Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

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Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

Slappy
https://www.infobae.com/america/mexico/2020/03/30/coronavirus-el-nombre-del-nuevo-enemigo-de-los-carteles-de-la-droga/

The quarantine and multiple checkpoints in the country where the coronavirus originated make it almost impossible for cartels to keep their clandestine laboratories operating at optimal levels.They were also affected by the interruption and constant restrictions of international travel that disrupted the chains of chemical supplies that require
By Mike Vigil *

The arrival of the coronavirus has been greatly felt in a large part of the world, and people worry about their health and economies falter, but it is ironic that the pandemic has had a positive result.

Drug trafficking organizations are not immune and also suffer from the health crisis. The chemical resources that they need so much for their operations have become scarcer and acquiring them is increasingly difficult.

Two of the most powerful organizations in the world, the Sinaloa cartel and the Jalisco Nueva GeneraciĆ³n (CJNG) cartel , dedicated to distributing various forms and quantities of drugs, have been unable to maintain a constant flow of chemicals from China , their main provider for this type of resources.

The quarantine and multiple checkpoints in the country where the coronavirus originated make it almost impossible for cartels to keep their clandestine laboratories operating at optimal levels. They were also affected by the interruption and constant restrictions on international travel that disrupted the chains of chemical supplies they require.


In February, China's manufacturing and service sectors fell to record levels. Although some Chinese factories are already reopening, working conditions are not good as they are not staffed and transportation remains a problem.

Alternate sources of chemicals for cartels, India and Germany, are also severely affected by the coronavirus, limiting mobility and closing deals to prevent the infection from spreading. Without a reliable source of chemicals, cartels have a hard time producing heroin, methamphetamines, and fentanyl.

Cocaine distribution will also be affected, as Colombia's transnational organizations, which produce and supply cartels, also do not find a constant distributor of the chemicals they require.

The United States has recently closed the border with Mexico in order to restrict any travel that is not considered necessary to stop the spread of the coronavirus. According to President Donald Trump, this will not affect exchange or legal trade.

Most of the illegal drugs smuggled into the United States from Mexico enter through different points throughout the two thousand miles where the two countries share the border. Most drugs are brought across the land border due to the large number of cars that cross it daily and the intense scrutiny on the records of large trucks.

It would be interesting to see the cartels make a change in their traffic method by opting for large trucks , if so, the Sinaloa cartel would be one of those who would opt for this method due to the large amount of agricultural products that come from that state. .

It is still too early to know the full impact that the pandemic will have on cartels, but if there is one thing for sure it is that they can quickly change and adapt their tactics. This ability is what, in part, has helped them survive.

* Former DEA Director of International Operations
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

Slappy
So apparently the cartels are running out of chemicals to make meth and fentanyl etc, but also the chemicals to process heroin and cocaine.  So the street drug supplies will completely dry up over the next month or two.

Right now on the streets here in Seattle it's pretty bleak.  The junkies at the homeless shelter I work at are all dopesick as hell right now because they have no way to make money.  See a lot of them flying signs at intersections looking very gray and making almost nothing because it's like christmas day traffic.  This virus will do damage to the cartels.  Will it take some of them down?

I read that CJNG has $100 billion in assets, but Mencho will let his low life sicarios starve thru this and they will start pulling robberies.
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

blanco puro
i doubt cjng has 100 billion!
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

canadiana
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

Ciro
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I would think Tse Chi Lop is making hand over fist right know.  CJNG 100 billion..    no way any cartel in Mexico or latin America has that.
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

canadiana
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J
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

J
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

canadiana
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Re: Coronavirus, the name of the new enemy of the drug cartels

leChef
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A different approach to Covid-19 in the drug cartel world:

Video:
https://twitter.com/Pendxjosdeltuit/status/1251904978781908997