Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

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Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
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A friend of mine highly educated with a PHD who travels road trips with me sometimes to Mexico says totally anarchy has to set into Mexico before anything changes.Like people starving on a mass scale because no one can do business because of extortions,etc.He thinks when that happens there will be a coup of some kind and it will be an outside force like communism like what happened to Cuba in the 50's when people were starving.He thinks that it could be the UN stepping in with a cashless society which would shut down all illegal business like drugs,extortions,piracy,gambling,human smuggling,prostitution and all proceeds from those would be confiscated.Interesting!I really think it would shut them down.He thinks Mexico has got worse but not total anarchy YET.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

deelucky1
cuba is  a bad example of what could happen to México .cuba over the years made a breed  of lazy non working people .México is the oppisite .do you know  the cash flow that is sent from hardworking citizens that live in the U.S back to their familias in México ?extortion is last resort  for criminals  hiting rockbottom .attracts attention heats up plazas shines light on oficials. then you get picked up by the marina..  where in cuba that is luxury.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
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O really-extortions the end of the line?Then why is it increasing in Mexico and hasn't stopped in CA?Looks like it could be a very profitable biz without the risk of smuggling.Just think if you could get 15% of every business in town and get away with it you could make more than running your own profitable business and it must be worth fighting over that territory because they do but maybe this goes with the splintering but soon there would be no economy left.Look what happened with Juarez.They were shutting businesses everywhere.Cartels don't care if they bleed them dry and shut down.It's about right now and besides they're portable which means they can hit another town in the state that doesn't have any so-called presence of gangs.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

deelucky1
one thing to say to you about the  U.S and  C.A



WORLD TRADE MARKET
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

deelucky1
This post was updated on .
Your hyping up extortions when you dont see the  big picture. thats like saying lets figure out if this girl is really chapos Daughter .plus cuba give states full control of  decisions you have 100 countries within cuba evrybody is in power even the library Guy.and the  U.N isnt like the the U.S last i heard heard north korea hasnt listed its yearly NET  in years they only trade with china like %80 percent goes to their milatary U.S should buy a mirror but im pretty sure winning elections makes evrybody happy !
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

Cuidado
In reply to this post by canadiana
I dont see that happening imo.  Syria is still using currency and the country is all but destroyed.  
Mexico has the 15th largest economy in the world.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
Administrator
In Syria they have currency because the gov [Asaad] is still in power and yes you are right Mexico probably is the 15th biggest economy in the world probably even more than my own country but it certainly doesn't benefit it's own citizens.Take a look at Venezuela 2nd largest oil producing country in world[yes I know oil is down but even when it wasn't] with a population of not much more than 20 million and people are starving.It just really sucks!Mexico does have a really diverse country even more than Canada and the people live like shit but I think problem is not wealth so much as unequal disbursement of it.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

dcm90
Banned User
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by canadiana
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
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Never thought of that but they could follow the bitcoin or put an order in for'umbrellas' or whatever product advertised.They would eventually get a 'bingo'.The silk roads would just keep getting shut down over and over but maybe only after investigation.Internet would leave drug dealers wide open,the smaller 1's anyway.Besides some may be scams-take your bitcoin and don't deliver so maybe wouldn't be so popular among people.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

deelucky1
canadiana i think Your doing a great job debate is great for this site as long as it is respectful ! this coming from sombody who acted like a boy  when  i first posted lots of respect for la chivis and other people here .
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

Soliado
In reply to this post by canadiana
Canadiana, Venezuela is not the best country to use an example because of the manner in which their POS government spends the wealth that they earn from the sale of oil. The profits from oil in Venezuela are used to lower the cost of gasoline sold within Venezuela. Until the recent price hike, a gallon of gas was being sold for $0.15. With the precipitous drop of oil prices, the bus driver turned president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, had even less money coming in from the sale of oil to continue propping up the price of gasoline. Their economy, oil based primarily, also took in the bus driver's shorts, due to inflation and a national shortage of basic foodstuff. I mean when you can't even find toilet paper stocked on the shelves of your local super market you know your country is up shit creak. But Maduro blamed it on the stores hoarding products and began nationalizing one company after another. After his government took control of these companies that he accused of hoarding, he found out nobody was hoarding they just did not have the money to buy these items to stock their shelves because Venezuela's money is so devalued.

Take into consideration that Venezuela is very rich in oil deposits but they lack the refining capacity. If memory serves me right, they actually have to export their oil to refineries in other countries and then ship it back as gasoline. How much does that cost the Venezuelan government? I don't know but I can bet that it is a lot more than what they get for a gallon of gasoline. Chavez initiated this program to curry favor with the poor, which was the electoral base that swept him into office. In addition, Venezuela also props up Cuba by supplying this third or fourth world country with oil products and gasoline. How does Cuba pay Venezuela for every barrel of oil or gallon of gasoline that it receives? They really don't because Cuba's economy is for the birds. As a communist nation their agricultural production and manufacturing is tightly controlled by the government. They produce sugar, tobacco, seafood to some extent but they don't have a lot of products to export to the world.

The Russians kept them afloat for decades during the Cold War years primarily to antagonize the U.S. and Canada.  After Russia moved away from communism, the amount of financial support to their old friend Castro and Cuba decreased every year. Castro began courting Chavez where they found common ground, which is to blame all of the problems facing their nations on the policies of the west, particularly the U.S. Now that Venezuela's economy is in the toilet and they don't have toilet paper, where do the Castro brothers turn for economic aid? Why do you think that relations between the U.S. and Cuba have warmed up suddenly? It isn't because Cuba has so many awesome baseball players. They have a few but most of the really great ones defected for the million dollars a year they receive playing in the U.S.

Sorry about the sarcasm but these two political leaders are the biggest pendejos this side of the world.  
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by deelucky1
Thanks for the vote of confidence DLucky but I just want to say I learn so much from you people on forum and somewhat on mainboard.You guys bring up issues I never thought about before and open the mind.A lot of you guys are 'boots on the ground'  so to speak which really has a different view whereas I'm from afar.I don't debate to make things more interesting,it's just that Ive always been a very curious person more than the average Joe according to my friends.[Isn't it curiousity that killed the cat]?I love picking people's brains so keep it up.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

jlopez
In reply to this post by Soliado
Soliado: I agree with your analysis. Especially in national politics, a simplistic solution is usually a shortcut to disaster.  It happens time and again, which is why I say only half in jest that voters are the weak point in any democracy, more so in countries like Venezuela, Colombia and Mexico, which are fake democracies.

I have been following the discussion about the effect of a cashless financial system on crime since the initial description by Canadiana, but I still cannot figure out how or why a cashless society would eliminate crime. It would make certain crimes more difficult to carry out, sure, but people would figure out very quickly how to commit the crimes and still profit. There are whole classes of crime that would be totally unaffected by the fact that they are being carried out in a cashless society, but I assume from the initial description, which quoted an economist, that the crimes under consideration are profit driven criminal activities.

Even there and even now, certain crimes are cashless and tremendously profitable. One obvious example: when Russian or eastern European computer hackers loot bank or corporate accounts and take millions, even billions, not one physical penny is involved, not even a virtual bitcoin.

Every one of us has seen photos of bales of money allegedly seized from drug traffickers. But I am absolutely convinced that drug traffickers will very quickly figure out how to profit in a cashless financial system, despite the fact that the current methods depend heavily on cash. Crime is a human condition.
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Re: Any thoughts on a cashless society shutting down cartels?

canadiana
Administrator
I like your description of Mexico being 1 of the fake democracies.Well put.I think you are right about internet driven crimes increasing,that's a given and credit and debit cards but I'm thinking if there was no cash around criminals would do the same money laundering.They would have to trade something like what was done in the 1st century.Friend of mine who was a realtor and needed a truck traded her client's fee for his truck to avoid the taxes but of course she needed a truck at the time.So a big drug trafficker could trade his drugs for say a trailertruck load of avocados and sell in his grocery store or sell as a wholesaler in his produce warehouse for cashless transanctions and yes they probably would find a way.How would a 'john'pay for his prostitute?It would have to be a registered business maybe under the guise of 'health services' or something like that but would sure keep law enforcement busy busting these 'fake'places as well as the drugs themselves.