Borderland Beat Book

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Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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This post was updated on .
Borderland Beat book

I wanted to let the Borderland community be the first to know that a book is coming out, possibly in March or April. As soon as it comes out, we will let all of you know. I will be posting some excerpts from the book, to give you an idea what it contains. Thank you for all the support and everything all you do for this community. This BB community is the most informed and knowledgeable about the Mexican drug cartels that I know.
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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Borderland Beat Book
"The Borderland Beat Project is collaboration from a group of people of different backgrounds located in the US and Mexico that gather information related to the Mexican drug cartels and presents it in English through the internet, publications and presentations. Almost all content in this book comes from the result of reporting in the Borderland Beat blog and, the personal experience and research of the author.

This represents the most extensive and comprehensive source of information between the years 2008 and 2013 covering a very wide range of topics related to the Mexican cartels and the Mexican drug war in Mexico and along the US/Mexican border.

The Mexican Drug War is an ongoing armed conflict taking place among rival drug cartels, who fight each other for regional control (plazas), and Mexican government forces, which seek to combat drug trafficking. Although Mexican drug cartels, or Drug Trafficking Organizations (DTO’s), have existed for a few decades, they have become more powerful since the demise of Colombia's Cali and Medellín cartels in the 1990s.

The main cartels included are the powerful Sinaloa Cartel or Cartel de Sinaloa (CDS) that dominated the Golden Triangle in the states of Chihuahua, Sinaloa and Durango - The Beltran Leyva Organization (BLO) made up of the Beltran brothers mainly concentrating in Guerrero - The Juarez Cartel fighting to protect their turf from the Sinaloa Cartel on one of the deadliest border city in Mexico - The Gulf Cartel fighting their own break away armed wing known as Los Zetas on the gulf coast that turned towns in the state of Tamaulipas in to ghost towns - La Familia Michoacana (LFM) trying to make a presence in the lands of Tierra Caliente of Michoacan and eventually morphing in to the Caballeros Templarios or The Knights Templar.

The information on this book has a fast pace, with a lot of DTO information thrown at you at one time filled with sicario activity and the Mexican government attempt to intervene, but it also contains a lot of personal direct behind the scene information from the author. This particular information is the involvement of the author from his early stages when he started to formalize his plan to bring to life the Borderland Beat Project.

Follow Buggs as he sets the stage and takes you on a wild ride in to the dark shadows of the violence and chaos of the Mexican drug cartels. A narrative, as told in the deep dark pages of the Borderland Beat blog."
Borderland Beat
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buggs
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Dos Chapos

**** Caution, graphic violent content, discretion advised ****

Excerpt from Bordeland Beat - Chapter "The Execution of two Chapos."

"When both men are finished talking, it’s time to pay the piper. Both men then appeared frozen in time, staring in to the distance, as if in a trance, living but already dead. Perhaps they were heavily drugged so they didn't kick and scream during the brutal nightmare. Fear itself will not numb anyone enough to face this level of evil directly in the eye. Even the sound of the chainsaw does not break their trance.

The uncle is first; he grimaces as the chainsaw spews blood, flesh and bone, as it tears through his throat, separating his head from his body. The chainsaw accidentally cuts the arm of the nephew sitting right next to the uncle during the violent massacre, but he doesn’t flinch.

The second man, the young nephew, is decapitated with a knife, and while the knife is cutting through his throat, he makes a last attempt to scream out, but his vocal chords have been severed, and all one can hear is a faint whimpering sound, the last breath of a man that was way too young to die.

The ghastly chilling gurgling sounds coming out of his perforated wind pipe, followed by the grinding sounds as the knife breaks through the spinal cord, finally frees his head from his body, ending the most repulsive, heinous and gruesome act witness on video.

In a normal world one would say, wake up it’s only a nightmare, but this is real, repeating itself every day somewhere in old Mexico."
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

ENDTHEWAR
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Will be first in line to grab a copy. Ever since I took an interest in the drug war this site has been my number go to for information on it. I can't thank you all enough.
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buggs
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Thank you for your support

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019, 12:10 AM ENDTHEWAR [via Borderland Beat Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Will be first in line to grab a copy. Ever since I took an interest in the drug war this site has been my number go to for information on it. I can't thank you all enough.


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Borderland-Beat-Book-tp4105971p4105981.html
To unsubscribe from Borderland Beat Book, click here.
NAML
Borderland Beat
MX
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MX
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Hello, buggs. Great news! I look forward to getting the book once its out.

Question: Will the book provide an in-depth coverage of the Gulf Cartel? I joined the forum because I was particularly interested in the "Current Events in the Gulf Cartel", which contains a lot of information not available anywhere else on the web. The information in this topic could probably be a book in itself (an idea for another day!), but I was just wondering. Thanks.
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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It will cover activities from 2009 through 2013, the active years, the fall of Tony Tormenta

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019, 10:16 AM MX [via Borderland Beat Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello, buggs. Great news! I look forward to getting the book once its out.

Question: Will the book provide an in-depth coverage of the Gulf Cartel? I joined the forum because I was particularly interested in the "Current Events in the Gulf Cartel", which contains a lot of information not available anywhere else on the web. The information in this topic online could probably be a book in itself (an idea for another day!), but I was just wondering. Thanks.


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Borderland-Beat-Book-tp4105971p4105990.html
To unsubscribe from Borderland Beat Book, click here.
NAML
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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Excerpts from Borderland Beat - Chapter - The House of Death

"A Mexican attorney by the name of Fernando Reyes was looking for a way to cross a load of weed across the border. Lalo can make it happen for him, he knows all the contacts. Lalo has brought Fernando to this little house in the city of Juarez. Fernando doesn't know it yet but he has walked in to a trap. Hiding in one of the rooms of the house are also two police officers from the state police of Chihuahua.

Fernando is unaware, but they are here to kill him.

As Fernando is talking to Lalo, one of the police officers comes out of one of the rooms and puts the barrel of a gun to his face. Fernando pleads for his life, he knows he is in trouble. They decide not using the gun, it’s too loud, they can't take any chances.

This house is located in a middle-class neighborhood and people will call the police here if they hear gunshots. Fernando screams in panic. They tape his mouth shut in attempts to stifle the loud screams. Fernando fights back, kicking and swinging his arm, so they take him down to the floor. But it's not easy, Fernando is fighting for his life. Lalo helps to restrain Fernando while one of the officers wraps an extension chords around the neck of Fernando. Fernando knows his death is certain but continues to fight. He does not want to die like this, but is futile, he finally lays motionless as his life is snuffed from him.

The officers split $2,000 for killing a suspected drug trafficker known as “Fernando.”

Fernando is dead and they have his dope. Santillan (a top lieutenant in the powerful Juarez cartel organization) congratulates Lalo, he tells him that Vicente Carrillo Fuentes will be happy."
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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From Borderland Beat - Chapter - The Encounter with the Drunk Sicarios

We continued to ride, it was starting to get late and we were not sure how far we were from Urique. As we came around a bend and started to climb a hill, I could see a large white truck coming down the hill. I could see several Indian men on the back of the truck. There was a narrow gap between some trees just enough for the truck to fit. Everest managed to cross the gap before the truck made it through. He sped up the hill and I had to wait for the truck to make it through the gap so I could get through.

But the truck stopped in the middle of the gap blocking my path.

I could see two men inside the cab of the truck. Suddenly the driver got out and I could see he was wearing a military jacket with blue pants. He was carrying an assault rifle, AR-15.

I did not like this a bit. I knew this was extremely dangerous. We were deep in the vast empty mountains and the whole scene was not right. I started to look around me, looking for options.

I tried to back up to turn around fast, but he was moving too fast toward me. I then saw that the passenger had also exited his truck and he also was armed with an assault rifle. I became afraid of what they might do and for a second, I thought of ditching my bike and running as fast as I could, but I knew I didn't have time to do anything.

I could see that Everest was reaching the top of the hill kicking dust in the distance.

I thought to myself, "stop, don't panic, think." I focused my attention on the two men quickly approaching me, trying to see signs or red flags. The driver had his trigger finger extended on his weapon while the passenger had his finger resting on the trigger of his weapon. As the driver got closer, I could see the hat he was wearing said "Urique police." Out here that did not mean shit. Most municipal police are actively colluding with organize crime.

I could very easily be killed here on the spot and my body not found for days. And it will not matter, I would be just another casualty of many.
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

NarcoBlondie
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I'm excited to read this. I'll post it on my twitter @narcoreporter for ya.
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buggs
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Thank you for your support!

On Thu, Feb 21, 2019, 8:17 PM NarcoBlondie [via Borderland Beat Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm excited to read this. I'll post it on my twitter @narcoreporter for ya.


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
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NAML
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

J. Stewart
And today the postman delivered the book, straight from your branch in Europe!



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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
Administrator
Great!!! Tell us how you like it, if you learned something new, etc, ,  

On Mon, May 6, 2019, 12:58 PM J. Stewart [via Borderland Beat Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:
And today the postman delivered the book, straight from your branch in Europe!






If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://borderland-beat-forum.924382.n3.nabble.com/Borderland-Beat-Book-tp4105971p4106747.html
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NAML
Borderland Beat
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

Parro
Great read thus far!  30% through so far, and am learning something new on each page based on the time period.  Starting off with Dos Mil . . . . do not flirt with his girlfriend . .
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

buggs
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This post was updated on .
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On May 9, I had the honor and privilege to present at the International Latino Gang Investigators Association Symposium in Ontario California. This picture attached is myself with Steve Duncan who is President of the ILGIA and a retired agent of the DEA. He is a very nice guy, has a lot of knowledge of the Mexican cartels (specially in the Tijuana region) and is a huge loyal follower of BB. This was the first time a collaborator of BB presented publicly to a large group of law enforcement personnel and I did it without having to use my  pseudonym name of  “Buggs.” I represented myself as I am, told everything, because that is how it is in the book, at a wide audience level.

I was surprised how popular BB is with law enforcement. People where very excited to see me and told me how they appreciate everything that the community of BB does to provide vital information of the cartel activities in Mexico. I really got a sense of the impact that BB has and the reach that is capable of. I have never felt more proud to represent BB like I did when I attended this seminar and interaction with all the people. Many people were asking me about the book, I only took 30 of them and I felt bad that I did not take more.

I just wanted to tell you all, the contributors and everyone that interacts in the forum how valuable your contribution of vital information is. It is truly appreciated.

A lot of them wanted me to extend this message to everyone in the BB community!

Thank you!
Borderland Beat
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Parro
Read the post and the book! if you want to contribute to this page with knowledge, you can't do this without Bugg's book.  Congratulations Buggs, I'm impressed!

Please post again, if they think it's me, a lot of folks won't read further, they should go further if they care . .
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

Chivis
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I knew you would be a better fit for Steve's training sessions than me, with your 30 years law enforcement.   Getting together two of my fave guys is awesome.

From Steve to me:

Alex did great and fit right in with my dorky cop friends.

I am not surprised how many agents, police etc follow Borderland Book.  Dozens over the years have reached out to me and we have exchange information over the years, DEA, Homeland Security, ICE . etc.
plus attorneys and Federal prosecutors  

Agent Steve is my absolute favorite.  He is what you hope agents are made of, determined, honest, caring, selfless.  

here is one of the pics Steve sent me, he calls this "Buggs in action"



 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Borderland Beat Book

Chivis
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I sent Doc Bunker, of Small Wars Journal, my interview with buggs, and he said he would write a review and order the book.  True to his word he did both.  Below is an excerpt, below at bottom is a link to the complete review

Small Wars Journal
SWJ EL CENTRO BOOK REVIEW - BORDERLAND BEAT: REPORTING ON THE MEXICAN CARTEL DRUG WAR
El Centro

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SWJ El Centro Book Review - Borderland Beat: Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War



Robert J. Bunker


Borderland Beat: Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

Alejandro (Alex) Marentes

Morrisville, NC: Lulu, April 2019

232 Pages

$19.04 Paperback; $6.99 eBook


 

The work Borderland Beat: Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War represents the first book (& ebook) to be published by this blog site. Borderland Beat is an informational and collaborative English language blog (drawing upon US and Mexican contributors) reporting on the Mexican narco wars. The blog is a contemporary raw feed of unassessed information. The Borderland Beat blog focuses on non-professional (volunteer) Spanish to English translations with less journalistic interpretation and/or detailed analysis linked to the contributions. The work joins in the same ‘digital blog/online journal to book’ publishing trend as seen with SWJ—El Centro (since 2012) and Blog del Narco (in 2013).

 

The book is written (compiled) by Alex Marentes—a former active duty and reserve Marine and a thirty-year Albuquerque Police Department officer (retired)—who was born in Ciudad Juárez and lived there for the first ten years of his life. To his fans at the Borderland Beat blog, which he founded and owns, he is known by the pseudonym “Buggs” (in reference to Buggs Bunny the Looney Tunes character). The author was recently interviewed at Borderland Beat by the female blogger Chivis concerning the work, his past experiences, and motivations to initially create the blog.

 

The Borderland Beat book focuses on more organized narco violence taking place in Mexico during the 2008 through 2013 era before the later cartel fragmentation due to kingpin targeting—when Alex Marentes was more directly involved with the blog. It draws its material via the site’s blog posts and the author’s professional (rather than academic) directed research. The book cover is Mexican skull art based with elements of violence—bullet rounds, revolvers, barbed wire, pills, fire, and brass knuckles—combined together to create a narcocultura inspired skull. The work is 232 pages long and devoid of page numbers.  It provides no references, citations, or notes, other than one or two URLs, but is supported by the author’s website which has some sources and videos. The work contains numerous images of drug war violence (not sourced) and is divided into the following listing of impressionistic and interpretive themes (with somewhat more structure evident at the end of the work related to specific cartels and timelines).


https://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/swj-el-centro-book-review-borderland-beat-reporting-mexican-cartel-drug-war
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please