Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
21 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Nutcase
 Cambridge —  Harvard University announced last week that former Mexican president Felipe Calderón will join the university for a yearlong residency, a decision that has garnered controversy as some experts and citizens protest Harvard’s appointment of a man with a mixed legacy.
 
Calderón, a Harvard graduate, will join Harvard as the first Angelopoulos Global Public Leaders Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, beginning in January 2013. During the course of his year as a fellow, Calderón will teach, learn, meet with students and collaborate with researchers.
 
In a press release, Harvard praised Calderón, who took office in Mexico in 2006, crediting him with boosting Mexico’s economy through pro-business and free market policies and with reforming the country’s healthcare, immigration and environmental policies.
 
"President Calderón is a vivid example of a dynamic and committed public servant, who took on major challenges in Mexico," said Harvard Kennedy School Dean David Ellwood in the press release. "He brings with him experience and knowledge that will inform and inspire Kennedy School students and faculty, and I am thrilled he will be returning to Harvard Kennedy School."
 
But Harvard’s decision to appoint Calderón to the position has rankled some experts who cite the thousands of drug-war related deaths in Mexico over the past six years as a reason why Calderón should not teach future leaders at Harvard. In the days after Harvard made its announcement, former U.S. Border Patrol agent John Randolph started a petition on the website Change.org calling on Harvard to withdraw its offer to Calderón. The petition states that Calderón’s increased use of military force to combat drug cartels in Mexico led to the deaths of innocent civilians.
 
 “Did Calderón use a gun to kill someone? No. But he ran a system that, what it did to Mexico, was very questionable,” said Randolph. “I just see it as a total slap in the face, not just to Mexican people and the families of the people who have died, but also the Americans. … in my view, [his appointment] is a reward because he played along with the drug war.”
 
As of press time, the petition had garnered nearly 2,100 signatures.
 
Angelica Ortiz Garza, a Mexican citizen and a California resident, started a similar petition in August when rumors circulated that Calderón was in talks with the University of Texas about a teaching position.


Like Randolph, Garza cited violence stemming from the war on drugs and the deaths of innocent civilians.
 
 “Teachers [at Harvard] say, these are just cartels killing each other,” said Garza, citing a Harvard Crimson article in which Harvard professors defended the university’s decision to appoint Calderón. “But that’s not the truth. There are many reports of human rights violations during the war.”
 
Morgan Smith, a Harvard graduate, a New Mexico resident and a freelance journalist who has traveled extensively in Mexico, said he supported Calderón when he was first elected in 2006. But Smith said after traveling in Juarez, a notoriously violent city affected by the drug war, he realized that military firepower wouldn’t stop the cartels.
 
 “I think Calderón had the right idea, but he had the wrong tactics and stubbornly refused to change. He kept saying that these were all bad people killing each other, but the newspaper reports would show there were two people killed yesterday, schoolgirls in the school yard,” said Smith. “I think this is a good person who had a good idea who, for reasons I don’t understand, got completely off track, caused a hell of a lot of damage to his country.”
 
Ellwood said in an email that the university stands by its appointment of Calderón because of its commitment to free speech and to the open exchange of ideas.
 
“We recognize that not everyone agreed with his policies or his approaches, as is the case with all world leaders, but one of the fundamental tenets of the Kennedy School and all American universities is a free exchange of ideas,” said Ellwood. “And in keeping with that educational mission, the school has a long and proud tradition of allowing our students the opportunity to engage with world leaders and to ask difficult questions on important


http://www.wickedlocal.com/cambridge/news/x1107418317/Controversy-brews-over-Harvard-s-appointment-of-former-Mexican-president#ixzz2EK5zEBCw
Seeing is believing
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

†.©ĤİVǾ.†
Banned User
This post was updated on .
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Nutcase
Watching America in decline too as we speak...  End of days, things will never get better.
Seeing is believing
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

El Regio
In reply to this post by Nutcase
Idiot Commies will never like him! Good for him and good for Harvard, the students will learn a lot from such a great man.

"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

jlopez
In reply to this post by Nutcase
Ever notice how many dictators or authoritarian leaders in Latin America graduated from U.S.  Ivy League universities? In fact, the only hope I have with respect to Enrique Pena Nieto is that he was educated entirely in Mexico. He's still ignorant, and has surrounded himself with corrupt people, but he may not be as good at repression as your average, U.S. Ivy League despot.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by El Regio
I agree reg.  it would be impossible not to surround ones self with at least in part corrupt individuals in Mexico.

He was not perfect, but I respect what he did and by far he was the president with the most integrity. just wait to see what these 6 years brings.  

which president was the first narco present?
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

drattler
In reply to this post by Nutcase
I like Calderon,I like having the Mexican Marines,with road blocks in Acuna,gives one at least the illusion that there is some law in Mexico. How did liberals take over the USA?
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

jlopez
Drattler: They were probably voted in. As usual, voters are the weak link in any democracy.  
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

El Regio
In reply to this post by Chivis
Yes Chivis any politician especially at the Presidential level will have some corruption within their group, it is human nature and it goes for both sides of the isle. You are correct, he did more than any other Mexican President, perhaps he started in the wrong area but his intentions were good and they have made a huge impact.
Areas all along the northern part of Mexico were becoming ghost towns and entire criminal organizations were brought to light including the corrupt governors that allowed them to operate in their state and frequently met with Cartel leaders. For that alone he deserves respect.

"The Tea Bag Party has a 10-15% approval rating. Depending on who you ask. ja ja ja" The wise Ajulio.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Phineas
In reply to this post by jlopez
jlopez wrote
Drattler: They were probably voted in. As usual, voters are the weak link in any democracy.
Nice Comment LOL I'll have to remember/use that line sometime jajaja
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Chataniux
In reply to this post by Nutcase
Calderon might not of gotten results as to violence going down but he did get rid of several high profile players in the game and the ones replacing them might not be as good. I know there was a lot of innocent casualties but it's hard to apprehend, every war has innocent casualties. He has made a road towards the future, it is only up to Peña Nieto whether he continues it even if its with a different approach.  
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

reynosa
Banned User
This post was updated on .
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

JesusTheMoose
 Calderon  should teach a class on courage. He has plenty of it. The status quo before Calderon and Fox was just a show. These men started a transformation in Mexico which no other "leaders" had the will or incentive to do. People need to wake up and realize that the old order under the PRI was poisoning the country and leading it toward a narco oligarchy. He's done a lot of good for Mexico and congratulate the people that elected him LAWFULLY.
The only object of liberty is life. -- G. K. Chesterton

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. -- Benjamin Franklin
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Mitch Oriso
In reply to this post by Nutcase
At Harvard they eat their own, they are passing up on a great opportunity.

The good thing is he can always go to Yale, Columbia, Cornell, Brown or he can come to Rice.

President Calderon, look forward to hearing from you. thank you for your courage.

Saludos

Micho

   
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

reynosa
Banned User
This post was updated on .
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
TRC
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

TRC
In reply to this post by Nutcase
For those of us that see Calderon as a power hungry man that would go to any lengths to prove his vision was correct, no matter how bad it was, this is an insult to US academia. It fits with the old saying, those that can'd do teach. He was at minimum an egregious failure and more likely an extremely greedy criminal for it is known that he was in bed with the biggest drug dealer in the world. He was a very active partner with the Sinaloa Cartel and ordered his military to make sausage of any northern city whose cartels wouldn't surrender to his business partner. He was a criminal not a hero. I have no doubt that he walked away from Mexico with enough money to match a significant portion of the entire endowment of Harvard. That is why they want him. Not because people are saying they want their children to learn from him. In many eyes, he is a war criminal including the International Court. I wonder if they would have allowed Hitler or will allow the Imperial Wizard of the KKK to engage their students in the name of "free speech and open exchange of ideas."
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by reynosa
I feel your frustration....but lets look at facts.  Each state is autonomous in the way the the US is, Mexico is also the UNITED STATES, individual states having the freedom to operate and establish law for themselves.

In 5 states along the frontera as well as many other states operate without regulation or law to keep a count of the drug dead nor the "missing".  BTW that includes my state of Coahuila and your state.

Coahuila is estimated in having one of the highest rates of missing people, yet their figures are 300-1000.  Tamps had a NGO that was keeping track of drug death tallies up until 3-4 years ago when they left "suddenly".

These complaints such as yours should be directed to the corrupt leaders of the frontera states.  A president in a developing country has to make tough choices and IMO Calderon was i BRAVE man, his mistakes IMO was having ineffective targets, Catch the Capo does nothing in the world of drugtrafficking, but boots on the ground was not a mistake and will not change.  

The drug war blame goes to the narco presidents, to find the first go back 50 years or so and move forward.  Fox tried to put boots on the ground in Nvo Laredo and look what happened.

and you seem to forget critical facts that we have gone from 4 cartels to 80-100 cartels.  It is a different drug war now, much of the fighting is between cartels not the government forces.

I think it is careless not to study Mexico and know what the facts are, how we got where we are and who is truly the blame.  At least Calderon tried and did some good, blame the corruption and narcos not a good man who tried.  remember...he who does nothing makes no mistakes
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

reynosa
Banned User
This post was updated on .
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

Chivis
Administrator
Oh trust me, I have called him arrogant ass and in that respect he is much like Obama...never changing course in a losing tactic.  That is not what I am saying.  and for the record Calderon did say he was wrong in that deployment format he instilled and wished he had done it differently.

He also is the first president to estimate the dead, the bodies in clandestine graves etc.  He can perform magic if states don't do their job.

But what I was speaking of is historical fact and though I have been in Mexico for a decade, one does not need to have a presence in Mexico to study the war, or else we would never have historical accounts which are written without a presence.

tell me which president was the first narco president?
tell me which president was stunned to read a report -on his first day- that narcos had control of the country.

I am willing to bet 99.1% of all citizens and 99.9% of all people do not know when, who, and how were culpable for narcos controlling the country, and THAT is the issue, not 60k dead, because the dead toll is much higher and decades long.  To only count the "war" as being when FINALLY a president step up to the plate and attacked narcos instead of when the first president decided he would be a front for narcos is ignorant at best.  

The issue is narcos governments that looked the other way for $$ and covert violence, not giving a rats ass about the United States, and stupidly never dreaming the narcos would become so wealthy it would be they that ruled the country for all intents and purpose ...for as much as they desired.

The war is different.  there are 80-100 cartels, splinter groups, gangs in 60 countries.  drugs are only 50% of the product of cartels, diversification in intelligence marketing products will surpass drugs by 2017, estimated by Bill Gates.  Knock offs, fuel theft, extortion and a home drug market have all played into a vastly different structure.

We have to be real and not generalize.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Controversy brews over Harvard’s appointment of former Mexican president

1966tinman
In reply to this post by Nutcase
I believe that Felipe Calderon's one year tenure at Harvard should be interesting and informative , especially for researchers , academians, and students .  As a National Security Studies / Economics  graduate  at UTEP I have had the priviledge  to learn , research , and formulate my own opinion on the so-called Mexican government's war on the drug cartels . Calderon's reasoning and decison making process during his six year term as president of Mexico should be examined , questioned , and scrutinized . Those in government who formulate and implement  public policy will undoubtly  learn some valuable lessons from  listening to Calderon's own words . I once read a book about the Vietnam War written by General William Westmoreland , the supreme commander of American armed forces in Vietnam , and his book layed out a lesson plan  for American leaders to follow in order to avoid future costly foreign wars .   Hopefully , Calderon will be forthcoming and honest in his assessment of his successes and failures as a leader . We can only learn a lot from him .
12