Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

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Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

canadiana
Administrator
NBC News    
Whitey Bulger juror regrets conviction after receiving dozens of letters from crime boss

The Associated Press
 
4 hrs ago
  
Janet Uhlar sits with letters and pictures she received from James "Whitey" Bulger at her home in Eastham, Mass., on Jan. 31, 2020. Uhlar was one of 12 jurors who found Bulger guilty in a racketeering case, but now regrets voting to convict him.© David Goldman  
   EASTHAM, Mass. — The notorious crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger terrorized Boston from the 1970s into the 1990s with a campaign of murder, extortion, and drug trafficking, then spent 16 years on the lam after he was tipped to his pending arrest.
 
   In 2013, Janet Uhlar was one of 12 jurors who found Bulger guilty in a massive racketeering case, including involvement in 11 murders, even after hearing evidence that the mobster was helped by corrupt agents in the Boston office of the FBI.

   But now Uhlar says she regrets voting to convict Bulger on any of the murder charges.

   Her regret stems from a cache of more than 70 letters Bulger wrote to her from prison, some of which describe his unwitting participation in a secret CIA experiment with LSD. In a desperate search for a mind control drug in the late 1950s, the agency dosed Bulger with the powerful hallucinogen more than 50 times when he was serving his first stretch in prison — something his lawyers never brought up in his federal trial.

   “Had I known, I would have absolutely held off on the murder charges,” Uhlar told The Associated Press in a recent interview. “He didn’t murder prior to the LSD. His brain may have been altered, so how could you say he was really guilty?” At the same time, Uhlar says she would have voted to convict Bulger on the long list of other criminal counts, meaning he still would likely have died in prison.

   Whitey Bulger’s family sues US government for $200 million.

Whitey Bulger looking at the camera: Relatives of famed mobster James “Whitey” Bulger are suing the U.S. government for $200 million for putting the 89-year-old inmate “in harm’s way.” Bulger was beaten to death in federal prison in 2018.

   Uhlar has spoken publicly about her regret before but says her belief that the gangster was wrongly convicted on the murder charges was reinforced after reading a new book by Brown University professor Stephen Kinzer: “Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control.” The book digs into the dark tale of the CIA’s former chief chemist and his attempts to develop mind control techniques by giving LSD and other drugs to unsuspecting individuals, including colleagues, and observing the effects.

   “It was encouraging to know I wasn’t losing my mind, thinking this was important,” Uhlar said. “It told me, this is huge. I mean, how many lives were affected by this? We have no idea.”

   Gottlieb’s secret program, known as MK-ULTRA, enlisted doctors and other subcontractors to administer LSD in large doses to prisoners, addicts and others unlikely to complain. In Bulger’s case, the mobster and fellow inmates were offered reduced time for their participation and told they would be taking part in medical research into a cure for schizophrenia.

   “Appealed to our sense of doing something worthwhile for society,” Bulger wrote in a letter to Uhlar reviewed by the AP.

   But nothing could have been further from the truth.

   “The CIA mind control program known as MK-ULTRA involved the most extreme experiments on human beings ever conducted by any agency of the U.S. government,” Kinzer said. “During its peak in the 1950s, that program and it’s director, Sidney Gottlieb, left behind a trail of broken bodies and shattered minds across three continents.”

SAN FRANCISCO - NOVEMBER 16: Boston gangster James 'Whitey' Bulger, Jr. poses for a mugshot on his arrival at the Federal Penitentiary at Alcatraz on November 16, 1959 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Donaldson Collection/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)© Getty
   After Bulger was found guilty by Uhlar and the other jurors, a federal judge sentenced him to two life terms plus five years. But his life behind bars ended a little more than a year ago, at age 89, when he was beaten to death by fellow inmates shortly after arriving in his wheelchair at the Hazelton federal prison in Bruceton Mills, West Virginia. No criminal charges have been filed.

   Although much had been written about the CIA’s mind control experiments before Bulger’s trial, Uhlar said she knew nothing about them until she began corresponding with the renowned gangster following his conviction.

   Uhlar started writing Bulger, she said, because she was troubled by the fact that much of the evidence against him came through testimony by former criminal associates who were also killers and had received reduced sentences in exchange for testifying against their former partner in crime.

   “When I left the trial, I had more questions,” she said.

   After Bulger started returning her letters, Uhlar noticed he often dated them with the time he had started writing in his tight cursive style. “He always seemed to be writing at one, two, or three in the morning and when I asked him why, he said it was because of the hallucinations,” Uhlar said.

   When Uhlar asked him to explain, Bulger revealed what he had already told many others: that since taking part in the LSD experiments at a federal prison in Atlanta, he’d been plagued by nightmares and gruesome hallucinations and was unable to sleep for more than a few hours at a time.

   “Sleep was full of violent nightmares and wake up every hour or so — still that way — since ’57,” he wrote.

   “On the Rock at times felt sure going insane,” he wrote in another letter, referring to the infamous former prison on Alcatraz Island, in San Francisco Bay, where he was transferred from Atlanta. “Auditory & visual hallucinations and violent nightmares — still have them — always slept with lights on helps when I wake up about every hour from nightmares.”

   The mobster also recalled the supervising physician, the late Carl Pfeiffer of Emory University, and the technicians who would monitor his response to the LSD, asking him questions such as, “Would you ever kill anyone? Etc., etc.”

   That questions struck a nerve with Uhlar. After hearing from Bulger about MK-ULTRA, “as if I should have known about it,” she visited him at a Florida federal prison on three occasions to discuss the experiments and started reading everything she could find about them.

   At one point, she reviewed the 1977 hearings by the U.S. Senate Committee on Intelligence, which was looking into MK-ULTRA following the first public disclosures of the top-secret program.

   The hearings included testimony from CIA director Stansfield Turner, who acknowledged evidence showing that the agency had been searching for a drug that could prepare someone for “debilitating an individual or even killing another person.”

   “That’s just horrifying, in my opinion,” Uhlar said. “It opens up the question of whether he was responsible for the murders he committed.”

   According to at least two of the several books written about Bulger and his life of crime, associates including corrupt former FBI agent John Morris said they assumed Bulger would use the LSD experiments to mount an insanity defense, if he were ever caught and tried.

   But in 2013 Bulger’s Boston attorneys, J.W. Carney Jr. and Hank Brennan, unveiled a novel defense in which they admitted Bulger was a criminal who made “millions and millions of dollars” from his gangland enterprise, but was enabled by corrupt law enforcement officers, especially those in Boston office of the FBI.

   Neither Carney nor Brennan would comment on their decision — attorney client privilege outlasts a client’s death. But Anthony Cardinale, a Boston attorney who has represented numerous organized crime defendants, said he would have opted for an insanity defense, in part because of the abundant evidence against Bulger.

   “I would have had him come into court like Harvey Weinstein, all disheveled, and in a wheelchair,” he said.

   Still, Cardinale acknowledged there would have been challenges to presenting an insanity defense, including the fact that Bulger spent 16 years out-witting several law enforcement agencies, before he was captured in 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., where he’d been living quietly with his longtime girlfriend while on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List.

   “The problem is, he lived for a very long time on the lam in a very secretive and a very smart way,” Cardinale said. “But that doesn’t diminish the notion that, based on the LSD experiments, and the doses he was experiencing, he could have convinced himself of things that were not true, including that he had immunity from prosecution and could do whatever he wanted.”

   To his dying day, Bulger insisted he’d received criminal immunity from a deceased federal prosecutor who once headed the New England Organized Crime Strike Force.

   John Bradley, a former Massachusetts federal prosecutor and assistant district attorney, agreed that defense lawyers would have faced high hurdles waging an insanity defense, noting that most end in convictions.

   “The flip side is that jurors are sometimes swayed by morality more than legality,” he said. “The whole shtick that the government played a role in creating this monster, uses him as an informant and then goes after him — that’s an argument that could affect one or two jurors.”

   And it only takes one to vote not guilty on all the criminal charges to produce a hung jury, Bradley noted, forcing prosecutors to decide whether to retry a case.

   Given Bulger’s decades as a crime boss who corrupted the Boston office of the FBI, paying cash and doing favors in exchange for information that helped him thwart multiple investigations, a retrial would have been a near certainty. Nevertheless, Cardinale said, a hung jury in the Bulger case “would have been a monster victory” for the defense.

   Even if Bulger were convicted on the other criminal charges and received a sentence that would have kept him behind bars for life, a refusal to find him guilty on the murder charges would have meant anguish for family members of his victims.

   “As in any case involving a tragic murder, a conviction of the perpetrator helps family member obtain closure and move on with their lives,” said Paul V. Kelly, a former federal prosecutor who has represented the family of one of Bulger’s murder victims. “An acquittal of Whitey Bulger on the murder charges would have just caused additional pain and anguish.”

   Uhlar has written about the Bulger trial in “The Truth be Damned,” a fictionalized account she published in 2018 and advertises on her website. She also gives occasional talks on the trial at community centers and libraries.

   During her correspondence and visits with Bulger, Uhlar said, she grew fond of the gangster, though he often warned her that he was a criminal and “master manipulator.” When asked if Bulger might have manipulated her, she said, “I’ve asked myself that many times. I’ll finish reading a letter and say, ‘Could he have?’ “

   Bulger often wrote to Uhlar as if she were a friend, even joking with her. But in one letter he also enclosed a more menacing message inscribed to her on the back of a photo taken of him on “the Rock,” at a time when he was fending off LSD-induced nightmares while contemplating his return to Boston’s violent criminal underworld.

   “At end of Alcatraz, getting more serious and capable of about anything,” he wrote. “Hard time makes hard people.”

 

 http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/whitey-bulger-juror-regrets-conviction-after-receiving-dozens-of-letters-from-crime-boss/ar-BB107Cpd?li=AAggFp5&ocid=iehp
J
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

J
The woman sounds deranged, and how did he get the juries personal information?
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

El Guero
Whitey has his own special wing in Hell and that's right where he belongs.  And I see absolutely no reason to take the word of this psycopath that he was actually experimented on as part of the MK Ultra program.  I have seen no proof of it(of course it wouldn't exist even if her were but...)  Has anyone seen it? His notebooks seemed pretty convenient to me.  Im gonna guess they found like 4 journals all of which cried about LSD so he could attempt to use it in trial.

Furthermore I thought it was pretty awesome how the BOP completley 100% made an absolutely innocent mistake by overlooking Bulger's inmate classification.  I bet the people responsible were about as distraught by it as the families of his victims were.  

He had embarrassed far too many very high level people within the DOJ and they had their vengeance.  Mistakes of this nature don't happen.  The warden in WV knew this guy was coming there and made sure a lot of thought went into where he was going to be sent.  I bet he absulutely trmebled in his wheelchair when he heard he was being sent to Hazelton!
CRUSH YOUR ENEMIES!  GRIND THEIR BONES INTO DIRT!  MAKE THEM REGRET THEY WERE EVER BORN!
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Parro
LSD won't make you a murderer.  In fact in puts you down, where you can question everything including yourself.  

Doc Ellis supposedly threw the first 'no-hitter' on acid.  He thought the home plate umpire was Richard Nixon and when he thought the ball came towards him on the pitcher's mound, he dove to the ground, but actually the ball wasn't coming toward him.

Still, remarkable, a no-hitter, of course Doc Ellis has done  a lot of stupid shit during his baseball tenure.  

Acid strips the ego.  It is one of the most resistant narcotics in a certain time, in other words, you build a quick resistance to it and can keep from losing control.  Witness the Grateful Dead.  Whitey Bulgar?  Give me a break please.

The only tripper I've heard of that's gone nuts is Charles Manson.  Read Helier Skelter and try to get into the head of this psychopath
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
This post was updated on .
Yes Parro, ego stripping IS one of the pre-dominant side effects of LSD. BIll Wilson, founder of Alcoholics Anonymous became an advocate for it’s use among AA members, after an encounter with Aldous Huxley and dropping with him, he found that it relieves one of the bondage of ego and thus MAY enlighten one with a spiritual experience. However, the circumstances that Whitey was given the drug would not be suitable for such an experiment. I have read about his being given the drug from many sources and believe it to be true without a doubt. This does not detract from whitey’s criminal psychopathic life, the two are not unconnected in my opinion. He was a psycho and an ego driven crook before he ever landed on the rock
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
In reply to this post by canadiana
Great article, Canadiana, Interesting timing as I am currently watching a history channel doc called America’s war on drugs which delves deep into the CIA involvement with LSD experiments and smuggling drugs around the globe to fund black ops. Very interesting program.

Thank you for this update on ‘whitey’. Also, I do not believe for a second that the FBI did not know his exact whereabouts during his time on the lam. It was clearly in their interest to keep him off the stand where he could divulge the extent of his relationship with the FBI, which went far beyond his and his brother William Bulger’s (former president of the Massachusetts state senate) friendship with FBI agent John Connolly
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

canadiana
Administrator
That's an insightful comment Frank that last paragraph where you don't believe they didn't know where he was on the lam all that time (wasn't it 16 o r 17 years I think?)because they wanted to keep him off the stand where the state shenanigans might be exposed.After that he was conveniently 'disposed of.'
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

El Guero
In reply to this post by Frank
Frank...Could you expand upon the sources attesting to Whitey's involvement in MK Ultra?  I have read it probably in 100 places but haven't seen anything close to what I would call a source.

It seems like all the sources I see are a bunch of articles using one another as references with nothing leading back to anything of true substance.  I understand that proof would be hard to come by on this but I also place little merit into the word of one of historys greatest sociopaths as the single source.

USP Atlants is a massive facility.  Just because Bulger was there doesnt mean he was actually in the program.  

Id love to hear your rationale for believing it as his involvement is certainly possible but I cant take his word for it and find myself somewhat confused as to why the media has just taken his words as fact.
CRUSH YOUR ENEMIES!  GRIND THEIR BONES INTO DIRT!  MAKE THEM REGRET THEY WERE EVER BORN!
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
In reply to this post by canadiana
Thanks Canadiana, and yeah, it was upwards of two decades that was Bulger was ‘unaccounted for’. A lot of this time was spent in California, where’d you’d think the justice department would be able to track him down. That shows a lack of fear of being caught on his part, staying in country.

Then there’s the Canadian Gangster from Van who is still wanted and was recently in California with valid drivers licences in false names. Maybe it’s an easy place to blend in for white guys with money, regardless of fugitive status. There’s only a 100,000bounty on (blank) though. He’s been wanted for 9 or 10 years if not longer. Go long!
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
In reply to this post by El Guero
Hey Guero, the info regarding his participation is from a couple of docs that I watched on the man. I have also read volumes about him and his Winter Hill gang. Early release from Alcatraz, as a quid pro quo for participating in the acid trials was the specific evidence that I based my statement on. It was there that the trials took place is my recollection, but I haven’t even had my second cup of coffee yet, so my brain is still warming up. I have seen documentaries that discussed the topic, I will find the names of these and any other sources I can. I know it’s out there, but I can see your point about sources being slim. Busy day, but I’ll post an update as soon as I can. One
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
This post was updated on .
 Note: here is an article to augment Canadiana’s fine contribution, specifying the who’s and the what’s and so forth with respect to Bulger’s acid dosing

I take exception to one comment in the article which states’the CIA bought the entire world’s supply of LSD’  how would they know?... except for the fact that they may have procured the entire original batch synthesized by Albert Hoffman, the chemist who created the drug... before the brotherhood of the eternal sunshine manufactured orange sunshine and flooded the US with this extremely potent LSD.

ARTICLE BEGINS:

During the early period of the Cold War, the CIA became convinced that communists had discovered a drug or technique that would allow them to control human minds. In response, the CIA began its own secret program, called MK-ULTRA, to search for a mind control drug that could be weaponized against enemies.

MK-ULTRA, which operated from the 1950s until the early '60s, was created and run by a chemist named Sidney Gottlieb. Journalist Stephen Kinzer, who spent several years investigating the program, calls the operation the "most sustained search in history for techniques of mind control."

Some of Gottlieb's experiments were covertly funded at universities and research centers, Kinzer says, while others were conducted in American prisons and in detention centers in Japan, Germany and the Philippines. Many of his unwitting subjects endured psychological torture ranging from electroshock to high doses of LSD, according to Kinzer's research.

"Gottlieb wanted to create a way to seize control of people's minds, and he realized it was a two-part process," Kinzer says. "First, you had to blast away the existing mind. Second, you had to find a way to insert a new mind into that resulting void. We didn't get too far on number two, but he did a lot of work on number one."

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Kinzer notes that the top-secret nature of Gottlieb's work makes it impossible to measure the human cost of his experiments. "We don't know how many people died, but a number did, and many lives were permanently destroyed," he says.

Ultimately, Gottlieb concluded that mind control was not possible. After MK-ULTRA shut down, he went on to lead a CIA program that created poisons and high-tech gadgets for spies to use.

Kinzer writes about Gottlieb and MK-ULTRA in his new book, Poisoner in Chief.

Interview highlights
 Poisoner in Chief
Poisoner in Chief
Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control
by Stephen Kinzer

Hardcover, 354 pages purchase


On how the CIA brought LSD to America

As part of the search for drugs that would allow people to control the human mind, CIA scientists became aware of the existence of LSD, and this became an obsession for the early directors of MK-ULTRA. Actually, the MK-ULTRA director, Sidney Gottlieb, can now be seen as the man who brought LSD to America. He was the unwitting godfather of the entire LSD counterculture.

In the early 1950s, he arranged for the CIA to pay $240,000 to buy the world's entire supply of LSD. He brought this to the United States, and he began spreading it around to hospitals, clinics, prisons and other institutions, asking them, through bogus foundations, to carry out research projects and find out what LSD was, how people reacted to it and how it might be able to be used as a tool for mind control.

Now, the people who volunteered for these experiments and began taking LSD, in many cases, found it very pleasurable. They told their friends about it. Who were those people? Ken Kesey, the author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, got his LSD in an experiment sponsored by the CIA by MK-ULTRA, by Sidney Gottlieb. So did Robert Hunter, the lyricist for the Grateful Dead, which went on to become a great purveyor of LSD culture. Allen Ginsberg, the poet who preached the value of the great personal adventure of using LSD, got his first LSD from Sidney Gottlieb. Although, of course, he never knew that name.

So the CIA brought LSD to America unwittingly, and actually it's a tremendous irony that the drug that the CIA hoped would be its key to controlling humanity actually wound up fueling a generational rebellion that was dedicated to destroying everything that the CIA held dear and defended.

On how MK-ULTRA experimented on prisoners, including crime boss Whitey Bulger

Whitey Bulger was one of the prisoners who volunteered for what he was told was an experiment aimed at finding a cure for schizophrenia. As part of this experiment, he was given LSD every day for more than a year. He later realized that this had nothing to do with schizophrenia and he was a guinea pig in a government experiment aimed at seeing what people's long-term reactions to LSD was. Essentially, could we make a person lose his mind by feeding him LSD every day over such a long period?

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Bulger wrote afterward about his experiences, which he described as quite horrific. He thought he was going insane. He wrote, "I was in prison for committing a crime, but they committed a greater crime on me." And towards the end of his life, Bulger came to realize the truth of what had happened to him, and he actually told his friends that he was going to find that doctor in Atlanta who was the head of that experiment program in the penitentiary and go kill him.

On the CIA hiring Nazi doctors and Japanese torturers to learn methods

The CIA mind control project, MK-ULTRA, was essentially a continuation of work that began in Japanese and Nazi concentration camps.
Stephen Kinzer, author of 'Poisoner in Chief'
The CIA mind control project, MK-ULTRA, was essentially a continuation of work that began in Japanese and Nazi concentration camps. Not only was it roughly based on those experiments, but the CIA actually hired the vivisectionists and the torturers who had worked in Japan and in Nazi concentration camps to come and explain what they had found out so that we could build on their research.

For example, Nazi doctors had conducted extensive experiments with mescaline at the Dachau concentration camp, and the CIA was very interested in figuring out whether mescaline could be the key to mind control that was one of their big avenues of investigation. So they hired the Nazi doctors who had been involved in that project to advise them.

Another thing the Nazis provided was information about poison gases like sarin, which is still being used. Nazi doctors came to America to Fort Detrick in Maryland, which was the center of this project, to lecture to CIA officers to tell them how long it took for people to die from sarin.

On the more extreme experiments Gottlieb conducted overseas

Gottlieb and the CIA established secret detention centers throughout Europe and East Asia, particularly in Japan, Germany and the Philippines, which were largely under American control in the period of the early '50s, and therefore Gottlieb didn't have to worry about any legal entanglements in these places. ...

CIA officers in Europe and Asia were capturing enemy agents and others who they felt might be suspected persons or were otherwise what they called "expendable." They would grab these people and throw them into cells and then test all kinds of, not just drug potions, but other techniques, like electroshock, extremes of temperature, sensory isolation — all the meantime bombarding them with questions, trying to see if they could break down resistance and find a way to destroy the human ego. So these were projects designed not only to understand the human mind but to figure out how to destroy it. And that made Gottlieb, although in some ways a very compassionate person, certainly the most prolific torturer of his generation.

On how these experiments were unsupervised

This guy [Sidney Gottlieb] had a license to kill. He was allowed to requisition human subjects across the United States and around the world and subject them to any kind of abuse that he wanted, even up to the level of it being fatal — yet nobody looked over his shoulder.
Stephen Kinzer
[Gottlieb] operated almost completely without supervision. He had sort of a checkoff from his titular boss and from his real boss, Richard Helms, and from the CIA director, Allen Dulles. But none of them really wanted to know what he was doing. This guy had a license to kill. He was allowed to requisition human subjects across the United States and around the world and subject them to any kind of abuse that he wanted, even up to the level of it being fatal — yet nobody looked over his shoulder. He never had to file serious reports to anybody. I think the mentality must have been [that] this project is so important — mind control, if it can be mastered, is the key to global world power.

On how Gottlieb destroyed evidence about his experiments when he left the CIA

The end of Gottlieb's career came in [1973], when his patron, Richard Helms, who was then director of the CIA, was removed by [President Richard] Nixon. Once Helms was gone, it was just a matter of time until Gottlieb would be gone, and most important was that Helms was really the only person at the CIA who had an idea of what Gottlieb had been doing. So as they were both on their way out of the CIA, they agreed that they should destroy all records of MK-ULTRA. Gottlieb actually drove out to the CIA records center and ordered the archives to destroy boxes full of MK-ULTRA records. ... However, it turns out that there were some [records] found in other places; there was a depot for expense account reports that had not been destroyed, and various other pieces of paper remain. So there is enough out there to reconstruct some of what he did, but his effort to wipe away his traces by destroying all those documents in the early '70s was quite successful.


https://www.npr.org/2019/09/09/758989641/the-cias-secret-quest-for-mind-control-torture-lsd-and-a-poisoner-in-chief
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Ricky Churches
I have been taking LSD for a out 20 years. It's without a doubt the   best drug out there followed by DMT . Never have I had a bad trip or thought about kling anyone or anything. I don't know how much LSD was back then but today it's the most expensive drug on the market. A gram of pure LSD will cost you from 10 thousand to 15 thousand dollars a gram! I'm so glad the cartels don't care for shit like this. I've heard La Barbieoved his lsd. In the next 5/10 years we are going to se a breakthrough in medicinal LSD. Microdosing is going to be the thing of the future. Steve Jobs and Apple wouldn't be what it is today if it wasn't for LSD.
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

canadiana
Administrator
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Frank
That definitely added to the article,your article Frank on the CIA's Dr. Gottilieb and the history behind it!Thanks for sharing that!
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
You’re most welcome, Canadiana. It really is a fascinating subject. A series I’ve been watching on the history channel called ‘America’s War On Drugs’ had an ep. partially dedicated to this topic. Coincidentally, I was watching that same episode while posting the article. Surprisingly comprehensive in terms of the CIA’s involvement in the drug trade as a means to fund black ops. Carpe Diem!
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Re: Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger and CIA's LSD experiment on him among corrupt FBI agents

Frank
In reply to this post by Ricky Churches
Ricky, I feel you with respect to microdosing. the breakthrough I witnessed was with a friend who was suicidely depressed her entire life, until microdosing with pscilocybin. Her recipe consisted of muddling 200 mg in a tea, twice a day. After 3 weeks she no longer felt the need to take the tea and her depression, to my knowledge has abated completely. Her transformation was truly remarkable.

DISCLAIMER: people suffering from depression may have concurrent disorders that would would negate the value of consuming this drug, I do not advocate its use unless one has done their homework on the subject and are fully aware of their mental health status, and possible contradictions with other medications such as SSRI’s.  Be safe, and be well