Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

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Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

canadiana
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Canadian Press  
The Latest: Mexico's AMLO claims win in presidential vote

2 hrs ago
 
MEXICO CITY - The latest on Mexico's elections (all times local):

11:30 p.m.

    Leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has claimed victory in Mexico's presidential election, calling for reconciliation after what he called a "historic day."

    Lopez Obrador vows that profound change is coming, but says individual and property rights will be guaranteed. He promises respect for the autonomy of the Bank of Mexico and says his government will maintain financial and fiscal discipline.

    He also says contracts obtained under energy reforms will be scrutinized for any corruption or illegality, but there will be no confiscation or expropriation of property.

    The candidate spoke late Sunday shortly after electoral authorities announced that a quick count forecast he had won over half the votes, a remarkable mandate not seen in the country for many years.

    President Enrique Pena Nieto said in a televised message to the nation that he had congratulated Lopez Obrador.

11:25 p.m.

    Mexican electoral authorities say a quick count from Sunday's election forecasts that leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador won over half the votes. That's a remarkable mandate not seen in the country for many years.

    Lorenzo Cordova is director of the National Electoral Institute. He said in a televised address late Sunday that Lopez Obrador's vote count was projected to be between 53 per cent and 53.8 per cent.

    That compares to 22.1 per cent to 22.8 per cent for conservative Ricardo Anaya and 15.7 per cent to 16.3 per cent for Jose Antonio Meade of the ruling Institutional Revolution Party.

a person in a room© Provided by thecanadianpress.com
    Independent candidate Jaime "El Bronco" Rodriguez was said to be getting between 5.3 per cent and 5.5 per cent.

10:05 p.m.

    U.S. President Donald Trump is sending his congratulations to Mexico's Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on his apparent victory in Sunday's presidential election.

    In a tweet about the leftist populist candidate, Trump says: "I look very much forward to working with him. There is much to be done that will benefit both the United States and Mexico!"

9:40 p.m.

    Supporters of Mexico's Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador are wildly celebrating his apparent overwhelming presidential win even before authorities release official results.

    Thousands of people are pouring into Mexico City's sprawling main square, known as the Zocalo, where the 64-year-old former mayor had called on his backers to rally Sunday night.

    Retired Susana Zuniga beamed as she said the country was experiencing a moment similar to the Mexican Revolution a century ago.

    In her words: "The people are fed up, that is what brought us to this."

    Motorists are cruising up and down the central Paseo de la Reforma honking horns to the tune of "Viva Mexico!" and waving Mexican flags from car windows and moonroofs.

8:45 p.m.

    Mexico's Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is on the cusp of winning the presidency after the second of his two main rivals conceded defeat ahead of official results.

    Conservative Ricardo Anaya is well behind the leftist Lopez Obrador in exit polling made public shortly after voting stations closed Sunday night.

    Anaya acknowledged in a televised speech that "the trend favours Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador."

    He added "I recognize his triumph."

    Governing party candidate Jose Antonio Meade earlier conceded victory to Lopez Obrador.

8:15 p.m.

    An exit poll in Mexico is giving a big edge to leftist presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in his third bid for the presidency.

    The survey by Consulta Mitofsky says Lopez Obrador has a 16 to 26 per cent lead over his nearest rival, conservative Ricardo Anaya.

    Jose Antonio Meade of the ruling Institutional Revolution was said to be in third. He conceded defeat in a televised speech.

a man talking on a stage© Provided by thecanadianpress.com
    Lopez Obrador is a twice-spurned populist whose supporters hope he will deliver on promises to clean up corruption, reign in spiraling violence and lift millions out of poverty.

    His detractors argue he would set the country back decades with an economic policy of state.

    Amid widespread frustrations with the status quo, all of the candidates have tried to paint themselves as the agent of real change.

    Lopez Obrador has enjoyed a wide lead in opinion polls since the beginning of the campaign.

6:20 p.m.

    Exit polls in Mexico are predicting clear victories for allies of leftist presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in races for four statehouses plus the capital.

    Surveys conducted by Consulta Mitofsky and Televisa forecast gubernatorial wins for allies of the Morena party in Chiapas, Morelos, Tabasco and Veracruz, and for head of government in Mexico City.

    A win for the conservative National Action Party is predicted in the central highland state of Guanajuato.

    In all, eight governorships plus the capital are up for grabs in Sunday's vote. Exit polls for the presidential race have not yet been released.

6 p.m.

    Polls are beginning to close across much of Mexico for Sunday's presidential election.

    They're scheduled to end at 6 p.m. in each of Mexico's three summer time zones, meaning the last to close will come in the northwestern state of Baja California.

    Ediane Da Costa Pereira is a Brazilian who became a naturalized citizen in Mexico and voted Sunday in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego.

    She said she backed leftist front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and called him less than ideal but the "best of the bad" options. She said a Lopez Obrador presidency is a good way to kick the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, out of power.

    But 20-year-old Jose Corrales said he supported PRI candidate Jose Antonio Meade for his "Advance With You" program, which would offer support to citizens according to their specific, individual needs.

    Lopez Obrador has had a wide advantage in most polls over Meade, conservative candidate Ricardo Anaya of a right-left coalition and independent Jaime "El Bronco" Rodriguez.

1:15 p.m.

    Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto has cast his vote in elections to choose his successor.

    Pena Nieto tells reporters at the polling station that his administration will be "absolutely respectful and support the authorities that are elected."

    Candidate Jose Antonio Meade of Pena Nieto's Institutional Revolutionary Party has been running third in most polls, behind front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the leftist Morena party and conservative Ricardo Anaya of a right-left coalition.

    Pena Nieto said Sunday that the vote "should reaffirm us in our democratic vocation."

12:30 p.m.

    The head of Mexico's electoral institute says voting across the country has been proceeding "peacefully, without major incidents." Lorenzo Cordova says only four of the 156,807 polling places failed to open.

    Front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador voted early, saying "today the people will decide between more of the same or a real change."

    Candidates Ricardo Anaya and Jose Antonio Meade both said they were expecting to be celebrating when polls close later Sunday.

8:20 a.m.

    Polls have opened in Mexico's presidential and local elections, and front-running candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is among the first to line up at his polling place in Mexico City.

    While the left-leaning candidate holds a commanding lead in polls, voters who don't like him also lined up early.

    Twenty-six-year-old Juan Carlos Limas said he's "concerned that some candidates are making proposals that are impossible, because they're very expensive to carry out." He says he's voting for Ricardo Anaya, candidate of a right-left coalition.

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/the-latest-mexicos-amlo-claims-win-in-presidential-vote/ar-AAzpXlQ?li=AAggFp5&ocid=iehp
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

Chava
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

deelucky1
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

el Jesse James
In reply to this post by canadiana
Is it really 100% true - this rumor hes offering amnesty to narcos? Aint that the opposite of what he campaigned on in his previous attempt against Calderon?
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

canadiana
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This I read this evening on news on how NAFTA with Mexico and Canada might be effected with the new presidency against the US.(there is now 2 left socialist governments).Canada wants a trilateral agreement meaning all 3 countries and US wants a bilateral meaning separate agreements between the US.I wonder what AMLO wants?
http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/nafta-future-uncertain-with-new-mexico-leader/ar-AAzthH0?ocid=iehp



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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

canadiana
Administrator
In reply to this post by el Jesse James
Chivis wrote an article on mainboard about it.From what I understand the farmer's would grow 'legal' poppies I would assume for Big Pharma maybe like Tasmania does.Correct me if I'm wrong people.Another article on mainboard last week says the price of opium paste is way down due to fentanyl so I'm wondering it has to be the same in the 'legal poppy industry' too so maybe there isn't a call so much now from Big pharma as there's so much synthetic now?Isn't hydro morphine a synthetic too and also they aren't prescribing it near what they used to.Yeah,terminal people get it but it's only temporary as they die.
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

MC EZ
In reply to this post by canadiana
I've followed AMLO's career from up here in Gringolandia for some time. After ages of PRIistas and a few PANistas, I'm excited he will get his shot. I was interested in the fact that his campaign did not seem to put the narco situation and the absence of law/the state up at the highest priority. Endemic poverty, corruption, and graft are critical to address, but it is hard to see how he can make progress on those things without solving the every day threat to the average person's security.

Does anyone on the forum have insight into what his strategy will be? Is it really as simple as negotiating with cartels and legalizing drugs in MX? Drugs aside, DTO's have expanded into so many other illegal revenue generating activities (gas theft, human trafficking, kidnapping, etc) it is hard to imagine how he intends to close Pandora's box. If anyone has articles they can post where he addresses this stuff in more detail, I'd love to check them out.

Thanks!
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Re: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Mexican Presidency

Tully
I just came across this English language translation of a Jornada interview with AMLO's incoming Special Security Advisor:

In an interview with La Jornada, Alfonso Durazo Montaño, who is commissioned by Andrés Manuel López Obrador to design the strategies for combating the insecurity, says:

"It would be irresponsible (that members of the Army and Navy no longer perform public security tasks) at this time. ...The return to the barracks will be gradual and move forward. We will face the cartels as economic entities and the Law of Seizure of Property will be revised, so that it is strengthened and its application has effective results."

Durazo Montaño considers that the ineffectiveness in combating the insecurity is the result of having concentrated this task on the Secretariat for Internal Government Affairs (SEGOB), so he anticipates that legislative reforms will be made to create, once again, a Secretariat of Public Security (SSP).

He also said that the Center of Investigation and National Security (Cisen) [coordinating body including police and military] will be eliminated because the factious use of this center has de-legitimized it. It must be replaced as soon as possible by a national coordinator of intelligence.

Durazo Montaño was born in Sonora, has a bachelor's degree, two master's degrees and a doctorate in administration and public policy. Originally a member of the PRI, he has held various positions in federal public administration and was the private secretary of Luis Donaldo Colosio, the PRI presidential candidate in 1994 who advocated for democratic reforms, but was assassinated during his campaign. Later he also served as the private secretary of the PAN President Vicente Fox during four years of his presidential term.

La Jornada: "What approach does the government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador have in terms of [domestic] security?"

Durazo Montaño:

"It is very clear that part of the ineffectiveness in combating insecurity has been the centralization of all security powers in SEGOB. The design of the SSP will be according to a vision of State that transcends the six-year presidential terms. Its structure will be compact, and for this purpose all the powers that SEGOB currently has in security matters will be reviewed. Also, the elimination of Cisen [is being considered], because unfortunately, it has been left delegitimized by all the manipulation, factional use and deviation towards activities of a political nature.

"The new body (a national intelligence coordinator) will be within the SSP. There will be no factional use of any areas in our government. About 16 agencies in the federal government manage databases that are sources of intelligence. All of those will stay in place, particularly and obviously those of the Secretariats of the Navy and Defense. But today they work in an uncoordinated manner."

La Jornada: "How are you going to attack the  the financial and operational apparatus of the drug cartels?

Durazo Montaño:

"We are going to confront drug trafficking as an economic entity and we will fight it in its main strength, which is financial, because that is what gives it the capacity to corrupt and buy official protection. This is where the role of the Financial Intelligence Unit becomes fundamental along with the seizure of assets, which has only been applied unsuccessfully in two or three cases. It is a law [and an agency] that we have to review, update and provide with greater legal resources to facilitate its implementation."

La Jornada: What will happen to the structure of the Federal Police and with the Gendarmerie?

Durazo Montaño:

"As for the Gendarmerie, we will keep it for the time being, as part of the SSP, but we will be evaluating the Federal Police and know in depth its weaknesses and apply a solution. We will fight police corruption to the letter, but at the same time provide vocational and economic incentives, via training, salaries, benefits, housing, scholarships, life insurance and medical care for all police departments.

The Federal Police need to be consolidated and strengthened, and eventually increase the size of the force. What we are going to do is optimize the use of public funds.

We will begin immediately with a program of training and professionalization (of all police [including state and municipal]) that allows us to more effectively fulfill the responsibility of security and that allows us to start gradually removing the military forces that are on the street."

La Jornada: "Is there the possibility that civilians will be made heads the armed forces?

Durazo Montaño:

"There isn't a scenario of that nature. The high commanders of the armed forces have fulfilled their responsibility and are able to fulfill it. A good part of the excesses that we attribute to the armed forces have been due to the excesses of the orders from civilians, from politicians. We always accuse the armed forces, but never the civilians who give them orders. And that's where the boundary should be.

I am of the idea of ​​returning the military to their barracks; however, it would be irresponsible to do so at this time, because there are areas of the country where the only State presence is the armed forces."

La Jornada: What will happen to the Internal Security Law?

Durazo Montaño:

"We will wait for the Supreme Court of Justice of the Nation to define and rule on the inconsistencies, excesses, abuses and possible unconstitutionalities of that law. In any case, we will not resort to any resource that enables the Executive Branch or any of its agencies to commit excesses in the exercise of the legitimate force of the State."

La Jornada: "What is going to happen with the president's security?"

Durazo Montaño:

"The decision to return the Presidential General Staff to the Secretariat of National Defense has been made. It will be necessary to see how the tasks of logistical support for civilians [president, ex-presidents] will be handled. Personally I would be inclined to have some support, even if it was minimal... The support provided by people taking care of him is impressive. ... Lopez Obrador has the last word."

La Jornada: "Don't you think this is exposing yourself? Isn't a security team necessary?"

Durazo Montaño:

"At this moment, Lopez Obrador has said what he wants. I would opt for a civilian group who act at least in logistical matters and for containment of demonstrations."

https://mexicovoices.blogspot.com/2018/07/lopez-obrador-government-on-drug-war.html

http://www.jornada.com.mx/2018/07/05/politica/006e1pol

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Today the incoming Interior Minister, former Supreme Court Judge Olga Sánchez Cordero, stated the potential amnesty would not apply to serious crimes (such as murder), but even those crimes could see a reduction in sentence for co-operation.  She stressed this proposal would need approval by the Congress.

https://www.proceso.com.mx/541734/congreso-decidira-sobre-la-amnistia-y-no-aplicara-para-delitos-graves-sanchez-cordero

I've heard statements from several AMLO people that it will focus on young people and farmers, who they feel were recruited by narcos mostly against their will.

Also, today Sánchez Cordero stated AMLO will propose a complete legalization of recreational use of marijuana, and the medical use of opium:

https://noticieros.televisa.com/ultimas-noticias/amnistia-marihuana-y-gobernabilidad-habla-olga-sanchez/

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Chava
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