Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
8 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Chivis
Administrator
EL PASO — Slightly more than a fourth of U.S. citizens who died in Mexico during an 8 1/2-year period beginning in 2003 were homicide victims.

Juarez with 96 homicides and Tijuana with 114 were the cities with the most slayings.
 
In Juarez, a city of about 1.5 million people, the number of homicides of U.S. citizens rose dramatically from three in 2003 to 37 in 2010.
 
The analysis was based on 1,904 total deaths of U.S. citizens reported to the State Department between Jan. 1, 2003, and June 30, 2011.
 
The rest of the deaths were scattered across Mexico, including the states of Chiapas, Jalisco, Quintana Roo, Zacatecas, Nayarit, Sonora, Tamaulipas and Mexico City. Accidents, drownings and suicides accounted for other deaths of U.S. citizens.
 
The total number of U.S. deaths is a fraction of the entire U.S. population in Mexico that appears to live unaffected by the violence that's ravaged some of the border cities.
 
“A million American citizens live in Mexico and approximately 10 million Americans visit Mexico every year,” according to State Department officials.
 
Many expatriates live in enclaves with large U.S. populations such as San Miguel Allende, Guadalajara and Cuernavaca. Others live in Mexico City, a cosmopolitan metro, in the desert border communities of northern Mexico, in exotic beachfront cities along the Pacific and Gulf of Mexico coasts, and in semitropical states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca.
 
They contribute to Mexico's economy, and some of them have businesses there. Despite the headline-grabbing violence of recent years, foreign companies have not stopped investing in the country, either.
 
“More than 18,000 companies with U.S. investment have operations there, and the U.S. accounts for nearly $100 billion of foreign direct investment in Mexico,” State Department officials said.
 
Mexico had 112.4 million people in 2010, according to the Central Intelligence Agency's World Fact Book. Since 2007, the country has reported about 60,000 homicides, most of which authorities attribute to the drug cartel wars.
 
Juarez, which has about 1.5 million people, has had 9,137 homicides since 2008.
 
Mexican officials have said that about 30,000 U.S. citizens live in the state of Chihuahua.
 
Bob Ailes, 59, and John Eidschun, 58, are U.S. retirees. Ailes has lived in a Mexican border community for more than 10 years, while Eidschun makes frequent visits across the border to spend long spells with friends, including expatriates.
 
“I've lived in several European countries and in different parts of the United States, and I've been to Canada, but Mexico turned out to be my best option for retirement,” Ailes said.
 
“The United States is the best country in the world, but there is something about Mexico and its people that draws you,” Ailes said. “I didn't speak Spanish when I got here, but learned the language and the local customs. I feel connected to the people.”
 
Ailes said he found he could afford to live on his retirement pension in Mexico. He knows and socializes with other expatriates like himself.
 
Eidschun said most of his social life takes place in Mexico.
 
“I stay with friends, eat in the restaurants and shop at the malls,” Eidschun said. “I am careful but not afraid to come here.”
 
Ailes said he's learned that it's best “to not put your nose where it doesn't belong, and no one will bother you.”
 
The number of expatriates who live in Mexico or spend long vacations there could be higher than the figure cited by the State Department, according to websites that serve expats.
 
Steve Schwab, 39, who works in the real estate industry, moved to Mexico in 2000 and created a website for expats called Mexico Online (www.mexicoonline.com).
 
For him and other U.S. citizens, safety in Mexico can be a matter of perspective or where one lives.
 
One of Schwab's online postings said, “The number one retirement destination in the world is Mexico. There are already over 2,000,000 U.S. and Canadian property owners in Mexico. The most conservative number of American and Canadian baby boomers who are on their way to owning property in Mexico for full or part-time living in the next 15 years is over 6,000,000.”
 
His posting also said “that the horrific violence in Mexico is over 95 percent confined to the three transshipping cities Juarez, Tijuana and Nogales.”
 
Homicides in Juarez rose after the drug cartel that controlled smuggling in the border city split into warring factions led by the Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman Loera and Vicente Carrillo Fuentes drug-trafficking organizations.
 
The conflict has led to unprecedented regionalized violence marked by unusual brutality and to significant numbers of slayings of journalists, politicians and human-rights activists across Mexico.
 
Barbara Eckrote, another expatriate from the United States, agrees that the violence in Mexico has been exaggerated.
 
In 11 years of living in Mexico, “I have never felt unsafe or had any incidents,” she said.
 
“I got Interpol stats and the most current FBI stats, and I was actually astonished to discover that no major city in the U.S.A. is as safe as all of Mexico,” Eckrote said. “For instance, the homicide rate in Philadelphia is 78 per 100,000.
 
According to the 2011 “United Nations Global Study on Homicide,” the murder rate for Mexico in 2010 was 18.1 per 100,000 of population; federal police reported a total of 20,585 murders (intentional homicides).
 
In the United States, the murder rate was 5 per 100,000 population in 2009 (the latest year for which information was available), with 15,241 murders reported.
 
The U.N. study shows that Brazil had the most homicides of all the countries in the Western Hemisphere, 43,909 in 2009 (a 22.7 rate); followed by Colombia with 15,459 in 2010 (a 33.4 rate); Honduras, with 6,239 in 2010 (an 81.2 rate); and Guatemala with 5,960 in 2010 (a 41.4 rate).
 
Dr. Rudi Unterthiner, author of the novel “Faces, Souls and Painted Crows,” said he, too, wants to stress the good side of living in Mexico.
 
The U.S. doctor divides his time between Canada and Mexico and is not overly concerned for his safety.
 
“I've never had a bad experience in Mexico,” Unterthiner said.
 
“I still perform medical procedures in Mexico to help low-income people out, and I have enjoyed my stays there over the years. My novel covers some of my more interesting experiences there.”
 
The State Department offers plenty of tips on safety and issues travel alerts on places of concern through its website at www.state.gov.

Mexico Online
State Department
NewsOK
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Birria De Chivo
 I believe it, even a lot of Mexicans are oblivious to what's happening in Mexico. I know of two girls that recently relocated to Mexico after their boyfriends were deported, one to Chalapa Jalisco, and one to La Paz baja Sur.
J
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

J
Some of it has to be economy related, a girl friend from high school whose family was always fairly well to do, big house in the suburbs, handful of new model vehicles, sold the house and moved back to TJ after the stock crash in 2008.  I'm sure that is far from a rarity.  A lot of good people, (US citizens) live in TJ, but a lot of them seem like weirdos and creeps, that live there for the sex trade.  
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

drattler
In reply to this post by Chivis
Govts are corrupt,I can live with that US and Mex but police jacking you up,customs people jacking you up,being afraid to drive a new vehicle,fear of kidnapping,robbery, and if anybody finds out you are in business then you are going to get jacked Extortion those are things that really upset Me. I do not care if Mexicans smuggle a billion tons of drugs to our wonderful,productive drug users in the USA, the biggest problem is they clog up the prisons and HAVE BANKRUPTED the social Welfare System in the US.  In Mexico its all the other crime NOT SMUGGLING DOPE just everything that goes with it.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Chivis
Administrator
one thing I am afraid to do, is have a business in Mx.  I thought of opening a business and all proceeds go to my foundation.  As a 501C3 and the treaty we have, I could work tax free if profits go to the charity.  I went as far as a business plan, educational supplies and uniforms at huge discounts working on a low margin so poor children would benefit and a small amount of profit back to the foundation, but I was too scared.  I thought it could begin a nightmare for me, so I did not do it.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Chivis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Chivis
I just read an interesting article in INSIGHT about the homicide figure in Mx and how screwed up it is read this:

To be sure, news organizations are filling an important hole in this debate. As the murder rate related to organized crime rose in 2007, the government did not provide statistics, which left news organizations scrambling to quantify the violence.
 
But as the homicides have increased, so have the differences in news organizations’ tallies. Zeta magazine, for example, estimated that there were 19,546 organized crime-related killings in 2010, much higher than the estimates of La Reforma (11,583) or the government. Expect similar differences between media again this year.
 
There are also wide discrepancies within the government’s own data. Last year, as InSight Crime noted, the Attorney General’s Office released data that was very different from the presidency’s estimates of drug-related murders.
 
At the heart of these inconsistencies is a difference in methodology. Zeta uses the number of intentional homicides committed by firearm but also includes data on intentional homicide by “other” or “unknown” means, which would include the many victims of violence that have been beheaded, disemboweled, hung from bridges or found buried in mass graves, but not shot by a firearm.
 
La Reforma's classification depends on the type of weapon and the way it was employed (e.g., execution style); how many dead; whether there are markings on the body or if it is mutilated; whether there are signs or symbols near the dead; official reports indicating the connection to organized crime; the presence of weapons and/or high volumes of cash at the crime scene.
 
The presidency uses three categories (download methodology here): executions, confrontations, and aggressions. The vast majority of these murders are classified as executions, which the presidency says have certain characteristics such as multiple victims, a message from a rival drug trafficking organization, and signs of execution-style killings. But even this is somewhat arbitrary.
 
The only part of this equation that seems clear is that the total number of homicides have increased. Classifying these homicides without proper judicial investigations and records is pure guesswork.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Guerro
In reply to this post by Chivis
This should go on the mainboard Buela..great story!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Americans Still feel safe in Mexico: of 1904 Deaths since 2003 1/4 were Homicide

Chivis
Administrator
Thanks Guerro!  Maybe that can happen.  You and I agree on this point and whenever possible I will drive the point home-MEXICO IS SAFE FOR AMERICANS!  SAFER THAN MOST IF NOT ALL OF THE US.

the end
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please