is.. China white has been getting crushed for 10 yrs already, and now fent has surpassed heroin in popularity.

https://www.insightcrime.org/news/brief/china-fentanyl-ban-yet-to-hamper-mexico-crime-groups/

check out that article, we know who the big players are in Mex, why would they bring in such a huge load of fent if they can just produce it locally? It's not a matter of inability.

And you might have misunderstood, I didnt mean that China is getting payback to Mex, it is getting payback to the US/Canada, although sometimes it is through Mex. Alot of fent arrives here in Canada direct, and we also ship to the US. We don't get our opiates from the States (not saying that none of what's in the states ends up here, some does), we send it there, the prices are cheaper in Canada because it lands here also. Alot of drugs are cheaper in Canada than the US. Coke is $40k CAD per kilo in Toronto and in the South Eastern states, it is $35k USD. The same pound of marijuana which costs $800-1200 CAD in Toronto sells for $2000/lb USD in NY. China though plays a big role in undermining the western economy in MANY different ways, not just drugs, industrial espionage, counterfeit goods, etc.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/42-kgs-carfentanyl-found-1.4356938

At the same time (as the article above) in Mexico, fent had just started getting popular with the cartels, but it had been in Canada for a while, though the police had not come across it at that point. At the time of this bust they originally only charged the person for the guns, all the carfent was an unidentified substance til a few weeks later. They did not even have precautions in place to prevent fent/carfent exposure.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
This post was updated on .
Blanco Puro -

Good discussion.  But want to go back to CARFENT.  That's some serious stuff.  Stronger than Fent and many times more than smack.

From Wikipedia;

Carfentanil or carfentanyl is a structural analog of the synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl.[1] Short acting and with fast onset, it has, weight for weight, around one hundred times stronger effects than fentanyl and thousands of times stronger than heroin. It is more effective at reducing pain response in rats than any other opioid.[citation needed]

Carfentanil was first synthesized in 1974 by a team of chemists at Janssen Pharmaceutica which included Paul Janssen.[2]

The effects of carfentanil, including overdose, can be reversed by naloxone.[3]

Carfentanil is legally controlled in most jurisdictions, but has veterinary uses for anaesthetising large animals.


Typical use[edit]

Carfentanil was sold starting in 1986 under the brand name "Wildnil" for use in tranquilizer darts in combination with an α2-adrenoreceptor agonist[4] for large mammals including elk and elephants.[2][5] It was chosen for its high therapeutic index. Commercial production of Wildnil ceased in 2003, and the drug is available only as a compounded dosage form.[6]

See also: Gray death

2 milligrams of fentanyl, a lethal dose for most people.[8] The lethal dose of carfentanil is uncertain,[9] but is predicted to be much smaller.[10]

A November 2016 article in Time, "Heroin Is Being Laced With a Terrifying New Substance: What to Know About Carfentanil", reports over 300 cases of overdose related to fentanyl and fentanyl analogues and several deaths connected to the drug since August 2016 in several of the United States, including Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, Kentucky and Florida.[11] In 2017, a Milwaukee, Wisconsin man died from a carfentanil overdose, likely taken unknowingly with another illegal drug such as heroin or cocaine.[12] Carfentanil is most often taken with heroin or by users who believe they are taking heroin. Carfentanil is added to or sold as heroin because it is less expensive, easier to obtain and easier to make than heroin.[13] Health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential escalation of public health consequences of its recreational use.[14]

Importation from China[edit]

According to an Associated Press article from 2016, "Chemical weapon for sale: China's unregulated narcotic", fentanyl, carfentanil and other highly potent derivatives of fentanyl are actively marketed by several Chinese chemical companies.[13] Carfentanil was not a controlled substance in China until 1 March 2017,[15] and until then was manufactured legally and sold openly over the Internet.

Authorities in Latvia and Lithuania reported seizing carfentanil as an illicit drug in the early 2000s.[13][16] Around 2016, the US and Canada started reporting a dramatic increase in shipment of carfentanil and other strong opioid drugs to customers in North America from Chinese chemical supply firms. In June 2016 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police seized one kilogram of carfentanil shipped from China in a box labeled "printer accessories". According to the Canada Border Services Agency, the shipment contained 50 million lethal doses of the drug, more than enough to wipe out the entire population of the country, in containers labeled as toner cartridges for Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers. Allan Lai, an officer-in-charge at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Calgary who helped oversee the criminal investigation said, "With respect to carfentanil, we don't know why a substance of that potency is coming into our country."[13]

Main article: Moscow theater hostage crisis

In 2012, a team of researchers at the British chemical and biological defence laboratories at Porton Down found carfentanil and remifentanil in clothing from two British survivors of the 2002 Moscow theater hostage crisis and in the urine from a third survivor. The team concluded that the Russian military used an aerosol mist of carfentanil and remifentanil to subdue Chechen hostage takers.[17]

Authors of a previous paper in the Annals of Emergency Medicine surmised from the available evidence that the Moscow emergency services had not been informed of the use of the agent, but were instructed to bring opioid antagonists. Not knowing to expect hundreds of patients exposed to high doses of strong opioids, the emergency workers did not bring enough naloxone or naltrexone (the two most commonly-used opioid antagonists) to counteract the carfentanil and remifentanil and save the lives of many of the victims. 125 people exposed to the gas used in the rescue attempt are confirmed to have died from both respiratory failure and aerosol inhalation during the incident. The authors state that, assuming carfentanil and remifentanil were the only active ingredients of the knockout gas, the worst danger to the theater victims would have been apnea (loss of breathing), and that mechanical ventilation and/or treatment with opioid antagonists could have saved many lives.[18]

Potential as a chemical weapon[edit]

The toxicity of carfentanil in humans and its ready commercial availability has aroused concerns over its potential use as a weapon of mass destruction by rogue nations and terrorist groups.[13]

The toxicity of carfentanil has been compared to that of nerve gas, according to the Associated Press' article "Chemical weapon for sale: China's unregulated narcotic". The article quoted Andrew C. Weber, Assistant US Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Defense Programs from 2009 to 2014, as saying "It's a weapon. Companies shouldn't be just sending it to anybody." Weber added "Countries that we are concerned about were interested in using it for offensive purposes... We are also concerned that groups like ISIS could order it commercially." Weber described various ways carfentanil could be used as a weapon, such as knocking troops out and taking them hostage or killing civilians in enclosed spaces such as railway stations.[13]

Pharmacology[edit]

Carfentanil is a lipophilic chemical, and hence can much more easily cross the blood-brain barrier.[19]:pg 9 It thus has very rapid onset of effects, but is also shorter acting.

For pain relief, a unit of carfentanil is 100 times as potent as the same amount of fentanyl, 5,000 times as potent as a unit of heroin and 10,000 times as potent as a unit of morphine. This is despite only having 14-135 times higher affinity for the μ receptor.[4][20]

AND WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE CHECHANS.  POSSIBLY NOT.  THE POWER OF AN AEROSOL MIST.  SICK
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Re: Fentanyl

blanco puro
Parro - yup, Carfent is crazyyy!

"Carfentanil is most often taken with heroin or by users who believe they are taking heroin. Carfentanil is added to or sold as heroin because it is less expensive, easier to obtain and easier to make than heroin." 

This statement, though true is sometimes misleading, because people read it and believe drugs are cut with fent or carfent because they are "cheaper". Yes a kilo of carfent can be bought online from China for let's say $10,000, so yes it is alot cheaper than heroin which might cost $60-80k... but cutting agents cost hundreds of dollars not thousands, so no they aren't used to cut other drugs though, they are sold AS other drugs. When synthetic opiods such as fent, carfent, and the few others in the same family were brought here, they were cut and sold as heroin. When being cut, the costs diminished even further, and profit margins rose. If you can take one kilo which costs $10,000 and make it into 10, your cost is $1000 per kilo and you sell for $60,000 each at wholesale, you've made a profit of $590,000 off the importation of ONE KILO. The reason so many people started dying when it was first introduced is because the only way to gauge the strength of your product is you sell it and see response. People die, ok you know you can cut it more and increase your profit. People complain, and you know you've cut it too much. There is alot of trial and error. The other reason factor contributing to the crisis we currently face is the jump in strength from prescription opiods, to synthetic black market opiods. Unfortunately, many people who are addicted to opiods haven't been life long drug abusers, many could have been up til recently, hard working regular 9-5 people, who had some sort of injury, and got addicted to their pain killers. They are more vulnerable to ODing, than someone who has been using for many years. Just over 5 years ago, fentanyl was introduced locally as time release patches. But you take that same patch and cook it up and extract all its' content and inject it, and you will die. And I remember, when Oxycodone pills were hard to find on the street people looked for fent patches. (at this time, mex had not caught onto the fent wave, meth was the new popular drug to produce/sell)
Alot of these problems have started with the legitimate pharma industry, and later a criminal says hey I see an opportunity to exploit.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
Blanco, muy gracias.

I've looked over your numbers and completely agree with what you are stating.

Hard for me to understand though, a legitimate pharma industry?  What legitimate concern, buys a product like this, does not cut and administers to a patient?

Only systems in my opinion, going to the lowest cost.  Does that not tell you of the profit potential outside the ER?  Yeah, easy to see the potential for sure, to make money.  

Know the Sackler family, of Purdue Pharma who marketed OxyContin.  They were founded in 1892, and saw this opportunity for filthy riches to the tune of $3,000,000,000/year regardless, of the lives they murdered.  What did they care, if they could dress, dine and live in the best of places.  A world tragedy.

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Re: Fentanyl

canadiana
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That makes total sense Blanco Puro.Sounds right on the money what you explained about not using fentanyl as cut but as the main drug.I'm sure they use something less expensive than fentanyl that would be local.Something that could be easily dissolved in a spoon for 'shooting purposes' for those inclined.Flour would be a hell of a lot cheaper to cut a potent drug with than fentanyl.In the 80's they used to use baby laxative (Manitol).Don't know if that is still used anymore but if they can cut something fairly pure by 10 or even 20% that's 20% more pure profit in the dealer's pocket and add that just like a legal business he gets it cheaper because he buys in volume and doles out many small transactions and that's where the $$ is made.Simple math.
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Re: Fentanyl

canadiana
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In reply to this post by blanco puro
That makes total sense Blanco Puro.Sounds right on the money what you explained about not using fentanyl as cut but as the main drug.I'm sure they use something less expensive than fentanyl that would be local.Something that could be easily dissolved in a spoon for 'shooting purposes' for those inclined.Flour would be a hell of a lot cheaper to cut a potent drug with than fentanyl.In the 80's they used to use baby laxative (Manitol).Don't know if that is still used anymore but if they can cut something fairly pure by 10 or even 20% that's 20% more pure profit in the dealer's pocket and add that just like a legal business he gets it cheaper because he buys in volume and doles out many small transactions and that's where the $$ is made.Simple math.BTW love the cool pink pistol.
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Re: Fentanyl

Parro
This post was updated on .
Flour doesn't mix with water, unless it's a biscuit  
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Re: Fentanyl

B00Mer
In reply to this post by Parro


This is a photo of a girl in a wheelchair giving a drugs to an individual already passed out in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

The drugs are given free to addicts.

Marijuana is also legal and for sale everywhere..

If you think legalization is the solution, you're absolutely fucked in the head, it's beyond stupidity.

Legalization does increase drug use and addiction, the ultimate cost is to society and taxpayers getting these people cleaned up and in many cases off the streets.
Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr
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