2018 Guerrero in Mexico

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2018 Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
This post was updated on .
I've seen many posts on different states of Mexico, but never for Guerrero (warrior), which is the most failed state.  Acapulco, Petatlan, Chilipancingo, Iguala, Taxco, Zihuatanejo, etc.  Let's get down to business and talk about this place.  The murder capital of Mexico, Acapulco, the heroin capital of the world, possible 60% arable land in poppies, the most complex regarding cartels and the adjacency to Michhocan, Mexico, Puelbla, Oaxaca.  Safe from the coastal road to the coast, beautiiful, a reason to visit, and the off limits places that feed into the poppy infested roads into the highlands.

Let's go.
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

ENDTHEWAR
The most foul executions seem to come out of Guerrero. The one a few months back still haunts me.
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

canadiana
Administrator
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Great idea Parro!It's yours or anyone else that wants to post Guerrero posts here.Can you just add 2018 to the above headline for easier future reference.Much appreciated and hey welcome to our small community on forum.We really get some good discusions going on here!
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Itzli
In reply to this post by Parro
Part of an article from La Jornada yesterday:

The violence in the state is generated by the cartels Guerreros Unidos, Los Rojos, Los Tequileros, Los Ardillos, Los Granados, del Sur, La Familia Michoacana, Los Jefes, La Barredora and Jalisco Nueva Generación.

One of the most violent organizations in the Tierra Caliente region is that which is led by Johnny Hurtado Olascoaga, El Fish, who, along with the remnants of La Familia Michoacana has made an alliance with the group of Nemesio Oseguera, El Mencho.

With that, El Fish –for whom the PGR offers a reward of up to 3 million pesos– controls the municipalities of Arcelia, San Miguel Totolapan, Apaxtla, Teloloapan and Ciudad Altamirano, in Guerrero.

Intelligence reports from the Federal Police located the municipality of Pungarabato as the center of operations of Johnny Hurtado, where in early 2016 two high precision telescopes from Germany that were seized in the International Airport of Mexico City were set to arrive.

Los Rojos, an offshoot of the Beltrán Leyva cartel that is led by Santiago Mazari, El Carrete, is another of the groups with the greatest force in the zone. Their principal activity is trafficking heroin to the United States.

This group is identified in at least 11 municipalities of Guerrero: Chilpancingo, General Heliodoro Castillo, Chilapa de Álvarez, Zitlala, Carrizalillo, Iguala, Atenango del Río, Copalillo, Copantoyac, Eduardo Neri and Tlapa de Comonfort.

The members of the cartel of Los Tequileros, which is led by Raybel Jacobo, are also considered violent and are related to the ambush against elements of the Agency of Criminal Investigation (AIC) -four dead and seven injured- perpetrated in June 2017 in San Miguel Totolapan.

With respect of the group Guerreros Unidos, the information indicated that they still have a presence in the zone; however, since the disappearance of the 43 students from the Escuela Normal Rural of Ayotzinapa they have lost strength due to the detentions of the alleged leaders, but they continue operating in the region.
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Cuidado
In reply to this post by Parro
The heroin capital of the world is Afghanistan my friend.
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
You are correct.  Thank you
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
In reply to this post by canadiana
Canadia, how do I do that?
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
In reply to this post by Itzli
Great info Itzli
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

leChef
In reply to this post by Parro
@Parro: Click on the "More" tab in the upper right hand corner and choose "edit post". Thanks for contributing. I think daily Guerrero reports will be quite easy to find unfortunately.
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
thanks leChef.  Yeah,  I'm kind've a glutton for punishment, but only going to look at the big stuff.  While in Guerrero last month, got pulled over in Zihaut 15 min. after I landed, where transit policia told me that I could pay them $50 to keep from going to the police station. My spanish is not good, but they finally got they weren't going to get anything.

Barra de Potosi, was empty.  It's become only a place for Mexican tourists, even though it's safe from the highway to the Pacific as long as you aren't out at night in Zihaut along the piers.

Operation Limpiesa was going in Petatlan while visiting their downtown festival.  Many municipal transports, guns and troops jumping into the plaza late in the night. Just across the street Cafe Viejo, where the mayor was assassinated while eating.

Down the road from Petatlan, I was stopped by guys with radios, had narco truck shoot over the road, with windows down and guns sticking out.  This was in Juluchuka.  What you notice is that most of the people on the road didn't even care to look up.  They were used to this stuff I guess.

Going down to Acapulco, I was stopped behind a military checkpoint on the far outskirts of town.  I realized I could get by, turning around and getting on 95 and just skipping Acapulco altogether.  On this road, I had to take a piss, but it's impossible to get off the road and there is some traffic.  I came up to block building and pulled in, had a little banos sign, went and paid by 5 pesos to some guy with gold bling, to pee on the top of turds piled up to the top, probably the worst 5 pesos I paid on my trip. To stretch my legs I walked along the building to the side where there was a door opened.  Walked up to and there were several people with what appeared to be black bags doing something.  One of them came at me immediately and it was a federal policeman.  I really didn't know what he was saying, but had his automatic out.  I wished a very good morning, day and bid him farewell.  I noticed the guy in the bathroom coming out and talking with the federales as I was walking away.  What was going on in the room, who knows, but it wasn't good.

Finally getting back on the toll road, the toll booths had been occupied with many people with their faces covered, wearing black goggles.  There was a lot of them and they had pushed the police to the sides. I first thought it was the narcos, but think it was the socialists, demanding cheaper tolls for the regular Mexican, who simply didn't have the money to travel on the safe roads.  I threw half the toll into their bucket and they wished me a good stay in Mexico.

Anyway, it was just a crazy place, but very interesting.  Chilpancingo, Guerrero's capital is full of bad guys.  Too many roads coming into the place.  Ran across some huaticholeros later, but didn't my their gas.  I don't want to help the bad guys.  Even with all this, almost all the people were very kind folks. They deserve some attention down there.

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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

deelucky1
Chilpancingo Is stronghold of el señor de la “I”.they claim that China white comes from their cultivation .they used too have an alliance with los ardillos to fight los ROJOS.lots of el señor people switched flag.el señor de la I aka cartel de la Sierra have the military on they’re payroll that’s how they stay under the radar !they are bigger than los rojos !
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

deelucky1





Mexico claims to having a real old pick of el señor de la I and to have no info how or where he moves .here’s showtime having him on video .then the federal fakes work being done showing off their technology and acts as if they take down their money plants .magic show !!
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
Gracias - DeeLucky - looks like mike Heineman is back at it. Believe I'll go to Shotime Go and catch up on this.  Regarding, El Señor de la "1", we'll see -
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
Senor "I", Isaac Navarrete Celis, aka "el Senor De La I", leader of Cartel Del Sur.  

Los Rojos and Ardillos going at it, Xavier Olea said "those two groups have become very violent and, as i have said, they seem to be psychopaths".

- "mi pais me da tristeza"

 - "Desde hace décadas, Guerrero no tiene solución"-

Isaac Nava Celis is "The Lord of the I", leader of Cartel Del Sur, the South Cartel (Sierra Unida Revolucionaria) joined forces with "Los Ardillos" to fight "Los Jefes", (formerly the Los Rojos) for the control of the Center and Mountain of Guerrero (Chilpancingo), fundamental in the drug route of the Acapulco-Cuernavaca drug corridor.

November 2017
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico

ToPHeR
Great info parro. I was this close to booking a trip to Ixtapa but went with Tulum instead just because we want to go see chitzen itza. I will definitely go to Guerrero next time!
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Re: Guerrero in Mexico Johnny Hurtado

Parro
Johnny Hurtado - an introduction by a norte corrido band from Guerrero to get the feel of the countryside where we can't go into anymore easily, great tuba playing and a glimpse into the mystique that surrounds Johnny Hurtado, paste the following link into your browser and skip through the ads, enjoy the music.

https://youtu.be/1zw-zoh3HXA

Johnny Hurtado Olascoaga has several nicknames, all are aquatic:  "El Senor Pescado", "El Pez", "El Mojarro", "El Fish" and "El Pescado".  Rest assured, he is not a fisherman or a sailor. As Itzil said, he remains a force in Guerrero, even though he started with La Familia in Michoacan.

Around November 2012, Johnny's father was arrested in Arcadia, Ulbaldo Hurtado.  So we see that Johnny didn't have much of a father figure.  He was in possession of a rifle, a magazine, 10 rounds of ammunition, a vehicle and a grenade launcher.  This 40 mm caliber grenade launcher with armor piercing capabilities and was recorded with two engravings, the : "I remember your friend Nazario Moreno FM, December 25,2005" and "Commander Ubaldo Hurtado".  

On July 1,2014, Jose' Maria Chavez Magana "El Pony", leader of La Familia in the state of Mexico, was captured in Guanajuato and subsequently Jose de Jesus Mendez "El Chango" was captured .  Johnny Hurtado took control of the organization and began his revenge with the support of "El Mencho" and the CJNG.  "El Pescado" agreed with CJNG, to rise up in the hot zone, Tierra Cliente.  

It all began with the Beltran Leyva cartel, but since its decline, the fragmentation began.  The Knights Templar ran into hard times, they renamed theirselves La Nueva Familia Michoacana with their armed wing, Los Troyanos. The rest of the cartel aligned with Johnny, who went under the banner of La Familia Michoacana.  Johnny now had control mainly in the south part of Michoacan, the north in Guerrero and an unspecified part of the State of Mexico. His main trade was heroin.  One of his top gunmen, Raybel Jacobo de Almonte, aka "El Tequialero" split off and started the Los Tequileros.  Another group that splintered out of the Beltran-Leyva organization is Los Rojos, who we will look into, on future posts.  

Mexico provides more than 90 percent of the USA heroin.  In just 2003, it was just 10 percent.  Guerrero produces more than half of Mexico's opium poppies, the base ingredient for heroin.  

Although Guerrero was the most violent state in Mexico for 2017 with more than 2,200 killings, Guerrero is no more the most violent state.  That honor passed this year to Colima, the Baja, and Guanajuato.  Many believe this is due to the crash in poppy prices, and the use of fentanyl in lieu of the poppy, for the production of heroin.  The gangs in Guerrero are approximate 50 in number now, which the smallest gang, being just 3 people.

Back in 2013 it is stated that Johnny got busted, sources in the State of Mexico confirmed it, but then they remained silent.  Efforts, thus far, have been fruitless to find this news.  

There is current award (March 24,2016)  of 3,000,000 pesos for the capture of Johnny, about USD $175,000.  Not much for a character that appears often in the top 12 wanted in Mexico.

Whether Johnny makes his base of operations in Pungarabato or Arcelia, is debatable.

More to follow

 




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Re: Guerrero in Mexico Johnny Hurtado - His Dad, Hannibal scicario?

Parro
https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-minds-of-cartel-hitmen-hannibal-lecters-for-hire?ref=scroll

In this link published by the Daily Beast, it talks of Hannibal scicarios, specifically the Knights Templar that Johnny's dad was a member of.  Hannibal scicarios mentioned in the article are the 15% of scicarios who are either psychopaths (without feeling) or sadistic (drawing out the death as long as possible to create the greatest amount of pain) including resuscitation of the victim in order to create more pain.

The Knights Templar had a ritual of cannabilizing their victim.  Like I said, Johnny didn't have much a father figure to fall back on.
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Re: 2018 Guerrero in Mexico

Chava
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Parro
https://www.elsoldeacapulco.com.mx/local/estado/millonaria-inversion-de-amlo-a-acapulco-guerrero-violencia-delincuencia-1994893.html

I'll come back and translate later. In a rush right now.

Great thread though!

EDIT: This is a google translate without any clean up.....



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2018
Millionaire investment from AMLO to Acapulco
Andrés Manuel López Obrador, will invest 650 million pesos in 2018 in a rescue program for marginal areas in the port of Acapulco

Abel Miranda Ayala / Correspondent

The government headed by President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador will invest 650 million pesos in 2018 in a rescue program for marginal areas in the port of Acapulco, according to Governor Héctor Astudillo Flores.

The program is part of a scheme proposed by the president-elect to rescue the border and tourist areas in which 10 billion pesos will be destined for the whole country, and in the case of Acapulco for the marginal zones, it will act on three slopes. , the first in improvement of public spaces, which includes improvement of streets, lighting, parks, among others.

The second point is related to housing and will seek to generate better housing conditions in these areas of marginalization, finally the third point will focus on regularizing land tenure "there are many families who live in their homes and do not have deeds, the program will guide from Sedatu. "

On the subject of security, the governor indicated that it will be until mid-October when Andrés Manuel López Obrador presents his security strategy plan for the country, and anticipated that it will focus on the creation of the Single Command, so that there will be a Single Command. Federal, a Single State Command and in Guerrero, seven regional Single Commands.

In the case of Guerrero, recommendations were also made for the appointment of the new secretary of Public Security, a portfolio that is currently headed by a dispatch officer following the resignation of Pedro Almazán.

OPERATING IN THE SIERRA
On the issue of La Sierra, the governor reported that a coordinated operation is maintained between the State Police, the Army and the Federal Police, the latter has assigned a helicopter that is making overflights throughout the area in the mornings and afternoons.

However, he acknowledged that there have been reports of shots that are not attended in a timely manner because of the risk involved in moving personnel in this region, especially at night.

"There may be shots in some places, but it is very difficult to go to all the places where there are shots, especially at night because of the danger that those who run, in this case by the police, are running."

He insisted that in the next few days reinforcements will be placed in areas where there has been conflict in the same scheme of collaboration with the Federal Police and the Army, in order to ensure free transit on the entire highway, once it has been have covered the high points, mechanisms to restore activities in the education sector and health.

The situation of La Sierra, recognized it is a lawsuit for control of the territory and what the territory has, "one of the issues that will have to be promoted more and going deeper, is the theme of the poppy, is a The issue that is implicit is an issue and what I also believe is that the region must be regularized. "

TRANSITION OF MAYORS

On the issue of the government transition of the mayors of Guerrero scheduled for the end of this month, the governor called to be respectful of the law and not misuse public resources.

He also offered the necessary guarantees for the president of Coahuayutla to assume his role, who recently denounced that there are no security conditions for taking protest and taking office.

He also indicated that there is an intense operation and there are already lines of investigation in the search for the mayor of Cochoapa el Grande, who has been missing for two weeks.
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Re: 2018 Guerrero in Mexico

deelucky1
This post was updated on .
Latin American Criminals Have Found a Low-Risk,
Lucrative Trade in ‘Express Kidnapping’ BY ALOYSIO SANTOS,
EPOCH TIMES July 25, 2015 Updated: August 3, 2015



   
 On a daily basis, people all over Latin America are victims of “express kidnapping”—they are taken and held hostage for an hour or several hours, while the kidnappers take their credit cards for a shopping spree, extort their families for money, and the like.

While kidnapping comes in various forms—including bride kidnapping, child abductions in custody disputes, or politically motivated kidnappings–in most cases kidnapping is about extortion. Simply put, most kidnappers are looking for money.

Kidnapping high-profile victims for large ransoms has long been a problem in many Latin American countries. But in more recent decades, criminal elements have found a new, highly profitable, and far less risky trade in express kidnapping.

Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela are four countries that are grappling most with this new scourge that affects both locals and foreigners.

Brazil
In the 1990s, before express kidnapping emerged, there was a significant number of extended-period kidnapping cases in Rio de Janeiro. Frustrated with the situation, citizens—particularly from the business community, which was at greatest risk—applied pressure on authorities to address the problem.


As a result, government policies were delineated, harsher laws were passed, and law-enforcement did its job. Following in Rio’s footsteps, other states implemented similar policies to combat the crime. Many kidnapping rings were busted and the “kidnapping industry” was to a large extent broken.

By the end of the 1990s, there was a significant reduction in the number of kidnappings, at least the traditional form of kidnapping in which people are held for days with families forced to raise large sums of money for ransom.

As law-enforcement improved, going after high-profile targets became far more risky; kidnappers were often quickly caught and served severe punishments.

So the crime world evolved. Criminals started to avoid forming large groups to elude detection, and began looking for more common and easier targets—the middle class, small-business owners, or anyone with easily accessible money.

A case in Brazil’s largest city, São Paulo, exemplifies how common express kidnapping by individual criminals or smaller groups has become. A couple was arrested for express kidnapping. The police published their photo around the neighborhood where they were caught, and the next day 11 other victims showed up at the police station to give testimony of their own experiences of express kidnapping at the hands of the couple.

One day, my father was leaving our garage in Niterói, just outside of Rio, with the car when two armed men stopped him and got into the backseat.
In the end, the couple was linked to at least 30 cases in a two-year period. The most common tactic used was this: one kidnapper held the victim at gunpoint in a vehicle while the other used the person’s bank card to withdraw money at ATMs or used the person’s credit cards to go on a shopping spree.


Sometimes express kidnapping happens for other reasons. One day, my father was leaving our garage in Niterói, just outside of Rio, with the car when two armed men stopped him and got into the backseat. They directed him to drive to a deserted place in Rio and left with the car. On the way there, he tried to engage them in conversation. One of the kidnappers told him, “We liked you, we won’t kill you. We need your car for a job. You will see it again.” The car was found by the police the next day. By what the kidnappers said and their “professional” behavior, their job suggested an assassination or drug deal.

We recognized the car only because of the license plate, as the car had been burned with two bodies inside.
My sister underwent a similar experience. The difference is that we found her car on the front page of a newspaper a few days later. We recognized the car only because of the license plate, as the car had been burned with two bodies inside.



Venezuela
Last month, the Spanish online media Infobae had this headline, “Express Kidnapping Increases in Venezuela: Criminals Demand Ransom in Dollars.”

Local police sources said that criminals can kidnap and free numerous people in the same night and can demand up to $50,000 in ransom, reported AFP. A private negotiator said that since the great devaluation of the local currency, the bolivar, ransom demands have been made in foreign currencies. Victims’ families are forced to gather their savings in dollars or euro, and only if the ransom surpasses $10,000 will the kidnappers agree to negotiate in bolivars.

Criminal lawyer Mario Mármol Gacía told AFP that kidnappings have increased more than 300 percent since 2009, and added, “Before criminals used to clone credit cards and attack armored trucks, but these operations aren’t profitable anymore and involve too great a risk. So, many gangs now prefer kidnapping.”

Victims’ families are forced to gather their savings in dollars or euro, and only if the ransom surpasses $10,000 will the kidnappers agree to negotiate in bolivars.
Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is trying hard to continue the populist policies of former leader Hugo Chávez, but the economic meltdown of Venezuela that started with Chávez is getting worse and worse. A general shortage of products, long lines to buy food, and high levels of unemployment has been accompanied by a growing number of homicides, kidnappings, and robberies.

One of the economic measures undertaken by Maduro’s government was to fix the dollar–bolivar exchange rate. To avoid losing money due to the fast devaluation of the bolivar, many people started looking for ways to buy foreign currency. Since most people have limited or no access to the official exchange market, a black market emerged and people started stock-piling dollars and euros at home. This became a great incentive for express kidnappings in Venezuela.

Colombia
The Marxist guerrilla movement FARC—an acronym for “Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia” but today a synonym for narco-trafficking—has played a major role in making Colombia a center for kidnapping.

Across Latin America, many criminal groups follow FARC’s example, adopting their tactics, thus FARC has played a key role in popularizing kidnapping in Latin America in general.


Some high-profile kidnapping cases became famous internationally, with hostages held for years. FARC exploited these opportunities as much as possible to promote its image and gain time via peace talks, while continuing its criminal and terrorist activities, reinforcing its ranks, rearming, and advancing its political agenda.

In spite of the gradual decline of common kidnapping, express kidnapping has risen in Colombia in recent years.
But this approach has also caused serious damage to the group’s image internationally. With the increased inflow of drug money—reaching an estimated $2.4 billion to $3.5 billion in 2014, according to remarks by Colombia’s defense minister last October—FARC has been reducing its dependence on kidnapping activities, while also avoiding unnecessary bad publicity and confrontations with stronger establishment forces.

In spite of the gradual decline of common kidnapping, express kidnapping has risen in Colombia in recent years.

It is difficult to gather precise numbers on express kidnapping in Colombia because many of the cases are recorded as robberies and many are not reported at all due to mistrust of security agencies or fear of retaliation by criminals. Nonetheless, Gen. Humberto Guatibonza, commander of the GAULA anti-kidnapping unit of the police, said guerrillas and common criminals have been increasingly turning to express kidnapping, reported El Colombiano.

Of the kidnappings recorded in 2013 and 2014 by Colombia’s Defense Ministry, there is a clear trend toward short periods of captivity with relatively small ransoms.

Mexico
“Kidnapping for ransom is an established criminal activity in Mexico,” said a U.S. Bureau of Diplomatic Security report.

These kidnappings have normally been associated with organized crime, especially drug cartels and gangs, as a terror toll for revenge and blackmail, but also as a lucrative supplement to drug-trade income. Especially after the 1994 economic crisis that hit the country, large-scale drug-related and other crimes, including kidnappings, grew considerably.

Express kidnapping has surfaced as a viable option for disbanded ex-gang or cartel-members.
In the war on drugs, some cartel heads were killed or imprisoned; and with the rise of self-defense groups, some large criminal groups were demobilized.

Meanwhile, smaller, but no less violent, criminal elements have mushroomed.

Express kidnapping has surfaced as a viable option for disbanded ex-gang or cartel-members. The appeal, and hence danger, of this form of crime is that it’s easily accessible to common criminals as it doesn’t require much experience or preparation.

Therefore, the evolution from classical kidnappings to express kidnapping has also happened in Mexico. According to a report by Dutch nongovernmental organization IKV, “Mexico is the absolute world leader in express kidnapping.”

Social media and grass-roots movements, combined with law enforcement measures, have helped reduce express kidnappings in Mexico, although many cases go unreported.

“The usual victim practice is not to notify police authorities, as the popular belief is that the police may be involved in the crime or are unable to resolve the situation,” stated the Bureau of Diplomatic Security report.

It also noted that foreigners are at high risk too, “Although there is no indication that U.S. citizens are being specifically targeted, they are frequent victims.”

Impact
The vast majority of express kidnappings targets the local population. But even with the small number of foreign victims, Latin American Travel Association (LATA) Chairman Byron Shirto wrote via email, “tourists to Latin America, like anywhere in the world, must be mindful of their security, [and] use common sense.”

He added that “huge improvements in public safety have been achieved and recorded positively over recent years especially in major cities.”

The law-enforcement community suggests a variety of preventative measures to avoid being kidnapped: avoid drawing attention to yourself by not wearing watches, expensive clothes, or carrying credit/bank cards; change your routes and routines regularly; stay alert at all times, especially when stopping at traffic lights and at night; avoid deserted places.

Of course, people don’t want to live a paranoid existence either. For people living in Latin America, following the recommendations would certainly lower the quality of life. It also serves to widen the social gap, with elite moving about in armored vehicles and surrounding themselves with security, while the rest of the population lives in fear.

So for Latin Americans, whatever the solution is to the challenges the region faces, nobody wants to live in stealth mode, while criminals rule the streets.  

https://www.theepochtimes.com/latin-american-criminals-have-found-a-low-risk-lucrative-trade-in-express-kidnapping_1411057.html
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Re: 2018 Guerrero in Mexico

Parro
Hey deelucky, little old from 2015 don't you think .  They do "ghost kidnapping" down there now, stealing a phone, and say they have someone, and get a ransom.  They also lock people in their cars and will not unlock them until the ransom is paid.  

Down there earlier this year, I was told that kids are the primary victims, since they are dear to the heart of the people who hold the ransom.  Men are second and wives last.  I do not know the reason for this.  Last year, a daughter was kidnapped in Puerta Vallarta.  The parents, ex-pats, had to pay quite a bit, to get her back alive.

 

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