Borderland Beat Recognized as First to Report on Allende Massacre

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Borderland Beat Recognized as First to Report on Allende Massacre

DD
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This story is really about the governments coverup of the Allende massacres, but is noteworthy here for recognizing BB as the first to report on it.

"Government Leaders Are Gravediggers for Bad News" - Sergio Aguayo


The terrified and defenseless population kept silent. The government of Coahuila, according to then Attorney General Jesús Torres Charles, made ​​"very serious preliminary investigations" that it delivered to the PGR [Attorney General's Office] of Marisela Morales who, for those dates, had already compiled the names of disappeared persons received by state prosecutors (by the end of 2012, the list exceeded 26,000 persons).

On this secret list--leaked to the press in the last days of the Calderón administration--no disappeared persons from Allende in 2011 appear. Perhaps they hid the information that Felipe Calderón received in that year because he was already wandering through the labyrinth of denial; he said that he had not declared war on drug trafficking and remained silent on the humanitarian tragedy.

Little by little the outline of the massacre became known. On March 26, 2011, the story appeared in Borderland Beat, but it was ignored. (DD; He could have referred to all the coverage we have given it since then).  In November of 2012, current Governor Rubén Moreira spoke publicly of the

    "destruction of more than 40 houses" and that "a great many people have disappeared and are feared dead."

A month later, Juan Alberto Cedillo published the first of a series of reports in Proceso, and in 2014 more articles have appeared: a good chronicle by Diego Enrique Osorno and different texts in El Siglo de Torreón [Coahuila], La Jornada and El País [premier Spanish newspaper], among others.

We lack details, but the populace remains secretive, because it knows that it is still at the mercy of the murderers. Their defenselessness is absolute, because even the bureaucracies paid to serve them pretend not to notice. On the web page of the Commission for Human Rights of the State of Coahuila (presided over by Xavier Díez de Urdanivia), nothing is said about the disappeared. The organization Forces United for Our Disappeared in Coahuila (FUUNDEC) says that the Commission is "irrelevant," "passive" and devoid of "results."

The National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) cut and run, as usual. Its head, Raúl Plascencia, was in Coahuila in June of 2013 at a forum on the topic. He came out with a string of splendid phrases ("Mexico no longer tolerates a single disappearance"), but made ​​no reference to the disappeared from Allende or from Coahuila. It wasn't until May 2014 when the CNDH finally responded to the Allende case. It is natural that FUUNDEC, United for Our Disappeared in Mexico (FUNDEM) and other organizations claim, among other criticisms, that they did not find in the CNDH "the response that we were hoping for."

Mexico is the country of defenselessness and impunity. The "narco-university students" who caused the slaughter are protected witnesses in the United States. Enrique Peña Nieto named Marisela Morales consul in Milán, one of the fashion capitals. Felipe Calderón does not explain why he hid information about the disappeared persons, and on June 24 he had the gall to tell Christiane Amanpour of CNN that his

    "strategy was to protect [...] and provide security for Mexican families [.. .] it was correct."

Zeta-40 ended up in jail but, according to an unconfirmed source, he is not charged with the Allende massacre. In Mexico criminals disappear, and government leaders are the gravediggers for the bad news.

The original of this story was published in Reforma. http://sergioaguayo.org/index.php/reforma/entry/los-sepultureros#page 

Translated by Jane Brudage.



http://mexicovoices.blogspot.mx/2014/07/mexico-drug-war-government-leaders-are.html
Words are powerful weapons, be careful how you use them.
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Re: Borderland Beat Recognized as First to Report on Allende Massacre

Chivis
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DD
BB followers in Allende contacted Gerardo and maybe Buggs can't recall, with the info and fotos.  BB was asked to post.   In fact after the first post others sent in info and fotos.

And people like US so close to Allende were in the thick of it.  I was returning from Monclova during the attack and was made to turn around because blockades

We on the ground were getting info via word of  mouth but little was in the news, just regional reporting but of course even that downplayed it.

I was hearing 4-500 or higher killed.  and that was at the time.

Those images sent to BB  have been republished countless times by others

 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Doc
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Re: Borderland Beat Recognized as First to Report on Allende Massacre

Doc
"How the U.S. Triggered a massacre : The inside story of a cartel’s deadly assault on a Mexican town near the Texas border — and the U.S. drug operation that sparked it." By Ginger Thompson, ProPublica June 12, 2017 https://www.propublica.org/article/allende-zetas-cartel-massacre-and-the-us-dea This story was co-published with National Geographic. http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/making-of-a-massacre-mexico/
 
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