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Discussion type thread deally..

Baggy
This post was updated on .
Those of you who can be bothered please read "Awe and fear: Politicised gangs of Venezuela" @ AJE And let me know what you think.. It has me curious because as i have stated before i honestly think there are death squads and paramilitary groups running around mexico,runnin drugs and doing wetwork for politicos or ''Social Cleansing" as some put it. This most recent mass kidnapping seems like something FARC would pull and not cartel work.. so yeh it does make me wonder and i wanted to gauge peoples thoughts on the matter of paramilitaries (Not cartels) in mexico.Ive asked before during other posts on things but without a dedicated topic on the matter the responses get lost in the tangle of different stories and replies. From what i can find online its almost like these types of groups suddenly vanished from the scene,were absorbed by cartels or have gone deeper underground.. If there is such a thing as ''underground'' in mexico thesedays since everything dirty seems to be out in the open now.
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Jorge Jorvanivich
I get a page not found message.
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Siskiyou_Kid
In reply to this post by Baggy
The correct link is HERE
Those that say, don't know. Those that know, don't say.
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Sleep
In reply to this post by Baggy
I think La Tuta loves his own voice so much that he would already released video denying involvement in that kidnapping if it wasn't them.
O te alineas o te mueres.
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_Jack
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_Jack
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Lala
In reply to this post by Baggy
Good post, interesting topic.

There has always been dirty game from the government, and now with the PRI back in power we can only expect even more of that, you keep reading now and then about convenient deaths or disappearances that have nothing to do with narcos or "normal" crime, indigenous rights activists, miner strike leaders and such. Those incarcerated for the Acteal massacre were freed in March or April if I remember well. Anyways, I have no real knowledge about this, but we all have heard of police and militars acting pretty much like death squads at times -and nothing happens!- so at the very least we do have those...which is pretty much the same stuff I guess? maybe on top of that we do have government death squads as separate entities, I don't know but it wouldn't surprise me, they existed in the past.

As far as paramilitary or guerrilla groups like those elsewhere in Latin America, I don´t think so, EZLN are more into la otra campaña than into guerrilla stuff and other groups are linked to cartels, like PUCD to Caballeros Templarios.

I'd like to know more, hopefully other posters can add some info.

The Tepito kidnappings...I don't know, it smells like cartel to me, sadly it's only unusual because of where it happened, had it been in a different state no one would be wondering who did it.
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Baggy
Links fixed, i think i missed an "L" in there somewhere.

Time will tell, the PRI and the PAN both ran paramilitaries from what i have read in the past, while on the topic of Acteal LaLa you can find some interesting stuff here http://compamanuel.wordpress.com/2013/05/31/teachers-protests-in-guerrero/ .. only found it the other day so i havnt had much time to look into it yet but seems to be some good articles in there..
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Lala
Thanks for the link Baggy, that fucked up education reform!.

Yep the Mexican governments have an ugly track record in these issues.
DD
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DD
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Baggy, thanks for posting the question.  You know how I love a good discussion type thread.

Like many things in Mexico, it is not as simple as it first seems.  The first problem is defining "paramilitary" groups.   Many people define the Zetas as a paramilitary group.  All of the original Zs were exmilitary and even today new recruits receive some military type training.   But I know you said you weren't talking about cartels.

You narrowed your question somewhat by saying  "groups running around mexico, runnin drugs and doing wetwork for politicos"  

Some may classify the "self defense" groups and "citizens militias" that are spring up all over as paramilitary.  I personally don't think we really know enough about them to put them in that category.  Time will tell and they may well evolve into groups that fit in your definition.

As far as "politicos" using death squads and paramilitary groups to do "wetwork", with one exception i don't think that is prevalent as it once was.  Simply because now with all the other violence in Mexico they simply use the army or police to do their wetwork without much fear of any repercussions.  

One new factor that does concern me is EPN creating the new police force, the  " gendarmerie".  It is to be a 35,000 strong police force basically reportable only to him.  To me the concept of a Presidential police force is frightening.   It brings to mind the use of special presidential police by some  Latin American dictators to repress opposition.  

As reported in a recent report in the LA Times;
"Some of the most important civic groups in Mexico are imploring President Enrique Peña Nieto to let Congress debate the wisdom of creating a new paramilitary police force, or gendarmerie, to combat the persistent scourge of violence here.

The civic groups are concerned that Peña Nieto will create the new force by presidential decree, instead of introducing a bill in the Legislature. Without a vigorous debate in Congress, the groups fear, the gendarmerie may suffer from an ill-defined mandate and lack important human rights protocols, among other things."

The one exception about the govt. or politicos no longer using paramilitary or death squads is the repression of the indigenous people (many of Mayan descent)  in Chiapas and Oaxaco, and San Luis Potosi.  Often referred to erroneously collectively as the "Zapatistas".  

Mexico has a long history of repression of these indigenous people even though the Constitution of 1917 specifically guarantees them many rights.  Though their resistance to government repression of those rights is today mostly peaceful and non violent, the govt. still views them as a threat.

In my opinion, the recent meeting of the Chiapas Secretary of Public Defense and the Israeli Defense Ministry is an ominous sign.   Learning from the Israeli experience of dealing with the Palastinians in Isreal might prove useful to the Secretary of Defense and not so good for the indigenous people.

In the past, specifically during the administration of Ernesto Zadillo, (1994-2000) there were two famous massacres of indigenous people in Chiapas.  

The Aguas Blancas Massacre was a massacre that took place on 28 June 1995, in Aguas Blancas, Guerrero, Mexico, in which, according to the official version, 17 farmers were killed and 21 injured. Members of the Organización Campesina de la Sierra Sur (South Mountain Range Farmer Organization) were en route to Atoyac de Álvarez to attend a protest march demanding the release of Gilberto Romero Vázquez, a peasant
activist arrested more than a month before (and who has never appeared since). They were also marching to demand drinking water, schools, hospitals and roads, among other things. According to survivors, they were ambushed by the motorized police and several were shot point blank. Some of the events were captured on film, by the police themselves. Weapons were subsequently placed in the dead farmers' hands and the police said they acted in self-defense.

Maria de Luz Núñez Ramos, then Mayor of the municipality of Atoyac de Alvarez, said in an interview, former Guerrero gov. Rubén Figueroa communicated by telephone with her the night before and hours after the attack on the members of the peasant organization of the South Sierra (OCSS).  In the first call, Figueroa Alcocer said  that the State Government would mount a special operation to stop the farmers. In the second conversation, the Governor would have celebrated the attack before the Mayor: "they came to war and war they had!  "Are we the authority or are we not? ".

The Acteal Massacre was a massacre of 45 people attending a prayer meeting of Roman Catholic indigenous townspeople, including a number of children and pregnant women, who were members of the pacifist group Las Abejas ("The Bees").   It was carried out on December 22, 1997 by the paramilitary group Mascara Roja, or Red Mask.  

Soldiers at a nearby military outpost did not intervene during the attack, which lasted for hours. The following morning, soldiers were found washing the church walls to hide the blood stains.  Some of the pregnant women who were part of the prayer group were stabbed and shot in the belly intentionally to kill their unborn children.

The Las Abejas activists professed support for the goals of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional - EZLN), including their rejection of applying violent means. Many suspect this affiliation as the reason for the attack, and government involvement or complicity.

34 people from  neighboring villages were convicted of the murders and sentenced to 40 years in prison, but the Supreme Court freed 20 of those convicted because of "prosecutorial misconduct".  

Survivors and heirs of Mexican Indian villagers who were killed in the massacre filed a lawsuit in the US 10 years after the massacre against  former President Zedillo accusing him of crimes against humanity.  The lawsuit was filed in the US because Zedillo was living in the US teaching at Yale University.

The context to what happened starts in 1994, when the Zapatista movement in Chiapas rose up in arms against the Mexican state. A peace agreement was reached with the Zapatistas before Zedillo came into office, but the lawsuit alleges he was not in favor of the agreement and preferred an offensive against the insurgents.

One possible motive for further squashing the Zapatistas was to reassure world markets that Mexico was stable, the lawsuit alleges.

According to the complaint, Zedillo authorized the army to train and equip anti-Zapatista groups to help crush the uprising.  The lawsuit further alleges that Zedillo and his attorney general covered up the massacre by telling the media that the deaths were the result of local infighting. A report from the attorney general's office also cited the
Zapatistas as being responsible for the killings.

The United States Department of State intervened in the lawsuit and recommended that President Zedillo be granted immunity from prosecution due to the actions occurring as part of his official capacity
as head of state.

Death squads were used by the Mexican govt. well before the massacres of 1995 and 1997.  In Mexico's "dirty war" against insurgents and left wing opponents in the 60's and 70's, death squads were used to eliminate specific targets who were perceived by the govt. as threats.  At least some of these murders were carried out by CIA trained recruits and some by the CIA itself.  

I know one person who was part of the CIA teams there were helicoptered into the jungle areas to seek out specific people that the Mex. government selected for elimination.  The targets were leaders of "insurgencies", left wing leaders, and communist.

As further evidence of the US involvement in the repression of the indigenous people, an article entitled Threat of Genocide: US Military Mapping Against Mexico’s Indigenous at  the website El Enemigo Común states "The facts are clear: indigenous communities in Mexico are being preyed upon by the US military with the help of Kansas University geographers.   "

In 2005, the Department of Geography at Kansas University received $500,000 in Department of Defense funds to map communally-held indigenous land in the Mexican states of San Luis Potosi and Oaxaca with the help of the US Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO), located at Fort Leavenworth Army base in Leavenworth, Kansas.

The FMSO researcher , Lt. Col. Geoffrey B. Demarest, is suspected of using the maps as military intelligence against indigenous communities that assert autonomy and self-determination through collectively governing and owning their territory. According to Demarest, the only path to ‘progress and security’ in Latin America is through the privatization of such types of communally-held land.

Demarest claims that “informally owned and unregulated land ownership favors illicit use and violence,” and that the only solution to these breeding grounds of crime and insurgency is the privatization and titling of the land.
"

Demarest was not only trained at the US Army School of the Americas—the facility famous for teaching torture and the creation of paramilitary death squads to Latin American military personnel—but also served as the US Military Attaché at the US Embassy in Guatemala between 1988 and 1991,

An essay he wrote while doing mapping in Columbia clearly states the ultimate use of the geographic data: “While the forensic value of land ownership data is relatively obvious, not so obvious is the correlation between land data and military strategy, but this correlation precisely marks an essential attribute of successful counterinsurgent campaigns.”

Oliver Froehling, geographer and academic director of the Universidad de la Tierra (University of the Earth) in Oaxaca city, highlights the danger of these mapping projects when he states:  "The control and displacement of indigenous communities intends to remove potential political hot spots, contribute to military control of the region, and ultimately ‘liberate’ natural resources for the benefit of the government and, in turn, its transnational allies.”

Even before the "dirty war", death squads and paramilitary groups were used in the little known war against the Catholic Church.  This war was called the Christero War.  It is not taught in Mexico history courses in the schools and Mexico would like for it to be forgotten (as it largely has been).  

President Plutarco Calles (the real founder of PRI) launched a direct attack on the Catholic Church using articles from Mexico's Constitution, which created this uprising and counter-revolution against the Mexican government during that time. The original rebellion was set off by the
persecution of Roman Catholics and a ban on their public religious practices.

The persecution began on Aug. 1, 1926, when the government re-enacted the penal code and forced the closure of all Catholic churches throughout the entire country with its new anticlerical laws. However, the first coordinated uprising for religious freedom did not occur until Jan. 1, 1927.

It was not until mid June 1929 when the truce was officially signed, bringing an end to the Cristero War.  I have been researching this episode in Mexican history for about 6 months and will post a story on it soon.  A movie was made on the war,  "For the Greater Glory".  Here is a trailer for the movie;



PRIVATE DEATH SQUADS


The use of death squads by businessmen has been used and probably still is being used in Mexico.  Probably Juarez is the best documented case of this happening.  I hope our "ace reporters like Tiajuana, Chivis,  K Mennem and others chime in and give us their insights on this.

In an article by Diana Washington Valdez of El Paso Times, she states businessmen in Juárez allegedly hired a group of Zetas in 2008 to protect themselves against kidnappings and extortions during the city's violent wave.  

A similar alliance of former soldiers and wealthy business leaders (landowners) was the genesis for Colombia’s ruthless, right-wing paramilitary force known as the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (AUC) [United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia].  The AUC grew out of a smaller vigilante death squad called Los Pepes, which was
established in the early 1990s to battle narco-trafficking as well — in particular, the notorious Colombian bandito Pablo Escobar.

Most of Ms. Diana Washington Valdez  article is based upon a Wikileaks US State Dept. cable released in 2011.  The cable drafted by the U.S. consulate in Juárez in late January 2009, provides the following description of the Pepes-like paramilitary group established in Juárez:


Baggy, I hope this gives you enough to have a discussion thread (maybe several)

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar/27/world/la-fg-mexico-gendarmerie-20130328

http://mexicoinstitute.wordpress.com/2013/06/11/mexico-has-held-talks-with-the-israeli-defence-ministry-on-confronting-the-zapatistas-of-chiapas/

http://www.elpasotimes.com/newupdated/ci_17627581

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zedillo

http://www.cnn.com/2011/09/20/world/americas/mexico-zedillo-lawsuit/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acteal_massacre

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguas_Blancas_massacre

http://elenemigocomun.net/2009/06/threat-genocide-military-mapping/

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar/27/world/la-fg-mexico-gendarmerie-20130328

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2011/03/evidence-extrajudicial-death-squads-emerging-mexico

Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

Chivis
Administrator
DD

I not only posted about death squads twice I translated the entire El Universal article of all type of death squads...
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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jlopez
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by DD
I enjoyed this thread a lot. Much  to comment: Mexican governments, both state and federal, have been attempting for decades (centuries, actually) to expropriate lands owned by indigenous people in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Whereas in the past these lands were considered too remote to bother with, that very remoteness protected them from exploitation so they are very desirable now. Since indigenous communities do not have much political presence, they are ideal victims for attacks with police and military.

The Mexican federal government uses several schemes to steal from indigenous communities:

1.     Give foreign corporations license to explore and exploit mineral concessions located in or adjacent to indigenous communities. By the time the tribes/pueblos/ejidos protest, litigate, get an amparo, etc., the looting is pretty much accomplished and the communities are left to deal with environmental devastation. Despite their PR image of friendly, quaint folks, Canadian mining companies are probably the worst offenders in Mexico.  

2.     At the state level, the governors allow their friends to trespass, divert water, cut timber, etc., and ignore tribal authorities when they complain. Governments also allow these same cronies to attack the indigenous community representatives. This is happening in Chihuahua with the Tarahumaras and in Sonora with the Yaquis. It is also happening in too many other places to name. In fact, the Yaquis and the Tarahumaras have actually won their lawsuits in state and federal courts, but state governments simply ignore court orders.

3.     Other tricks: Pena Nieto and one of his Atlacomulco buddies are building a highway that crosses over indigenous lands. (I will do the research if anybody is interested, but I just wanted to describe the trick). Since opposition was almost unanimous, EPN and Co. allowed about 400 non-indigenous individuals to register as "Indians", then held the legally-mandated hearings to obtain approval from the real owners. Only these 400 individuals --neo-Indians, as it were-- attended and voted for approval. To prevail, the communities must first prove that the 400 were not community members, then try to use that to get an amparo, etc. By then, the road will be built...

One last point: I thought I would mention that a very famous "corrido" is from the Cristero war. It is called "Valentin de la Sierra." In relevant part, the song says, "Virgen mia de Guadalupe, por tu religion me van a matar..." (Virgin of Guadalupe, they're going to kill me because of your religion.)    
DD
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DD
In reply to this post by Baggy
@Baggy.  The stories which Chivis referred to that she wrote are "Social Cleansing Not Drugwar" at http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Social-Cleansing-Not-Drugwar-tp4019605.html
and MEXICO: The Killing of Innocents, by Cartels, Police, Military and Death Squads at http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2012/05/mexico-killing-of-innocents-by-cartels.html

Both of those are great articles and worth reading or reading again if you have read them previously.  However, your request was for info on death squads and paramilitary excluded cartels in such a role.  

The article that she referred to that she translated from El Universal is dead on point (pardon the pun).  The article and her translation were so good that it has been picked up and posted on other blogs and media outlets.  Becoming more and more common with her articles.  When I did a Yahoo search of "Cisen report on death squads" 5 of the first 7 hits were Chivis article that had been posted elsewhere.  (Probably there were more that did not give credit to her).

The El Universal article dealt with several Mexican Senators asking the Center for Investigation and National Security (CISEN)  for a report on the use of death squads in Mexico.  Here is the article;

"Traces of Paramilitary:  Legislators contend the State permits the existence of death squads
Investigation: Due to massive numbers of executions, the Senate of the Republic asks CISEN for reports on the existence of death squads.

Ignacio Alvarado Álvarez
El Universal
Monday October 18, 2010

In September, the Senate formally requested detailed reports from CISEN (Center for Investigation and National Security) on the existence of criminal groups that they termed "death squads," because they are implicated as those responsible for 28,000 killings.

On the morning of Tuesday October 12, 2010, eleven police in Sinaloa were shot while patrolling a road on the outskirts of Culiacán.  Eight were killed and three wounded. The next day, in Chihuahua, the chief custodians of the local prison and five bodyguards were killed minutes after finishing their work shifts.
No authority has linked incidents, however, the only probable connection has come to light for the first time, that one branch of the state has acknowledged what so far the federal government has denied the involvement of paramilitary groups in the drug war.

In September, the Senate formally asked the Center for Investigation and National Security (CISEN) to provide detailed reports on the existence of these groups, which they termed "death squads" because they are indicated as bearing the responsibility for a large percentage of the 28,000 murders officially recognized in this war, as well as thousands of forced disappearances.

"These groups operate outside the law with the complicity, recognition and/or tolerance of the Mexican state," said Ricardo Monreal Avila, coordinator of the Parliamentary Group of the Labor Party, and one of the promoters of the request for the CISEN reports. Considering the fact that these groups are composed of thousands of soldiers and officers who have deserted from the army, as well as many police who have been fired for being corrupt, the senator added that these groups are composed of “well-trained paramilitaries."

A year ago, Mauricio Fernandez, Mayor of San Pedro Garza Garcia, shocked the country when he revealed at his inauguration the murder of Hector Saldaña Perales, a.k.a. “El Negro,” an alleged extortionist and drug dealer who was harassing local entrepreneurs.

The extraordinary thing is that the mayor’s announcement anticipated the official identification of the victim that would be made hours later by the Attorney General in the Federal District where the body was found. In the same speech the mayor announced the formation of a (grupo rudo)  "tough group,”  coordinated by his government to confront high-level criminals such as Saldaña.

According to Monreal Avila, who governed Zacatecas between 1998 and 2004, the episode sums up the reality of the country.

"This mayor is not the only one (to employ paramilitaries). Governors have extermination groups, groups dedicated to “cleansing” that train and select elite teams who act outside the law. Only now, the Senate is recognizing their existence and we are waiting for official information. It would be Kafkaesque if they wereto say that these groups do not exist. ”The growing number of murders, kidnappings and extortion has also led employers to recruit such groups, reiterates Monreal.

The senator claims to have reports that this occurs in industrialized cities in Jalisco, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila and Tamaulipas. What makes the picture even bloodier is that organized crime, or certain segments of organized crime are protected by the authorities. Their reports will be reserved until the release of the federal government's official version comes out, but he did not explain the reason for his decision.

Before the senators went to CISEN for these reports, civil organizations in Baja California, Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Tamaulipas, Michoacán and Guerrero have been documenting paramilitary operations for years.

CHRONOLOGY OF EXTERMINATION

In the early 1990's, the lawyer Miguel Angel García Leyva and other citizens formed in Sinaloa Front Against Impunity. For 10 years, they gathered evidence on the activities of "death squads, causing thousands of kidnappings and killings in the state." These groups were made up of police or military personnel.

"The participation of these squads is known publicly not only in Sinaloa, but throughout the country," he says. "They operate dressed in official uniforms, driving patrol cars, and with weapons, badges and keys just like the forces of the state."

In 2001, Garcia changed his residence to Baja California. There he helped to form the Esperanza Association with the families of disappeared persons. In nine years the group worked on the cases of 8,000 victims, four times more than those acknowledged by the state attorney. All of them, he says, were abducted by paramilitaries.

"In Baja California these extermination squads have been named “Black Commandos” and their presence has been noted especially since mid-2005 to date. And there is evidence to conclude that many of their actions have been to kill people, not just to disappear them. There are political disappearances as well as those of impunity, all of them resulting from this war that is fratricidal and mistaken," said García.
To date, no charge against the organization has been successful in court. The reason, says the lawyer, is corruption. "We cannot just talk about groups of thugs, gunmen, sicarios and drug trafficking activities; these accusations imply the full participation of the state."

To confirm this, he cites an investigation conducted between May 2008 and May 2010 along the highways in northwestern Mexico. They produced video, photographs and written reports on police and military checkpoints in Nayarit, Sinaloa, Sonora and Baja California. "The results astounded us,  most of the checkpoints are not only points of extortion, but places to identify and locate people to disappear, assassinate or commit other acts against them," says Garcia.

BLACK NUMBERS/LAS CIFRAS NEGRAS

There are many extermination operations occurring in these states, but very few come to public light.
He cites another example. In August, a group invaded the town of El Sasabe an ejido near the border in northern Sonora that has become a main illegal crossing point into the United States—and massacred 40 people. "The silence is terrible. No account is given of what actually happens and if it were possible to reveal these “black operations” we would see that there are not 28,000 dead as the government says, but rather, but more than 40,000."

Cases of extermination have also been documented over time in other states such as Chihuahua.
Between November 1995 and February 1996, the State Attorney General received complaints about the disappearances of 375 people. Witnesses of several of these abductions said that they saw subjects involved in the actions who identified themselves as federal police. In one case, the sister of two of the victims, and Armando and Francisco Rayos Jaquez, obtained the registration of one of the vehicles used by the kidnappers. This registration document belonged to the official vehicle assigned to the delegate of the Attorney General’s office at the time, Arturo Chavez Chavez, the same person who is now the Attorney General of the Republic.

The remains of nine of those victims were unearthed in December 1999 on a ranch on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, known as La Campana. Of the rest, no information ever came to light. The Association of Friends and Relatives of the Disappeared has records of 180 of these cases. Only 37 of them ever resulted in a judicial inquiry.

Jaime Hervella, president of that organization, said, "What I can tell you is that according to the statement by the federal prosecutor in charge of the investigation, Enrique Cocina Martinez, state and federal police were involved in each of these cases. I do not know if there are death squads in the city. I do not have evidence to prove that statement. But I can say that now, they do not even bother to abduct them and take them away. Now, they just kill them and throw them into the street."

In 2007, according to data from the State Attorney General, a little more than 300 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez. But between 2008 and so far in 2010, the figure has reached nearly seven thousand homicides. Of that total, more than half was members of street gangs and juvenile offenders, which leaves no doubt according to civil organizations such as the National Front against Repression, that what is going on is something other than a war between drug cartels. What is actually taking place is a "social cleansing."

In Nuevo Laredo and Reynosa, similar practices have been used since the beginning of the decade, said Raymundo Ramos, director of the Center for Human Rights of Nuevo Laredo.

Gang members from both cities became a serious threat to society and the government made use of armed groups to exterminate them, according to reports gathered by Ramos.

"The gangsters attacked police as well as civil society, staged gunfights over territory, raped women, raided schools and universities, robbed businesses and even banks.  Then, when the narco-trafficking rose to a higher level, the first thing they did was to subdue/take over control of the gangs and use them as their informants, couriers and hired killers/sicarios. The drug trafficking organizations have made the street gangs into a disposable criminal network."

What followed was a second round of killings in recent months: "The reports we have are that the majority of criminals killed in clashes or attacks with organized crime groups or against federal authorities are young, kids who have not even reached 20. Here in Nuevo Laredo have at least 15 reports from young people against the military of torture, rape, extrajudicial killing and forced disappearance.”


Corruption and impunity

What is being waged in the country is not a war against organized crime, but extermination, says Mercedes Murillo Monge, president of the Sinaloan Civic Front.

"It is difficult to prove who promotes these death squads. In fact, it is impossible. No one knows because no one investigates. The corruption is huge, the impunity is absolute. What we as a united front can say is that in this so-called war, very many innocent people have been assassinated by the authorities," she said.

What Murillo has found out about the cases in Sinaloa is similar to what other citizens’ organizations have discovered that there is a notable increase in the number of murders and disappearances since the beginning of the government’s anti-crime operations.

In the framework of this "war," said Rosario Ibarra de Piedra, president of the Human Rights Commission of the Senate, "it is mostly “ninis” (the slang term for ‘ni trabajan, ni estudian’ young people who neither work nor go to school and so are susceptible to street gangs) who are being abducted and taken away, that is, these people that the government has deemed expendable. They are people no one wants or needs and so they might as well die. What do we want withthem, especially when they are seen as trouble, as obstacles to the needs and desires of certain elites?”

Ibarra, who for 35 years has denounced the existence of death squads financed by the government, cites two cases to support the theory of social cleansing. First, a massacre in July at the Quinta de Torreón at ,a gay and lesbian party.  Then, the remains of 51 people that were exhumed from a clandestine grave in the Municipality of Juarez, Nuevo León. Those bodies were "all covered with tattoos."

"Right now we cannot venture to say that there is training or tolerance on the part of the Army, or that they have knowledge of such death squads. We have not yet reached the point where we can say that,” says Sen. Ricardo Monreal. But what is certain is that "four years after this began and after four years of justification by the spokesmen of the government and the military hierarchy, what we can certainly say is that this strategy was very wrong.” .


DD.  I have searched for the CISEN report which the Senators requested but could not find anything on it.  If you know what that report said, please post that info.
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

Baggy
So unlike comlumbia,peru and other latin american countries where the govt left or right setup paramilitaries to control turf, dissidents and each other and then they turned to smuggling drugs for funds, we have a different situation in mexico because the cartels are already so well established and linked with the governments and already in drug trafficking and have large cache's of weapons and armed wings they don't need to branch out any further.. this is just a quick reply ive been having trouble with the forums tonight, extra busy perhaps? kept getting errors constantly, but yeah i had read those articles when chivis first put them together but i wanted to know if anyone had anything new on some of the more recent events if any new factions had been established, perhaps something will happen depending on who wins the state elections? thats whats on at the mo isnt it? Wonder if Morris or Chon el burro will setup their own hit squads.. Will read your posts when i get on tomorrow DD & thanks guys for keeping the conversation going.
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

K_Mennem
I just briefly skimmed through this thread. I will go back and read more into it.

Are you putting "hired mercenaries" into this discussion? Men that do not belong to an organized crime group and do not personally have cartel ties but will hire out as security and do dirty deeds...

I have been slowly working on a piece on how every security guard in Mexico has an automatic weapon, yet weapons are banned in Mexico. I want to go in-depth on Mexico gun laws and how to get a gun. I feel like nobody asks what these guys go do after they are done guarding the jewelry store (or bank ect). They have bullet proof vests and tactical gear. You dont think if they are short on cash some of them are doing other things as well?
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

Baggy
@K-mennem YEah PMC's or mercs would fall into it.. Very good question about 9 to 5 security guards.

Anyone here good with wikileaks search ?? >.<

there is supposedly a few conversations that "MX1" has with some people about CDS using the police against the juarez people but having issues finding anything relevant or with that particular contact MX1.. They are diplomatic cables... ill post it if i find it.
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
mik
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

mik
Hi Baggy, this post
http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Wikileaks-MX1-emails-td4031771.html#a4031898
might be able to put you on the right path. But prob still a lot of hunting around involved.

I did try downloading some of the files at the time in the hope of finding more MX1 but didn't find him, if he was there he was well submerged in all the other shit. I will give it another go when I have some time.
mik
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

mik
Also, here
http://variousenthusiasms.wordpress.com/2009/04/28/the-sicario-a-juarez-hit-man-speaks-by-charles-bowden-harpers/
is a 2009 story about a "gun for hire" type sicario.

QUOTE:
But now we turn to the time he worked for the devil.

He is in high school when the state police recruit him and his friends. They get $50 to drive cars across the bridge to El Paso, where they park them and walk away. They never know what is in the cars, nor do they ever ask. After the delivery, they are taken to a motel where cocaine and women are always available.

He drops out of the university because he has no money. And then the police dip into his set of friends who have been moving drugs for them to El Paso. And send them to the police academy. In his own case, because he is only seventeen, the mayor of Juárez has to intervene to get him into the academy.

“We were paid about a hundred and fifty pesos a month as cadets,” he says, “but we got a bonus of $1,000 a month that came from El Paso. Every day, liquor and drugs came to the academy for parties. Each weekend, we bribed the guards and went to El Paso. I was sent to the FBI school in the United States and taught how to detect drugs, guns, and stolen vehicles. The training was very good.”

After graduation, no one in the various departments really wanted him because he was too young, but U.S. law enforcement insisted he be given a command position. And so he was.

“I commanded eight people,” he continues. “Two were honest and good. The other six were into drugs and kidnapping.”

Two units of the State Police in Juárez specialized in kidnapping, and his was one such unit. The official assignment of both units was to stop kidnapping. In reality, one unit would kidnap the person and then hand the victim over to the other unit to be killed, a procedure less time-consuming than guarding the victim until the ransom was paid. Sometimes they would feign discovering the body a few days after the abduction.

That was the orderly Juárez he once knew. Then in July 1997, Amado Carrillo Fuentes, the head of the Juárez cartel, died. This was an “earthquake.” Order broke down. The payments to the State Police from an account in the United States ended. And each unit had to fend for itself.
DD
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DD
In reply to this post by Baggy
@Baggy, You might try one of my favorite read for fun sites, The Mex Files.  Just under his banner where the "Home", "About", etc. buttons are is a button "WIKILEAKED MEXICO CABLES".

http://mexfiles.net/wikileaked-mexico-cables/ 
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
DD
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Re: Discussion type thread deally..

DD
In reply to this post by Baggy
@Baggy.  This is from Proceso and was written by Congressman Ricardo Monreal Avila, who with his brother Senator David Monreal, was the target of a plot of assassination in April of this year.  

Ricardo Monreal served as Zacatecas governor from 1998-2004.  He later served as a key campaign official for former leftist presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in his failed bids for the presidency in 2006 and 2012.

After failing to get the PRI nomination for Governor of  Zacatecas, he resigned from the party and switched sides to the PRD.  He was then elected as the PRD candidate.

Monreal was one of the leaders in Congress which asked CISEN (Center for Investigation and National Security) for a report on death squads in Mexico.  I think this article may be excerpted from that report, but I have not confirmed that.  (link http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Social-Cleansing-Not-Drugwar-tp4019605.html)

                             

Elite assassins, trained to kill


BookDeath squads in Mexico (Chamber of Deputies, 2013), Ricardo Monreal Ávila, reproduced with the permission of publishers three testimonies of people trained as specialists in covert operations, true elite hit men hired to remove to ringleaders of the crime or to fight the army, depending on who is your employer in turn. They are the new products on the market of the violence that has become the country.

Juan Ignacio, 30-year-old, currently part of a corps of elite of the Mexican Navy. He joined this security force in 2007, weeks after leaving the heroic school Naval Militar de Anton Lizardo, Veracruz, by invitation.

Expresses one of their coaches teachers and physical... Not having completed their studies was not impediment to recruitment; their skills in weapons handling and good physical condition made it suitable candidate.

At the naval base in the port of Veracruz he was (called) to appear with clothing and accoutrements of training because it would be concentrated in a distant place, for three weeks. With a group of 14 young people he departed the next day to a farm in the Veracruz Huasteca, an hour from the town of Alamos, which only is reached by a dirt road heading to the Sierra Madre Oriental. Before arriving, you could note that two marine checkpoints guarding access.

The farm is actually a training camp at the foot of the sierra, with a main house and bedrooms to go  around, and five sections or well-defined areas: 1) the shooting range; (2) the field of Beltway of obstacles; (3) the area of detection, armed and disarmed explosives; ((4) section of scaling and jump to rappel, & 5) an area for the use of motor vehicles, from the mountain to armoured vehicles motorcycles, where rehearses the assault on cars moving, intercept them and immobilization with weapons of high calibre, as grenade and rocket launchers. Here also are taught to face ambushes and protect themselves against surprise assaults.

Training here would be the first of three courses in a span of a year and a half. A month after that initial, Juan Ignacio would be coming to Colombia to its second training. On this occasion, the Group was formed by 22 young people, who arrived in three distinct groups: eight were marine; seven members of the army; and seven of the Federal Police. In only one night they arrived in Bogota then concentrated for over four months in the province of Tolima, in the facilities of the National Center for training and operations police of Colombia.

The training focused on techniques of assault and capture of drug traffickers and high-profile criminals, entrenched in mountain areas, jungle caves or urban fortresses, with true armies private in their custody. They were also taught to infiltrate these paramilitary groups, to identify clandestine training camps, to perform covert assault operations, to dismantle synthetic drugs laboratories, to detect hidden fields from illegal in jungles and mountains, to handle explosives, jumping from vehicles running or flush, attending wounded, to spy on helicopters and contraespiar, to identify designs and constructions of double bottom and survive for dayshidden and without food, in aggressive geographies...

The third course would be in the United States, in the State of Arizona, during the fall of 2008, with a duration of 12 weeks. The training focused on the prevention, detection, neutralization and destruction of terrorist threats, these were objects, people or civil groups. There, Juan Ignacio learned the doctrine that terrorism and drug trafficking represent the same level of threat to security; He was also instructed in techniques of intelligence, counterintelligence, tracking and processing of sensitive data, encryption and physical and psychological crisis management language.

http://www.proceso.com.mx/?p=346257
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.